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Full text of "Hamlyn's menagerie magazine"



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Menageri 
Magazine 



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No. 1.— Vol. 1. 



MAY, 1915. 



Price One Shilling. 






CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTORY 

BROOKE'S GREAT MONKEY SHOW, ALEXANDRA PALACE, 1889 

WILD BEAST FLOTATIONS \ 

SCOTTISH ZOOLOGICAL PARK 

ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND 
COUNCILLOR HAMLYN'S GORILLA ... 
ANIMALS IN WAR-TIME 



GENERAL NOTES 



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||amljm's Jttenajjerie JBajajta, 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 1.— Vol. 1. 



LONDON, MAY, 1915. 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

Hamlyn's Managerie Magazine will be a Maga- 
zine entirely devoted to a faithful record of past 
and present events in the Menagerie World. It 
will contain an absolute correct record of the Rise 
and Fall of the Wild Beast business in Great 
Britain; to do this I shall go back considerably 
over half a century. Arrivals and departures of 
any large consignments will also be noticed. 
Extracts from papers and periodicals from all parts 
of the World will be given. Articles from corres- 
pondents abroad will be most thankfully received, 
and paid for at ordinary rates. It is intended to 
improve the Magazine from time to time by any 
interesting photos or sketches that may be sent 
in. 

Hamlyn's Menagerie Magazine should appeal 
to every lover of Natural History, to every Zoo- 
logical Society, to every keeper of wild pets, and 
to every traveller and collector. It is proposed to 
publish the Magazine monthly. Advertisements 
will be accepted from all and sundry at low rates. 
Below will be found some few notices concerning 
the first article that appeared in the March List, 
"My First Gorilla"; they are so encouraging that 
I launch this Magazine without any fear of its ulti- 
mate success. To be successful one must neces- 
sarily be supported by the Animal Public. The 
yearly subscription has been most thoughtfully 
considered. It is payable in advance. I appeal 
most earnestly to all those who receive this first 
number to forward their subscription without any 
delay on enclosed form; it is only 10/-. 



Professor Robert F. Scharff, National Museum, 
Dublin, writes under date 30th March, 1915 :— 
"Dear Mr. Hamlyn, 

I think your articles are very well written and 
deserve a wider circulation. Some people I dare 
say may argue that the death of the gorilla is a 
just punishment of heaven on you for having 
wanted to make 600% profit. I am not one of 
those, and I know you are bound to make a 
good profit sometimes to retrieve all your 
losses, and it is not a paying concern unless like 



Hagenback you have capital and can run half- 
a-dozen gardens. I think you have a great gift 
of writing well, but believe me that books pay 
no better than selling lions unless you can write 
a good creepy novel. With best wishes. 
Yours sincerely, 

(Signed) R. F. SCHARFF." 
[The question of profit and loss will be fully gone 
into in the forthcoming article on "The Peculiari- 
ties of this Unique Business."— Ed.] 
©' ® ©, 
Mr. George R. Sims, the world-famed Dagonet, 
writing from Regents Park, March 3lst, 1915, 
says : — 

"My dear Sir, 

Thank you very much for your article on 'My 
First Gorilla,' which I have read with much 
interest; it is excellent. 

Very faithfully yours, 

(Signed) GEORGE R. SIMS." 

The following Articles will appear from time to 
time as opportunity occurs : — 

"How I became a Naturalist." 

"Why I went to the Congo." 

"My Second Visit to the Congo." 

"Gorilla Dealing — Alive and Dead." 

"A true acount of the origination of the Wild 
Beast Business in Great Britain." 

"The Peculiarities of this Unique Business." 

"My Visit to South Africa." 

"The Advent of the Boxing Kangaroo and the 
Wrestling Lion." 

"Concerning 'Peter,' one of the most famous 
Chimpanzees of the Age; also on the train- 
ing of Chimpanzees in general." 

"The Arrival and Landing of the Barnum and 
Bailey Show, 1899." 

"My Expedition to Dyers Islands, Cape of Good 
Hope, resulting in the capture of 125 Pen- 
guins and 12 Cape Sea Lions." 

"Ivory Buying in the French Congo." 

" Concerning the Water Elephant in the Fernan 
Vaz District, French Congo." 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



BROOKE'S GREAT MONKEY SHOW, 
ALEXANDRA PALACE, 1889. 

To have provided the greatest collection of Apes 
and 1 Monkeys that the world has ever known, or 
ever will know, is certainly something to be proud 
of, and to be remembered during the whole of 
one's life. 

It was with something akin to consternation 
that I received the following letter some day in 
May, 1889:— 

"Alexandra Palace, N. 

May, 1889. 



being aroused I determined to accept the invita- 
tion to interview Mr. Lee Bapty on the following 
day. 

Alighting at the Wood Green entrance I en- 
quired of the gate-keeper where I could find the 
General Manager. He asked if I had an appoint- 
ment; if so Mr. Lee Bapty is coming down the 
slope now with Mr. Walter Hill, the advertising 
contractor. 

On approaching the genial manager, I was 
greeted with the following remark, "Are you the 
Monkey Man ? If so I must ask you to come along 
to my general office in Queen Victoria Street." 



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Some of the original Keepers of Brooke's Monkey Show, Alexandra Palace, 1889. 



Dear Sir, 

If you can supply 1,000 Monkeys in about 
fourteen days time, come up and see me on 
Thursday next at eleven o'clock. 
Yours truly, 
(Signed) S. LEE BAPTY, 

General Manager." 
One thousand monkeys in fourteen days ! Why, 
the idea to my mind for the moment was prepos- 
terous and absurd. Only a thousand monkeys ! 
There was no dealer in Europe capable of supply- 
ing such a number so I reasoned, but my curiosity 



During the journey down it was explained to me 
that Messrs. Brookes, the proprietors of " Brooke's 
Monkey Soap," had entered into arrangement 
with the Alexandra Palace for an advertising show, 
to consist of at least 1,000 monkeys, and Mr. Le 
Bapty pleasantly remarked, "That's where you 
come in; you and I must see this thing through, 
and the unfortunate apes have to be found." 

I should like to mention here that after an hour's 
conversation with this gentleman I came to the 
conclusion that I had known him for years instead 
of an hour. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



My first question naturally was, "What have 
you done in the matter? Why come to me at the 
last moment?" " Simply this," replied Lee Bapty, 
"that I have been in negotiation with a country 
dealer; this is the contract he has sent me, and 
which I have no intention of signing-, [I might say 
I hold this precious document to this day], and 
am obliged to make arrangements elsewhere, with 
you even, or with anyone else; now what do you 
say?" "Simply this : that at the moment I could 
not enter into an agreement to supply a 1,000 
mixed monkeys; such an order has never been 
known before, but I undertake with three days 
notice to supply 100 monkeys." One hundred was 
ridiculous, but what would I charge for + hat num- 
ber? Ninety pounds delivered at the Alexandra 
Palace; I plainly told Lee Bapty I could not under- 
take to finance the Monkey Show, it was a large 
undertaking; Chimpanzees and Ourang-Outangs 
were expensive animals, and even a thousand 
pounds would not go far, so if you require 100' 
monkeys I will deliver them to you three days after 
receiving the ninety pounds. "Well," he re- 
marked, "to-morrow Friday I am engaged with 
the Directors, but I will give you an answer on 
Saturday." 

On my return home I consulted the "Shipping 
Gazette" and discovered that a famous steamer 
which always carried a quantity of animals and 
birds was due either Sunday night or Monday 
morning, and I felt sure I should find quite one 
hundred there. 

Saturday passed and no commission from Lee 
Bapty, so I came to the conclusion that the monkey 
business was off. 

However, much to my astonishment on Sunday 
morning, Lee Bapty drove up in great haste. En- 
tering the shop, he exclaimed, "I have finally 
decided to leave the collection of monkeys to you, 
and I am quite willing to finance the undertaking; 
unfortunately I was too late at the Bank yester- 
day (Saturday), but have managed by visiting the 
various hotels in my district in obtaining ninety 
pounds; I suppose you don't mind what it consists 
of?" It certainly was a miscellaneous collection — 
threepenny and fourpenny pieces, other silver, gold 
and postal orders — ninety pounds in all. Whilst 
counting the money, a telegram arrived from Deal 
stating that Messrs. Rathbone's steamer, "Mira," 
was passing, and would arrive at Gravesend some 
time Sunday night. I there and then remarked to 
Lee Bapty that his first 100 monkeys had arrived, 
and asked him to give instructions at the Palace 
to receive same in the morning, and also that I 
would call at his office in Queen Victoria Street 
on Monday about five o'clock for another ninety 
pounds. 

Arriving at Gravesend I was informed that the 
ss. "Mira" would not cast anchor before six 
o'clock in the morning. To my unbounded 
pleasure there were 100 Rhesus monkeys, with a 



leopard, and some mynahs for sale, the property 
of the cook. The price in those days ranged from 
8/- to 10/- each, and no amount of argument 
would move him to take less; if I did not give 10/- 
someone else would. I paid him there and then, 
and within two hours the animals were at Fen- 
church Street Station where a pair horse van was 
waiting to take them straight away to the Palace. 
They were delivered and counted in by two 
o'clock, and at four, according to appointment, I 
was at Queen Victoria Street. 

"I think," remarked Mr. Lee Bapty, "that I had 
better give you £180, for it seems to me, with 
ordinary luck, you will obtain the animals." 

The same night I again consulted the " Shipping 
Gazette," and found there was another steamer 
due on Wednesday. I also cabled various steamers 
at Port .Said, Malta and Gibraltar. 

Every steamer calling at Portland for the pilot 
from East Indies was advised as to my buying 
monkeys. Every dealer in Triste, Marseilles, Bor- 
deaux, Havre, Antwerp and Hamburg, were also 
solicited to submit numbers with prices, but in 
those days the monkey market was centred in Lon- 
don. I am pleased to say that the London dealers 
supplied the world then. On the Wednesday 
morning I received a visit from the late Mr. W. 
Pring, who carried on business in the Brompton 
Road. He advised me that he had 70 Rhesus mon- 
keys on the steamer arriving; he believed there 
were also some others; would I go down with him 
from Fenchurch Street and see what business 
could be done? 

It was arranged that the price on the steamer 
should be 8/- each; he would be satisfied with 
10/-. The baker had 75 for Mr. Pring, I pur- 
chased 120 from the cook and steward, and re- 
turned to town with 195, which were delivered at 
the Palace same day. The total delivered in three 
days from the above two steamers and other 
sources were 380, which naturally delighted the 
Management. Other dealers now discovering I 
was the contractor for the Show offered me large 
quantities of African monkeys, including Chim- 
panzees, and other rare specimens, of which 200 
were brought from them. The ss. "Limpopo" 
arrived in the London Docks from Durban, Natal, 
with eight splendid Black-armed Chacma Baboons. 
These, in one large cage, formed the principal at- 
traction at the Palace. Mr. Lee Bapty and myself 
then decided to visit the various continental sea- 
ports in search of any of the rarer varieties. Ex- 
tensive purchases were made from the Zoological 
Gardens at Antwerp, such as Mandrills, Negro 
monkeys, Tamerines, and rare Marmozets. Various 
specimens were also brought from the Jardin 
d 'Acclimation, Paris, Zoological Gardens, Rotter- 
dam, and the Zoological Gardens, Amsterdam. 
The number was now approaching 800 in all, col- 
lected within about 12 days. Another Rathbone 
steamer was now due which I hoped would enable 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



me to complete my contract. This steamer, if I 
remember rig-htly, was the ss. "Pleiades," the two 
traders were the butcher and the cook. On its 
arrival at Gravesend I found 150 Rhesus and 20 
Bonnet monkeys. My contract price was £40 
hundred with these two men. Whilst negotiating 
telegrams were handed them; the cook read his 
with a smile. He consulted with his partner. 
Would I give what they had been offered by wire? 
"By whom?" I enquired. They handed me the 
telegram to read. To my surprise it was as fol- 
lows : — 

"Chief Cook, ss. 'Pleiades,' c/o Agents, 
Gravesend. Would you accept hundred pounds 
for 100 monkeys, to be in fair condition, if so 
telegraph particulars to General Manager, 
Alexandra Palace. Reply paid." 
Considering I was the general manager for 
Brooke's Show, I considered that telegram ex- 
tremely funny. However, I did not inform them 
of that particular fact. I was not surprised at the 
contents of this telegram, I understood that it 
emanated from a jealous rival who desired to spoil 
my market. 

I suggested to the cook he should wire back 
accepting the offer providing clearance of the 
animals was made before ten o'clock the following 
morning, and that a deposit of £10 was made by 
post. Failing a satisfactory answer I was to pro- 
cure the stock at our original price; to ensure good 
faith on my part I would deposit £5 with the cook, 
to clear same the following day in the Albert 
Docks. That was agreed upon. I hastened back 
to the Palace straight away. On entering the 
offices I was handed the cook's, telegram which 
had somewhat puzzled the officials there. I im- 
mediately wired stating that no monkeys were re- 
quired, and that no telegram had been sent by the 
Palace Authorities to the ss. " Pleiades. " Return- 
ing home I received a wire from the steamer ask- 
ing immediate clearance of the monkeys, which 
was accordingly done. The cook and myself were 
well aware from which dealer this precious docu- 
ment emanated; still it failed in its purpose. By 
private arrivals with the above, the 1,000 had been 
reached. I was relieved: of all anxiety for on the 
Opening Day there was a certified number of 
1,020. 

I had the extreme pleasure of showing round the 
late Mr. A. D. Bartleet from the Zoological Gar- 
dens on the opening day. He gave me his personal 
assurance that it was the finest collection of Apes 
that he had ever seen, and that many years would 
pass before a similar collection would ever be 
shown. That statement coming from the finest 
naturalist of the day was the greatest compliment 
I ever received. 

The caretaking and feeding and management of 
such a vast number entailed great anxiety. The 
food consumed was enormous. Five keepers were 



continually kept busy looking after their charges. 
The mortality was ordinary, and occurred princi- 
pally with the common varieties. Unfortunately, 
we also lost several of the Anthropoid Apes, Chim- 
panzees, etc. Towards the close of the season, I 
received an enquiry from Sir E. H. Currie, Secre- 
tary at the "People's Palace," asking for terms 
for, I believe, eight weeks. I am under the im- 
pression that the terms fixed were £100' weekly. 
We formed a separate Exhibition, the entrance fee 
was one penny only. The East End flocked in 
their thousands to see this novel show. Sir E. H. 
Currie was delighted at the result of the Exhibi- 
tion. The only escape in connection with the 
Show during its period of existence occurred here. 
On our arrival, the Secretary (I believe his name 
was Mr. Shaw) expressed a decided wish that no 
accident should occur. He gave instructions to 
the night watchman that he should give particu- 
lar attention to the Monkey Show. The watchman 
then got an attack of nerves. What should he do 
in case of an escape of any of the Apes? He was 
a cheerful man. I tried in vain to explain that all 
my specimens were a self-satisfied, self-respecting, 
and quite agreeable to their unfortunate captivity. 
For four weeks no accident happened; still he 
wished to know what steps to take. My instruc- 
tions were if any animals were found roaming 
about during the night vigil, close all doors, win- 
dows, etc., and take a cab straight away to call 
me up at any time — I advised him to keep ringing 
the bell until I answered as I slept soundly. Judge 
of my surprise that at 2 a.m. there was a tremen- 
dous din at the door. I came to the conclusion 
that the whole of my menagerie at the back had 
escaped to the front ! No; it was a common four- 
wheeler containing the watchman who informed 
me with an awful shout that the baboons were 
loose. The only baboons that I certainly was ner- 
vous about was a family of Dogface, or Anubis, 
baboons (Cynocephalus anubis). These were adult 
specimens, and I fervently hoped that they were 
not at liberty. I find in the original catalogue 
that these were described as follows : — " Family 
of Anubis Baboons, father, mother and child, from 
West Africa, supplied by J. D. Hamlyn," and were 
kept in Cage No. 121. I instructed the cabman to 
drive to Betts Street, St. George's, where one of 
the keepers lived. We hastened on our way to 
the Palace. It was as I feared — the " Family" had 
escaped ! We entered the Show building. The 
"Family," it seemed, were challenging the whole 
specimens to mortal combat. The din was terri- 
ble ! The cabman, a specimen of the Antediluvian 
period, actually came running up to know if he 
could assist. I replied, "Yes; by keeping quiet 
and outside." The " Family" had escaped by their 
door being left unfastened by the keeper. We 
decided to leave the door open trusting they would 
voluntarily return to the seclusion of Cage No. 12. 
The male portion of the "Family" shewed fight, 
or threatened to make things unpleasant. By 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Hamlin's Jfanagm* JKaga;ittf. 

Published on the 15th of each month. 



Editorial and Business Office (pro tem) : — 
221, ST. GEORGE'S STREET, 

LONDON, E. 
Telephone: Avenue 6341. 
Telegrams: "Hamlyn, London Docks, London." 

Advertisement Rates, very reasonable, on appli- 
cation. 



The Editor will be glad to receive for publication 
articles and all interesting photos, the imports and 
exports of all stock, and foreign adventures with 
all wild stock. The subscription is 10/- per ann. , 
or 1/- each copy, post free, which will be sent 
under cover. The success of the Magazine depends 
entirely on the support given by the general 
public. Kindly fill up and return the enclosed slip. 



cautious movements we drove them towards No. 
12, and to our unbounded pleasure the male and 
the youngster entered the cage. The female, with 
the usual female perverseness, jumped through the 
window and escaped into the Portuguese Ceme- 
tery, where she was caught later in the day. Such 
was the first and last escapade in connection with 
Brooke's Great Monkey Show. After leaving the 
People's Palace, the collection of monkeys was 
sold piecemeal, and the largest collection of mon- 
keys remains a thing of the past. 

During the last ten years the trade in monkeys 
has been enormous. It is nothing for three Con- 
tinental dealers to receive during a season of three 
months 5,000 monkeys each. These are, of course, 
of the ordinary Indian variety, all coming from 
Calcutta. 



WILD BEAST FLOTATIONS. 



JOINT STOCK RISKS IN THE JUNGLE. 

We have been called on from time to time to 
deal with a large variety of different undertakings 
in which the public have been invited to put money 
but so far a venture for coralling the wild animal 
trade has not come our way. Nor in truth has it 
yet arrived, but it threatens to make its appear- 
ance, judging by a communication addressed to us 
by Mr. John D. Hamlyn, the naturalist, of 221, 
St. George's Street, E. We have made enquiries, 
but cannot learn anything definite of any syndicate 
to embark on this venture, though the penning up 
of Germany and the probable commandeering of 
Carl Hagenbach's menageries for commissariat 
purposes are held to supply an exceptionally 
favourable opportunity. The rumour apparently 
originated in the States. We do not imagine 



ourselves at all qualified to discuss a wild beast 
prospectus, and in the hope that it may stave off 
the appearance of such a fearsome document- 
much as we desire to encourage legitimate enter- 
prise in these times — we gladly avail ourselves 
of some very pertinent comments which Mr. Ham- 
lyn has made in anticipation of such a flotation. 
He says : — 

I am quite unaware of any proposed organised 
concern to deal in animals in this country. For 
any one trading amateur, or even a dozen 
amateurs, to attempt such an undertaking would 
be ridiculous. Dealers in wild animals are born, 
they are not brought about by frivolous costly 
expeditions for rare birds. I have no hesitation 
in stating that none of these collecting tours 
have ever been a financial success, and these so 
far have only touched bird. I well remember 
some years ago the proprietors of an American 
circus giving a commission to a big game hunter 
in East Africa. The hunter certainly obtained 
the animals out there; anyone with money and 
even without brains can do so. But could he 
bring them home and down to the coast? The 
majority of the animals died, and the fact 
remains that only the dealers can box and travel 
the animals down to the coast, bringing them 
home at a reasonable freight. This collector 
even paid ,£25 freight on one leopard, actual 
value about £15, and when the consignment 
reached London from East Africa I was solicited 
to move them on to the American steamer, 
which I declined to do. I strongly advise all 
intending investors to have nothing to do with 
such a project. 

Clearly Mr. Hamlyn knows how to read a wild 
beast prospectus even without seeing it, and he 
warns investors in true professional style. We 
hope they will bear the opinion of so famous an 
expert in mind should occasion really arise. 



WILD ANIMALS AND THE WAR. 
Among the industries which lament having been 
hit by the present conflict in Europe, it would 
obviously not be fair to overlook the wild animal 
trade. Mr. John D. Hamlyn, the well-known 
naturalist of the East End, in his monthly circular 
states that imports have been entirely cut off and 
that there is a scarcity of monkeys and small birds. 
We can well believe it. Hence Mr. Hamlyn's 
circular is rather bare of professional particulars. 
But he bravely announces that he is carrying on 
business as usual and that he proposes to devote 
the ample space for the time being at his disposal 
in his circular to general articles of interest to 
lovers of natural history. As these articles are in 
the nature of autobiographical narratives, they 
certainly should be entertaining, and if the first 
contribution is any criterion they undoubtedly will 
be. Mr. Hamlyn also promises a history of the 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



wild beast trade during the last forty years. If he 
waits till the end of the war, and covers recent 
developments in Belgium, he will be able to bring 
it thoroughly up to date. 

The Financial Times, 10th April, 1915. 

SCOTTISH ZOOLOGICAL PARK. 

The completion of work undertaken at the Scot- 
tish Zoological Park, Corstorphine, this winter, 
is being rapidly pushed forward, in preparation 
for the Edinburgh Spring Holiday. The new pen- 
guin pool is finished, and the enlargement of the 
polar bear pool will also be completed in time to 
allow the bears being back again in the pool on 
Monday. This enclosure has been greatly enlarged 
and improved; the temporary wooden barrier and 
cages which fenced it on the north side have been 
removed, and a consisderable extension has been 
made at that point. The new permanent sleeping 
cages of the bears have been erected at the western 
end of the enclosure, and they are screened from 
the view of the pool by a wall of boulders. The 
northern side is now bounded by a cliff and the 
boundary wall, and the path around it on the south 
has been lowered, so that a much better view of 
the pool is obtained. The outside enclosures at- 
tached to the Acclimatisation House have been 
completed for some time, and the animals have 
now access to them. Many minor improvements 
have also been carried out in the way of road 
repairs, planting of flowers and u shrubs', etc. , which 
greatly enhance ,the amenity of the Park. The 
chimpanzee belonging to the Society has been on 
view for some time in the Acclimatisation House; 
at first somewhat afraid of visitors, he has now got 
over his shyness, and affords much amusement. 
Among the recent additions to the collection are 
three marmosets, a golden agouti, and one or two 
small monkeys, which are exhibited in the Acclima- 
tisation House, two' Scottish wild cats from In- 
verewe, Ross-shire, and a female Bennet's wal- 
laby. The last is accompanied' by a young one, 
whose head can frequently be seen looking out of 
the mother's pouch. With the advance of spring 
many of the birds in the Park have shown an 
inclination to nest. In the parrot aviary a pair of 
cockatoos have already had eggs (which are 
deposited in a burrow made by the parent bird), 
and others are busy excavating holes in the 
ground. In the smaller parrakeet aviary a pair of 
Alexandrine parrakeets (which also nest in holes 
in the ground) have one egg. 

Scotsman, 17th April, 1915. 

ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY 
OF IRELAND. 

The Council met on Saturday, Sir Chas. Ball, 
President, in the chair. Also present : — Prof. G. 



H. Carpenter (Hon. Sec.), Dr. MacDowel Cos- 
grave (Hon, Treas.), W. E. Peebles, Dr. R. F. 
Scharff, the Right Hon. Jonathan Hogg, Dr. A. 
K. Ball, the Hon. Mr. Justice Boyd, Prof. J. B. 
Butler, Prof. A. F. Dixon, M. F. Headlam, James 
Inglis, Dr. Leeper, Prof. Metam, Sir F. W. Moore, 
Dr. O'Carroll, Prof. Scott, L. E. Steele, H. F. 
Stephens, Sir R. H. Woods. 

The Secretary reported a letter received from 
one of the Society's corresponding members offer- 
ing to bring home a rare monkey and a civet cat 
this month, which he had some time in his posses- 
sion. News of the date of arrival should shortly 
be to hand. Monkeys are always a welcome addi- 
tion to the collection, as to the ordinary visitor they 
form one of the most attractive exhibits in the 
Gardens. The young elephant will very soon 
begin its trips round the grounds again with the 
approach of the finer and longer days. The animal 
has grown very much since it has been in the Dub- 
lin Gardens, and has added considerably to its 
repertoire as regards tricks, picking up half- 
pennies, threepennies, etc. Several members 
drove out convalescent soldiers to listen to the 
band of the South Irish Horse last Wednesday. 
Many members and visitors to the Gardens (non- 
members) are still unaware that members of the 
forces are admitted at 3d. per head any day, and 
the Gardens are greatly enjoyed by the convales- 
cent men, as there are plenty of seats scattered 
through the grounds, and always tame water birds 
and the larger sorts of cranes wandering round, 
very eager to come up for bits of bread which they 
will take from the hand, or catch, with never a 
miss, in their bills. The rheas, or South American 
ostriches, are even seen to try their luck in any 
pocket which has a large enough opening, and are 
known to investigate the contents of outside 
pockets in the hope of finding something to their 
taste. The refreshment room provides tea at 
moderate prices, and lunches of a varied kind can 
also be had. Visitors for the week — Sunday, 
2,428; other days, 1,124. Mr. R. H. Macrory, 7, 
Fitzwilliam Square, was elected a life member of 
the Society. 

Irish Times, 3rd April, 1915. 

COUNCILLOR HAMLYN'S GORILLA. 



AN INTERESTING RECORD. 
Councillor John D. Hamlyn, the great naturalist, 
of 221, St. George Street, London Docks, has, as 
we briefly intimated last week, issued a unique 
business circular. It contains many evidences of 
the kindly originality which marks his character. 
He has had a remarkable and instructive career. 
He was the sole contractor for the great monkey 
show at the Alexandra Palace in 1889: — 90, and he 
was specially retained by Messrs. Barnum and 
Bailey on two occasions. In 1904 he was specially 
appointed by the Royal Commission on Tubercu- 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



losis to visit the Belgian and French) Congo for 
Anthropoid Apes. The 1905 expedition resulted in 
the capture of the celebrated gorilla, " Miss Crow- 
ther," with 25 chimpanzees. He has. undertaken 
other expeditions into Cape Colony, Basutoland, 
Portuguese Africa, the Transvaal, and Rhodesia, 
all of which resulted in valuable collections of 
animals, birds, reptiles and fishes. 

Councillor Hamlyn intends to issue his price list 
at various times as a magazine, and each one will 
contain articles of interest to lovers of natural 
history. While intimating to his numerous clients 
that he is carrying on business as usual, the worthy 
Councillor explains that the present arrivals in 
this country are absolutely nil; but his price list 
shows that he has in hand a large stock of birds 
and animals for disposal. 

An interesting account of the naturalist's first 
gorilla appears in this price list, in the course of 
which he says : — 

"Some 25 years ago I was asked 1 by the late 
Carl Hagenback to proceed to Havre to receive a 
consignment of 40 deer, which had been specially 
collected by one of his travellers in the Siberian 
Forest, and shipped from Vladivostock to Havre 
for transportation to Woburn, via Southampton. 
Arriving at Havre in good time, I made the neces- 
sary arrangements for shipping over, having pre- 
viously ordered a special train to be in readiness 
at the Southampton Docks on arrival of the Havre 
steamer. The following day the French Congo 
steamer arrived at Havre, and having nothing to 
do I went round to see if there was anything for 
disposal from those regions. There was at that 
time in Havre a well-known French dealer, a Mr. 
Schrager, who I met on the steamer, and, to my 
surprise, he gave me the startling information 
that there was a young gorilla there for sale. It 
was the property of the captain, or rather, it had 
been sent home for sale in his charge. We found 
it on the upper bridge, outside the captain's cabin, 
in an ordinary packing case, open to all wind and 
weathers. The captain demanded £40 for it, 
which I thought very reasonable. Mr. Schrager 
advised me to be in no hurry; he said there were 
no buyers so far as he knew, and would I leave the 
purchase to him. I asked naturally about the price 
he intended to offer. He suggested £121, and 
would only ask me £16. To this I naturally 
agreed. I suggested to Schrager that I should 
not be seen in the matter, for although I am sup- 
posed to be possessed of a large amount of self- 
confidence, I had not sufficient courage to offer 
£12 for a gorilla. Mr. Schrager made his offer. 
We were, just as I expected, politely asked to go 
ashore. The following day the Vladivostock 
steamer arrived with the collection of deer, so I 
left the gorilla entirely in Schrager's hands. In 
the evening he called at the hotel, stating the 
gorilla was in his establishment, and was mine for 
£16. It was a female. In first-class condition, 



absolutely shy and nervous, as all self-respecting 
gorillas are in captivity, I sailed the same night 
with the deer and my first gorilla for Southampton, 
where all arrived 1 well." 

Mr. Hamlyn then goes on to tell of his troubles 
about the special train at Southampton. However, 
the deer were safely delivered at Woburn, where 
he received the congratulations of His Grace the 
Duke of Bedford, and also of Mr. Carl Hagenback 
who was there awaiting him. 

Proceeding, Mr. Hamlyn says : — 
"The gorilla returned home with me to Euston 
and St. George's. At that time Messrs. Barnum 
and Bailey were touring the country with their 
vast show. They were at Southport. I wired 
offering a gorilla for £100. I received an answer 
from Mr. G. O. Starr,, representing Mr. James A. 
Bailey, asking me to come down if I had a gorilla. 
Having nothing else but a gorilla, I decided to 
go to Southport at once. Mr. James A. Bailey, 
with his usual business promptitude, said, 'Ham- 
lyn, if you have a gorilla, we shall be at Bristol 
on Monday, and if you deliver the gorilla on the 
show ground at Bristol, mid-day, you will be paid 
your £100.' I arrived' home from Southport on 
Sunday afternoon, and entering I gladly informed 
my wife that I had sold the gorilla for £100. In 
reply to which she said, 'Jack, the little fellow is 
dead. ' My reply was, 'Well, then, let us have our 
dinner.' On Monday I decided to dispose of the 
body to the first bidder, some dozen telegrams 
were dispatched to museums, hospitals, and 
various other institutions asking for offers, and I 
vowed it should go to the first one| received. I 
was disgusted with my first gorilla venture. The 
first telegram came, 'Accept gorilla for £10.' I 
instructed the keeper to pack the animal and 
deliver it at the station at once. Some twenty 
minutes after it had left another telegram arrived, 
'Best offer for gorilla £12,' yet another offer ar- 
rived for £15. Finally, I received an offer of £25. 
After that telegram I came to the conclusion that 
I was not an adept at gorilla dealing, alive or 
dead." 

Mr. Hamlyn adds a characteristic note about 
starting war on the German wild animal trade. 
He observes : — 

"Dealers in wild animals are born; they are not 
brought about by frivolous expeditions for rare 
birds." And he should know. In his periodical 
price list, ranging from zebra finches at 4/- each, 
to an Indian jungle cat — '"very rare, only one in 
Great Britain, no offers entertained" — he declares 
that an American story that England has organised 
a big wild animal trading concern to capture the 
German market is entirely new to him. Anyone 
with money, and without brains, can collect the 
animals, but it needs Mr. Hamlyn to get them 
home alive at a reasonable freight. Such is the 
tenour of his argument. 

East London Observer, 10th April, 1915. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



ANIMALS IN WAR-TIME. 



Baboons are up in price, alligators scarce; any- 
one who wants to add a Tasmanian devil, a sea- 
lion, or even such common things as Polar bears 
or peccaries to his domestic circle has now to pay 
twice as much as would have been enough twelve 
months ago. And this is all due to Teutonic ambi- 
tions, said Mr. Hamlyn, the famous menagerie 
keeper of St. George's Street, East, in an inter- 
view yesterday. While the English housewife has 
been bemoaning the rising prices of butter and 
eggs, or watching the fluctuations of coal and fire- 
wood with anxious eyes, matters have been getting 
serious in other and unexpected directions. If the 
Avar has not succeeded in reducing us to actual 
hardships as far as food goes it has played havoc 
with our supplies of live seals and grizzlies, skunks 
and platypus, foreign parrots and giant tortoises, 
and all those other foreign things in fur and feather 
the public loves to see at the Zoo, but never stops 
to ask how or whence they come into our hands. 

It is not so much that we are no longer able to 
import these creatures, Mr. Hamlyn explained, as 
that the home demand has decreased, while 
nothing at all is coming from Germany, who, up 
till last autumn, added to her multitudinous com- 
mercial activities by making herself the interna- 
tional clearing-house and general distributing 
centre of wild stock for the whole of Europe. 

In this she had an advantage in a geographical 
position which enabled her to supply the public 
gardens and private collectors of Russia, Italy, 
Austria, France, and other countries much more 
easily than we could. Her banks, too, have never 
failed, in this as in larger matters, to stand behind 
thedr compatriots in the way of financial advances. 

Thus it came about that the German dealer was 
able to go to India, Africa, or our Colonies and 
purchase British-born wild animals by the hundred 
where we only ordered dozens, and birds by the 
thousand when the home markets could only take 
scores, and an industry particularly our own passed 
largely into the hands of the enemy. 

Daily Telegraph, April 7th, 1915. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

That the additions to the Zoological Society's 
Menagerie for the week ending May 2nd, 1915, 
include : — Mammals : 4 Canadian skunks, 7 
Prairie wolves and 21 hybrid moufion. Birds : 1 
masked grass-finch, 1 pin-tailed whydah-bird, 2 
black-tailed weaver-birds, 1 black tanager, 1 
Houbara bustad, 24 gold pheasants and 1 bur- 
rowing-owl. 

That in one week in April the following private im- 
portations arrived. It is the more remarkable 



inasmuch as the respective owners all asked the 
extraordinary figure of £150 a lot. 

Two Congo Chimpanzees — £150 asked. (So 
far as I know, only the smallest of the two have 
been sold.) 

Two Gibbons from Sumatra — £150 asked. 

Two Ourang-Outangs from Sumatra — £150 
asked. (The ultimate destination of these two 
lots are, so far as I know, undetermined.) 

That a consignment of Senegal Birds is shortly 
expected, being a direct importation from Sene- 
gal. I wish the importer every success in this 
very risky undertaking. 

That the arrivals in London the past month have 
been practically nil — only sixteen Pennant Par- 
rakeets from Australia. 

That the arrivals in Liverpool have been some 94 
Amazon Parrots, 1 Sun Bear, 1 Bush Cat, and a 
few African Parrots with G African Monkeys. 

That the arrivals ex Rotterdam, Parkestone Quay, 
have been some 3,000 Canaries collected in 
various parts of Holland. Also Carolina Ducks 
with other Waterfowl. 

That Mr. George Jennison, of the famous Belle 
Vue Gardens, Manchester, was in London lately 
and made extensive purchases. 

That Volpy's Italian Circus (sole proprietor, Mr. 
E. H. Bostock) is meeting with great success 
on its tour of South Africa. 

That the exports to the United States, so far as I 
know, have been the below mentioned, all per- 
sonally collected here from various amateurs 
and Zoological Gardens : — 21 various Kan- 
garoos, 5 Capybaras, 2 Emus, 4 Rheas, 2 Indian 
Bears, 8 Impeyan Pheasants, 6 Javan Peafowl, 
5 talking Grey Parrots, 4 Macaws, 16 various 
Monkeys, with other odds and ends. 

That last year I sold a customer in Somerset a 
pair of Demoiselle Cranes; he now writes : — 

"Dear Sir, 

You will be interested to hear that the two 
cranes that I bought from you have laid two 
eggs; and I should now like to know whether 
it is possible to rear these birds in this coun- 
try. If so, would you kindly give me all 
details of the measures I ought to take to 
that end." 
I should be pleased to hear from any of my 
readers on this matter, which information I 
would gladly send to my client. I believe it is 
seldom that the Demoiselle Crane breeds in 
this country. 



Printed by W. J. Hasted & Son, (T.U.), 306, Mile End Road, London, E. 



Telegrams: Hamlyn, London Docks, London. 



Telephone : 6341 Avenuk. 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East. 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station. 

Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence five minutes walk. 
P.O.O. payabh at Leman Street, East. Cheques crossed " London County <S> Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled, 



TERMS. 
NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from time of leaving my establishment. 

Stock once sold cannot be taken back, 
TELEPHONE. — Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any part of Great Britain any time day and 

night. 

LETTERS. — Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as received. Full name and address with 
every communication. 

DELIVERY. — Stock is generally delivered direct to the various London Railway Termini but no particular train can be 

guaranteed. 
PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same. 



t 



1 Polar Bear, very good size 

2 Lions, 3—4 years. Adults, fine specimens 

6 Californian Sea Lions, various sizes 
1 Camel, good worker, quiet, sound... 

100 American Grey Squirrels, all ready for 

turning out ... 
20 American Horse Shoe Crabs 

1 Mouflon, black, curious breed 

2 Australian pure bred Dingoes 

3 ,, „ ,, Pups 

2 American Raccoons, large 
1 Indian Civet Cat... 

1 Dourocouli, very tame 

1 Alligator, three feet long ... 

4 English Fox Cubs 

" Daphne," a female, self-respecting Chimpanzee, 
runs about house at liberty 

3 Black Swans, males 60/- females 70/- 
20 White Swans ,, 20/- „ 25/- 

All packages charged extra. 
12 Peafowl, cocks 20/6 hens 25/6 

Packages charged for. 

1 Black and White Stork ... 

3 Barheaded Geese, gander 50/6 goose 60/6 

7 Egyptian „ „ 12/6 ,, 15/6 

2 Whitefronted,, ,, 20/6 ,, 20/6 
12 Carolina Ducks drake 15/6 duck 2o/6 

7 Common Wood Pigeons (6 months in stock) 

8 Triangular Spotted Pigeons, cocks 20/- hens 25/- 

3 Bleeding Heart Pigeons, cocks 30/- hens 35/- 

1 Bronze-winged Pigeon ... 

14 Jungle Fowls, cocks 10/6 hens 12/6 
6 Silver Pheasants, cocks 12/6 hens 16/6 

2 Mongolian ,, ,, 25/6 ,, 30/6 
8 Golden ,, ,, 16/6 „ 20,6 
2 Amherst ,, ,, 20/6 „ 25/6 
6 Swinhoe ,, ,, 30/6 ,, 40/6 
1 Caracara, very handsome birds, rare 

1 European Kestrel 
1 Macaw, red and blue 

5 Macaws, blue and buff ... 

1 Grey Parrot, 4 year* acclimatised, whistles, talks 
1 „ „ 3 ., 

1 „ „ 3 ,, 

The above three birds are exceptionally good 



„ £80 

,, £30 

£26 

sach 16/6 

„ 40/6 

60/6 

:ach 80/6 

,, 40/6 

,, 60/6 

40/6 

40/6 

70/6 

:ach 16/6 

£40 
pair £6 

£2 

pair £2 



for 
pair 



each 
pair 
pair 
for 
pair 



only 

for 
each 
£7 



£2 
£5 
25/6 
40/6 
30/6 
10/6 
40/6 
60/6 
40/6 
20/6 
25/6 
50/6 
30/6 
40/6 
65/6 
40/6 
5/6 
70/6 
60/6 
10/- 
£6 
£5 



for 


£2 


,, 


£2 


,, 


30/6 


pair 


20/6 


each 


35/6 


,, 


12/6 




40/6 


,, 


25/6 




20/6 


,, 


25/6 


„ 


25/6 


,, 


12/6 




5/6 




4/- 


pair 


5/6 



1 Yellow-fronted Amazon, very nice bird 

1 Red „ „ „ „ „ 

1 Porto Rico ,, „ ,, ,, 

22 Cockatiels, hens 12/6 cocks 10/6 

3 Indian Cock Shamans, singing 
10 Pagoda Starlings, or Mynahs 

1 Green-billed Toucan, large fine bird 

1 Virginian Cock Nightingale 

1 Chinese white-eyed Mocking Bird... 

1 Indian white-crested Babbling Thrush 

1 Indian white-breasted Thrush 

1 Blood-stained Finch, wonderful singer 

9 Bishops, out of colour 
12 Zebra Finches, cocks only 
100 Budgerigars, cocks 3/- hens 3/6 
20 pairs for £4 10s. 

Monkeys at present are scarce. 

The Polar Bear, Lions, and Sea Lions are daily expected with 
the Grey Squirrels and Crabs. 

The following stock has just left for New York : — 
20 Bennet Kangaroos. 
10 Rheas. 

6 Capybaras, very large. 

2 Indian Bears. 
20 Mixed Monkeys. 

5 Grey Parrots. 
12 Peafowl. 
17 White Swans. 



ROLLER CANARIES. Voogts Strain. 

All these birds have given every satisfaction. 

Roller hens, I. Class, 3/- each. These match No. I. cock. 

Ordinary hens 2 for 3/- in wicker cage. 14 in 7 cages, 15/-. 
Roller cocks, I. Class, 12/- each, usually sold at 20/-, 30/- each. 

These are finest birds obtainable, having the waterbubble, 

Woodlark and Nightingale notes, soft, low, sweet notes of 

unheard of beauty. 
Roller Cocks, II. Class, 7/6 each, 7 in 7 cages 42/- Very fine 

Rollers of exquisite song, many being worth 10/- each. 
Roller Cocks, III. Class, 6/6 each. 7 in 7 cages 35/-. Good sound 

serviceable birds, long notes, usually sold at 8/- each. 



p= 



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^ 



H AMLYN' Sf 









rED 



Menagerie 



Magazine. 



t 






No. 2.- Vol. 



JUNE, 1915. 



Price One Shilling. 



CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTORY ... ... 

A FEW NOTES ON THE LATE DR. F. S. PEARSON 

ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND 

RATS AT THE DOCKS 

ANTHROPOIDS 

SCOTTISH ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY 

WAR AND WILD BEASTS ... 

NO LIONS WANTED 

THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS OF THE WORLD 



GENERAL NOTES 



& 



>Qc 



3 



Hamlgn's Jttmajjerie Jttagajto. 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 2.— Vol. 1. 



LONDON, JUNE, 1915. 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

The first copy of Hamlyn's Menagerie Magazine 
was sent to His Most Gracious Majesty King 
George V.; acknowledgement herewith : — 

Buckingham Palace. 
The Private Secretary is commanded by 
the King to acknowledge the receipt of 
Mr. John Hamlyn's letter of the 15th inst., 
together with a copy of " Hamlyn's Mena- 
gerie Magazine.'' 
18th May, 1915. 

Two thousand copies were circulated. One was 
sent to every Zoological Garden in the world, with 
the natural exception of certain Gardens in Europe; 
to every known Amateur of Animals and Birds in 
the world; to every dealer wherever situated. A 
specimen copy is still at the disposal of any one 
sending name and address on postcard. The 
general reception of the first number has been 
favourable. 

The "Times," our leading paper, in its issue 
of the 18th May, states :— 

"A MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 
We have received the first number of 'Ham- 
lyn's Menagerie Magazine,' edited by Mr. J. 
D. Hamlyn, the dealer at London Docks (Is. 
monthly). It is intended to be a faithful record 
of past and present events in the menagerie 
world, including 'the rise and fall of the wild 
beast busisness in Great Britain.' The maga- 
zine, which is only eight pages, is written in a 
lively style, but there is perhaps too much quota- 
tion from other papers." 

The "Graphic," of the 29th May, says: — 

"NEW BOOKS OF GENERAL INTEREST. 

Hamlyn's Menagerie Magazine (221, St. George's Street, 
London Docks, E.J. is f This Magazine is issued by the well- 
known animal dealer of the above address, and will be "a 
faithful record of past and present events in the menagerie 

world."] 

Among the things that have suffered owing 
to the war is the wild beast business, though it 
is curious that this moment is chosen for the 



launching of a new paper named the 'Menagerie 
Magazine,' issued by Mr. Hamlyn. It isi pointed 
out. that during the last few years Germany has 
become the greatest importer of wild beasts, but 
events have proved that she has also become the 
greatest exporter of wild beasts; in fact, the 
wild beast is indigenous to her Odinesque soil." 

The "Yorkshire Observer," of May 24th, says : — 
"A MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 
We have received a copy of the first number of 
'Hamlyn's Menagerie Magazine,' a monthly 
publication which is probably unique in journal- 
ism. The editor, Mr. John D. Hamlyn, 
announces that he launches it 'without any fear 
of its ultimate success,' though he adds that to 
be successful 'one must necessarily be supported 
by the Animal Public' 'The yearly subscrip- 
tion has been most thoughtfully considered,' he 
continues. 'It is payable in advance ... it is 
only 10s. ' The Animal Public is undoubtedly a 
numerous body, but subscriptions, unfortunately 
are only to be looked for from the human part of 
it. The first number consists of eight quarto 
pages, so that the subscription works out at a 
little over a penny a page. Two and a half 
pages are taken up with extracts from daily 
newspapers. From Mr. Hamlyn's price-list, 
which appears as an advertisement on the cover, 
we learn that a polar bear, 'very good size,' 
may be purchased for .£60; a camel, 'good 
worker, quiet, sound,' for £216.; a 'female self- 
respecting chimpanzee, which runsi about the 
house at liberty,' for £40; and an alligator, three 
feet long, for 70s. 6d. Prices are ruling high, 
it appears, in menagerie stock as in other things, 
owing to the war." 

Still, we have the Grumbler and Anonymous 
Critic — I believe the few received emanated from 
the opposite sex. One complained it was all 
"Hamlyn"; very well, there is very little "Ham- 
lyn" in this number. The leading article, "The 
Group of Anthropoids — a Comparison," has been 
sent from Dublin. The proceedings of the Scot- 
tish Zoological Society naturally interest all my 
readers. A list of the Zoological Gardens in the 
world should prove useful to all. The particulars 



2 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



of the collection of pheasants of the late Dr. Pear- 
son is very interestsing. "General Notes" this 
month is somewhat curtailed. The arrivals have 
been few and far between, and the celebrities of 
the Animal and Bird World have escaped my 
notice. The subscription is 10'/- per annum, and 
if this second number comes up to your expecta- 
tion, I should be pleased to receive your subscrip- 
tion on enclosed form. 



The following Articles will appear from time to 
time as opportunity occurs : — 

"How I became a Naturalist." 

"Why I went to the Congo." 

"My Second Visit to the Congo." 

"Gorilla Dealing — Alive and Dead." 

"A true acount of the origination of the Wild 
Beast Business in Great Britain." 

"The Peculiarities of this Unique Business." 

"My Visit to South Africa." 

" The Advent of the Boxing Kangaroo and the 
Wrestling Lion. " 

"Concerning 'Peter,' one of the most famous 
Chimpanzees of the Age; also on the train- 
ing of Chimpanzees in general." 

"The Arrival and Landing of the Barnum and 
Bailey Show, 1899." 

" My Expedition to Dyers Islands, Cape of Good 
Hope, resulting in the capture of 125 Pen- 
guins and 12 Cape Sea Lions." 

"Ivory Buying in the French Congo." 

" Concerning the Water Elephant in the Fernan 
Vaz District, French Congo, obtained 
whilst visiting Sette Cama, S.W. Congo." 

" How I attempted to corner the Monkey Mar- 
ket thirty years ago, and lamentably failed." 



A FEW NOTES ON THE LATE 
DR. F. S. PEARSON, 

of Kingston Hill, who unfortunately lost his life 
whilst travelling with his xvife on the S.S. 
" Lusitania." 

By the courtesy of Mr. E. H. Pankhurst, who 
has had charge of the wonderful collection of 
Pheasants, Game Birds, Currassows and Poultry 
of the late Dr. Pearson, I am enabled to give my 
readers the following particulars. 

I have just been informed that the Zoological 
Society, Regents Park, have purchased the col- 
lection of Pheasants, comprising 2 pairs Impeyan, 
2, cocks 1 hen Peacock, 1 cock Siamese, 1 hen El- 
liott, 1 cock 2 hens Horsfields, 1 cock 3 hens Mon- 
golian, 1 cock Cheer, 2 cocks 3' hens Swinhoe, 2 
cocks 8 hens Reeve, 5 cocks 6 hens Amhersts, 3 
cocks 2 hens Japanese, 2 cocks 2 hens Formosan, 



21 cocks 4 hens Golden, 4 hens Prince of Wales, 3 
cocks 7 hens Silver, 1 hen Penelope, 2 pairs black 
Kaleege, 2 cocks 1 hen Veuillots, 1 cock Satyr 
Tragopan, 1 cock Temnincks, 1 hen Cabot, 1 
razor-billed Currassow, 2 crested Currassows, with 
a few hybrid Pheasants of no importance. 

My offer was .£76 cash for above: — a fairly rea- 
sonable one these times — so I take it the Zoologi- 
cal Society have exceeded that figure. 

Mr. Pankhurst has been wonderfully successful 
the last few years in rearing the rarer variety of 
Pheasants, and he has now several broods just 
hatched out. He not only hatches these delicate 
birds, but manages to rear them and keep them 
alive and in first-class condition for all time. This 
is more than can be said of other establishments. 

The rearing- of first-class Pheasants has been for 
many years past a profitable industry with our 
French neighbours, and why it cannot be so in 
this country requires thought and consideration. 
A Pheasant Farm conducted on the principles laid 
down by Mr. Pankhurst should be a very profitable 
undertaking. 



ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF 
IRELAND. 

The weekly meeting was held on Saturday, May 
22nd, Dr. R. R. Leeper (Vice-President) in the 
chair. The Secretary, referring to the Whitsun- 
tide holidays, said the Gardens would be open on 
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday at half-price. 
Gifts reported : — A merganser, sent by Mr. H. B. 
Rathbone; a pair of golden pheasants, Mrs. Hone 
Dyas; and vegetables from Colonel Sir Fred Shaw. 
Messrs. Walter Brown, Hanover Street, Mills, 
sent a horse for the carnivora. Mrs. Sealy, 6, 
Wilton Place, and Mr. Gerald Horan, were elected 
Members of the Society (life). Visitors to the 
Gardens for the week, 21,176'. 



RATS AT THE DOCKS. 

Last year 42,916 rats were caught at the Docks 
and on vessels arriving in the Port of London. Of 
these 2,716 were examined bacteriologically and 
not one was found showing any evidence of plague. 
The Port Sanitary Committee consider this most 
satisfactory, as during the previous five years rats 
infected with plague were found on several occa- 
sions. Since the; Corporation undertook the work 
of exterminating rats in the Docks 837,097 have 
been accounted for. In 1913 a conference was held 
with a view to taking measures to prevent the risk 
of plague arising within the Port of London. No 
serious attempt, the Medical Officer states, has 
been made to carry out these measures. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



ANTHROPOIDS. 



THE GROUP OF ANTHROPOIDS : 
A COMPARISON. 

There are at present in the Dublin Zoological 
Gardens three varieties of those apes which most 
nearly resemble man in their structure and appear- 
ance : the Gibbon from the neighbourhood of 
Malay, and the Chimpanzee and Gorilla from the 
West Coast of Africa. All of these are young and 
about the same age, so that a comparison between 
them may fairly be made. The Hoolock Gibbon 
from Burmah and North West India is most 
remarkable on account of the very long arms on a 
small slight body. These are so long that they 
touch the ground when it stands upright. When 
it walks upright, which it sometimes does, it 
commonly supports itself by 
the backs of its fingers on 
the ground although it can 
walk quite well with its 
hands held above its head. 
The face has a human ap- 
pearance than that of the 
other anthropoids, having a 
fair attempt at a nose and 
chin. A white band on the 
forehead is peculiar to this 
species. Its movements are 
remarkably quick and 
graceful, although the full 
extent of its abilities in 
jumping from bough to 
bough, almost like flying, 
cannot be seen properly in 
its cage, large though it be. 
Commonly, these animals 
are very docile. This par- 
ticular one was reared a 
pet, but has never changed 
from its first love. It is 
now more likely to inflict 
some injury on its visitors 
than to exhibit any mark of appreciation. The 
most apparent trait in its character is its ability to 
make a fearful noise which can be heard all over 
the Gardens. Its cry, which starts at dawn and 
continues on the slightest excuse all day until 
sunset, consists of a rapid series of whining barks 
ending in a falsetto ear-piercing shriek not to be 
forgotten by anyone who hears it at close quarters. 

In the cage adjoining the Gibbon may be seen 
the Gorilla and Chimpanzee together, while two 
other Chimpanzees occupy the neighbouring 
cages. The three Chimpanzees differ considera- 
bly, but not more than three children often do in 
one family; one shows boisterous humour, another 
quiet confiding playfulness, while the third has the 
gentler habits of a somewhat delicate child al- 
though at present in as good health as the other 




Dublin Zoo— GORILLA and CHIMPANZEE 



two, but all exhibit an equal amount of intelligence 
in their various actions. 

Stand awhile before the cage containing the 
Chimpanzee and Gorilla; a short time may well be 
spent watching the differences which exist between 
them. The Chimpanzee has very black hair and a 
comparatively light face, large ears, and extra- 
ordinarily mobile lips which can be protruded 
nearly a couple of inches when eating or when 
making a loud trumpet-like call. These animals 
can make very definite vocal soud's, and may be 
noticed also to make use of sounds produced by 
their hands on the cage walls, or by shaking the 
bars, in order to attract the attention of persons 
they recognise outside their cages. One we for- 
merly had made a buzzing sound by forcing air 
between his tightly held lips when he thought he 
should get something to eat. But it is very hard 
to make certain if any 
sound is used by different 
animals with the same 
object. Many of the inhabi- 
tants of the Monkey House 
make sounds which can be 
imitated, and to which one 
or sometimes others will 
respond, but it is not 
always that a fresh speci- 
men will recognise it. But 
even if the sounds which are 
made by the Chimpanzees 
are not speech, they answer 
their purpose by attracting 
attention. In other ways 
also it can easily be seen 
that the Chimpanzees are 
mentally far ahead of the 
other anthropoids. The 
quick definite actions and 
rapidity of thought, as well 
as the number of these ani- 
mals taught to perform on 
the stage, show that they 
are capable of receiving in- 
struction and profiting by it. "Sally," who lived 
in the London Gardens from 1883 to 1891, was 
taught to count straws, which it did quite accur- 
ately up to five, and fairly accurately up to ten. 
Watch any one of the three Chimpanzees. Very 
little passes which they do not sec. They recog- 
nise a friend as soon as the door of the Monkey 
House opens, and by extra activity and noise try 
to attract attention. 

So different from all this is the quiet morose 
Gorilla, quiet because of her apparent carelessness 
towards her surroundings. The Gorilla has some- 
what greyish or brownish hair, thick and short, 
giving a woolly look to her body and head, small 
ears, very wide nostrils, and a painfully human 
face when seen in certain aspects. She already 
shows she cannot be trusted like the others, and 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



when she bites is inclined to hold tight and shake 
her head in a way anything put playful. Notwith- 
standing the human look in her face, animal pro- 
pensities stand out more strongly than in any of 
the group. Her actions suggest stupidity, selfish- 
ness, and reliance on her enormous strength which 
though now present only to a small extent, will, 
as she seems to know, be much greater in the 
future. A fully grown Gorilla is one of the most 
formidable wild animals a traveller can meet with. 
The Dublin Gorilla 
never seems to be in a 
hurry. It eats very 
slowly and deliberately, 
spending a painfully 
long time, particularly 
at its supper, which it 
gets about 10 p.m., 
when the Superinten- 
dent, Dr. Ferrar, would 
naturally appreciate a 
little extra speed. At 
times it gives, evidence 
of a good deal of intel- 
ligence, so much so that 
one might suspect that 
its iniquities were inten- 
tional. Watch them at 
play. The Gorilla stands 
up and drums on its 
chest in the manner des- 
cribed by Du Chaillu in 
1861. This is its chal- 
lenge. The Chimpanzee 
runs to it. The Gorilla 
climbs the rope, careful- 
ly drawing up the end 
to prevent its being fol- 
lowed, but coming down 
again when it sees the 
Chimpanzee beginning 
to climb the ladder. 
Finally they meet. The 
Chimpanzee will easily 
get four or five blows 
delivered before the 
Gorilla has made up her 
mind what to do-, but 
when she succeeds in 
catching her adversary 
she pays off the old score 
with interest — often while the Chimpanzee lies 
quietly — as it has discovered that the bite is not 
so severe when it does not move. So the battle 
rages nearly all day. Every evening the honours 
appear even. 

Then sleep ! 

The Moralist seeing these things will think 

that he has seen similar actions going on 

round him amongst people who ought to 
know better. 



SCOTTISH ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 



EFFECTS OF THE WAR AND HIGHER 
COSTS. 




GORILLA. 



CONDITIONS OF THE CARNEGIE TRUST 
PROPOSAL. 

Lord Salvesen, who presided at the annual meet- 
ing of the Scottish Zoological Society, held in the 
City Chambers, Edin- 
burgh, said in present 
ing the annual report— 
which has appeared in 
"The Scotsman" — that 
the report on the revenue 
side was quite satisfac- 
tory. It was true that, 
when compared with the 
first nine months of 
the Society's existence, 
there had been less ac- 
cumulated surplus rev- 
enue for the past year, 
but that difference was 
more apparent than real, 
for when an outstanding 
item on last year's re- 
port was taken into ac- 
count the results were 
substantially identical. 
There had not been 
fewer people visiting the 
Park, nor had there 
been dissatisfaction with 
the laying out of the 
Park, or with the attrac- 
tions which were pro- 
vided; on the contrary, 
there had been a con- 
siderable increase of 
visitors, but this effect 
had been counterbal- 
anced in the first place 
by the expenditure due 
to the increased number 
animals, of which, at 
the end of last year, 
they had twice as many 
as at the end of the first 
nine months. That ne- 
cessitated additional keepers; and, in addition, 
they had increased cost of feeding stuffs. In 
regard to the rise for stocking the Park with 
appropriate animals, that, he was afraid, would 
always be a progressive rise if the Society was 
going to fulfil its functions. Had it not been for 
increased food for a greater number of animals, 
and also the increased price of the larger quantity, 
they would have been able to show a very large 
surplus. In the first three months their receipts 
were what they estimated, but the revenue side 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



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The Editor will be glad to receive for publication articles 
and all interesting photos, the imports and exports of all 
stock, and foreign adventures with all wild stock. The 
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suffered a loss after the outbreak of war, and they 
had to consider, too, the effect of the extremely 
bad winter. In all these circumstances, he thought 
they might congratulate themselves upon having 
a surplus on revenue at all, especially a surplus of 
£1,000. 

COST OF THE PROPOSED AQUARIUM. 

The situation was not so satisfactory on the 
capital side. After enumerating the works which 
had been put in hand, Lord Salvesen said the esti- 
mates were largely exceeded, as it seemed impos- 
sible to get accurate estimates for that type of 
work. As a result they had really to mortgage, 
so to speak, their surplus revenue for the present 
year, and take an overdraft on the bank. After 
the outbreak of war all prospects of generous 
donations were suspended for the moment, and 
they would have to rely for the work they had to 
do upon generous donors. The work in the im- 
mediate future would have to be very limited un- 
less they had the assistance of some public spirited 
citizens in Edinburgh. Proceeding to refer to the 
proposed gift by the Carnegie Trustees for an 
aquarium, Lord Salvesen said it seemed a very 
generous gift, but there were conditions attached 
to it — or at all events proposed to be attached to 
it — which made the Council, or the Executive at 
least, hesitate. It was suggested that the Society 
would have to maintain the aquarium, but that 
they should make no extra charge. He was afraid 
that, desirable though the aquarium was, it 
would not attract a number sufficiently great to 
compensate for the increased charges of its, main- 
tenance. That cost would be £500 annually, and 
at present they could ill-afford to shoulder the ad- 
ditional burden. In conclusion, Lord Salvesen 
moved the re-election of the five retiring members 
of Council, with the exception of Councillor Craw- 
ford, in whose place he moved the name of Miss 
Dorothy MacKenzie. Miss MacKenzie would be 
a valuable member of Council, as she had, he 
believed, visited nearly every zoological park in 
the world. 

Mr. J. C. M'Kechnie seconded the adoption of 
the report. 



COUNCIL MEMBER ON SERVICE. 

Mr. Andrew Miller asked if it were owing to 
Councillor Crawford's having taken up military 
duty that another member was moved in his place. 
Had Councillor Crawford attended to the business 
of the Council before his enlistment? Personally, 
had he been treated in a similar manner he would 
have felt it a slur upon him. He moved that 
Councillor Crawford be retained as a member of 
Council. 

Lord Salvesen said that for such a motion to be 
accepted it was necessary to have seven days' 
notice given to the secretary, and inquired whether 
Mr. Miller was speaking with a mandate from 
Councillor Crawford. 

Mr. Miller said that for the first time he met 
Councillor Crawford on a battalion march at Dal- 
keith on Saturday, and Councillor Crawford said 
he had never been spoken to about it, but had 
simply been dropped. 

Lord Salvesen said there was no depreciation of 
Councillor Crawford in his motion, but Councillor 
Crawford was now incapable of attending the 
meetings, and as it was sometimes difficult to get 
a quorum the motion was made. Had a member 
removed to< another part of the country a similar 
motion would have been made. 

After several other points had been raised, the 
report was adopted. 

Lord Strathclyde, in moving a vote of thanks to 
Lord Salvesen and the Council, paid a high tribute 
to work which his Lordship had done in this con- 
nection. It was an open secret, said Lord Strath- 
clyde, that the anonymous donor of the acclima- 
tisation house, which was such a valuable addi- 
tion, was Lord Salvesen. He desired also to as- 
sociate with Lord Salvesen the members of Coun- 
cil, and specially he would mention Councillor 
Crawford. He did not know Councillor Crawford, 
and held no brief for him, but he ventured to hope 
that when Councillor Crawford returned from the 
war his former associates would again re-elect him 
a member of Council (applause). Councillor Craw- 
ford, in his new work, was going to deal with 
"wild beasts," and it was quite appropriate that 
he should be entrusted with their care and atten- 
tion here (laughter). In regard to the position 
of the Society, he thought any Society at this 
time should be well pleased to< hold its own and 
keep the ground it had, for they could not expect 
people to put their hands in their pockets and hand 
over donations for any cause but one connected 
with the war. 

Lord Salvesen, in a few words of reply said 
that, speaking for himsef, he would be very glad 
to consider the suggestion which had been made 
in regard to the only matter which had stirred any 
diverse feeling in the meeting. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Many who took a deep interest in the prosperity 
of the newly-founded Zoological Park at Corstor- 
phine, near Edinburgh, feared that as a result of 
the war the enterprise would be seriously ham- 
pered. Happily, however, as the second annual 
report shows, this is not the case, and although 
the balance on the year's, working is less than on 
1913 — 14, it is extremely satisfactory, all things 
considered. The Zoological Park was opened in 
1913, thanks in large measure to the energy of Lord 
Salvesen (one of whose sons, we greatly regret 
to say, has recently been killed in action in 
France), and shows every prospect of becoming 
one of the finest gardens in Europe. Its site, on 
the southern slope of the wooded and rocky hill 
of Corstorphine, is a magnificent one, and lends 
itself especially well to the modern system of 
exhibiting animals in natural surroundings. Dur- 
ing the past year a great deal of work has been 
done. The principal donation is the new acclima- 
tisation house, presented by Lord Salvesen, at a 
cost of ,£1,100. Among other gifts is a new pen- 
guin pool, a sum of money for the purpose of form- 
ing a large paddock for eland and the larger ante- 
lopes, and two double aviaries. Many valuable 
animals have also been received. The acclimatisa- 
tion house is on novel lines. The cages are ar- 
ranged along a covered passage, which is dark, 
while the cages themselves are light. They are 
heated and communicate with outside shelters, and 
the heating is so arranged that the animals can 
choose the high temperature of the sleeping box, 
the lower temperature of the cage, or the cooler 
outside air. Owing to' the lighting, the animals 
are well seen, which the spectators are in dim 
light; thus the more timid animals are less dis- 
turbed. The house will be used for the accommo- 
dation of small mammals unable to stand our 
winter, and for the gradual acclimatisation of 
others. The penguin pool is excavated from rock 
near the polar bear pool, and forms a more appro- 
priate home for the valuable collection of penguins 
than the waterfowl pool in which they have hither- 
to lived. The polar bear pool has been much 
enlarged since last year, and most of the tem- 
porary work has been removed. The brown bear 
enclosure still requires some expenditure before 
it can be completed. The chief additions which are 
immediately required are a reptile house, esti- 
mated to cost £1,200, further aviaries, and deer 
yards. It is found that deer suffer in health when 
kept entirely in grass paddocks, owing to the 
fouling of the ground, and ! it is necessary to pro- 
vide stables with floors, macadamised or cemented, 
to admit of greater cleanliness. It is also desirable 
to extend the accommodation for wolves, etc, 
which are now in small kennels. These animals 
will be in future contained in a shrubbery which 
exists in the grounds. It is on a slope, and is filled 
with trees and undergrowth, which will be ad- 
mirably adapted to display these creatures to 
advantage. Another pool, a racoon enclosure, and 



a badger enclosure are also needed. Since the 
report was issued, it is announced that the Car- 
negie Dunfermline Trust has granted £8,000 for 
the purpose of building an aquarium in the park, 
which will materially enhance its usefulness. The 
present number of Fellows is 2,449, including 2l79 
names added during the year. The total number 
of persons who visited the Park during 1914 — 15 
was 2170,328, and the largest attendance on any 
one day 11,4221. The health of the animals has 
been very good and the mortality low, thus annull- 
ing the gloomy prognostications of those who 
doubted whether the fauna of the tropics could 
resist our Scottish winter. 



WAR AND WILD BEASTS. 



AN IMPROVEMENT IN THE DEMAND 
NOW REPORTED. 

At the beginning of the war there was a com- 
plete standstill in the wild beast trade, and mon- 
keys and foreign birds could be picked up for a 
mere song. Now things have changed. An 
"Evening News" representative was informed at 
Jamrach's, the East End animal dealer, that there 
is now an astonishing demand for birds, beasts and 
curios. Mr. Jamrach attributes it to the total 
stoppage of supplies. 

"Prices have reached a figure that I can never 
remember seeing them at before," he said. " Birds 
that were almost unsaleable for the first four 
months of the war are now at a great premium, as 
the following table of increased prices will show : 

Grey parrots (25s.) increase to £3. 

Senegal finches (Is. 6d.) increase to 15s. 

Brown's parrakeets (£8) increase to £16. 

Blue-fronted Amazons (25s.) increase to £4. 

Cockatoos (6s. 6d.) increase to £2. 

Eclectus (£4) increase to £8. 
The same applies to Japanese and Chinese china. 
Collections are now being formed with an eye to 
the future." 

Evening News. 



NO LIONS WANTED. 



FALL OF 80% IN PRICE OF WILD BEASTS 
CAUSED BY WAR. 



SMALL ZOO FOR £1,000. 
Lions, tigers, elephants and other wild animals 
now at large in tropical forests have reason to 
bless the present war ! There are no sportsmen to 
shoot or capture them and shipping companies 
will not be troubled to bring them to Europe. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



On the other hand, the inmates of zoological 
gardens in this country and on the Continent 
would not be pleased if they could hear what 
London animal dealers say — namely, that their 
value has since war began gone down no less than 
80%. This means that a lion worth £50 before 
the war could be bought to-day for a paltry £10 ! 

Mr. John D. Hamlyn, the well-known animal 
dealer, told "The Daily Mirror" yesterday that the 
trade in wild animals was almost completely at a 
standstill. 

"During the past few months I have had 
dozens of letters from people in France, Italy 
and Spain, offering me lions, performing bears, 
preforming snakes and wild beasts and birds of 
all kinds. It is impossible, however, for me to 
buy them, as there is nobody I can sell them to 
in Great Britain to-day. As a consequence the 
value of wild beasts of all kinds has gone down 
considerably — I should not think that 80% de- 
crease would be too high a figure." 

As an instance of the cheapness of animals at 
the present time the Melbourne Zoological Gardens 
has just bought the following remarkable men- 
agerie — it is almost a small zoo — for just over 
£1,000: — An African rhinoceros, a young African 
elephant, two black-maned lions, two Livingstone 
elands, several African leopards and jackals, four 
Barbary sheep and wild sheep, a twelve-foot 
python, giant owls, cranes, vultures, and other 
birds. 

Mr. R. I. Pooock, superintendent of the London 
Zoological Gardens, told "The Daily Mirror" that 
he was very curious to know what was happening 
to the inmates of the numerous zoological gardens 
in Germany. " Almost every town in that country 
has its own zoo," he said. "As time goes on I 
am afraid that many of the animals in Germany 
will have to be sacrificed, as every bit of fodder 
will be wanted for the horses. The carnivorous 
animals have, I should imagine, the same fate 
in store for them." 

Daily Mirror. 



[No one was more surprised than myself to read 
the above valuation of lions in "The Daily Mir- 
ror," 27th March last. One well-known Amateur 
immediately telegraphed for ten at £10 each, while 
another equally famous Menagerie Proprietor was 
very much disgusted, so much so that he cabled 
to Africa stopping a consignment of animals which 
were just about leaving for London. I made no 
prices for lions with that very energetic represen- 
tative of "The Daily Mirror." Fancy, £10 for the 
King of the Forest ! But then there are lions and 
lions, the same as cab horses and the finest racers. 
I am receiving shortly — see price list on end page 
— three adult 3 — i year old lions, with manes, in 



magnificent condition. Their value in normal 
times would be £150 each. I am commissioned to 
sell these at the very low price of £80 each. Oc- 
casionally I have had lion cubs from £20 to £30 
each, but £10 never ! I trust this explanation will 
satisfy the worthy Amateur, also my old and 
esteemed friend, Mr. E. H. Bostock, of Menagerie 
fame. — Editor.] 



THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS OF 
THE WORLD. 

A few years ago Capt. S. S. Flower, director of 
the Zoological Garden at Giza, made a tour 
through Europe for the purpose of inspecting the 
various gardens. He embodied his impressions in 
a report enumerating the chief points of interest 
in each, with regard to' the animals in the collec- 
tion, the methods of housing, with other informa- 
tion likely to be of service to his fellow directors 
and naturalists generally. Now, with the help of 
friends in both hemispheres, he has compiled a 
useful list of the zoological gardens of the whole 
world. In all 106 are set down, but twenty-two 
have been closed within the last few years, two 
have recently been started, and four (in India) 
appear to be the private menageries of native 
princes. These are arranged alphabetically under 
continents and in Europe under countries, the 
date of foundation and the name' of the director 
being added in almost every case. We must be 
content with a bare enumeration : — 

Africa. — Alexandria, Giza, Khartoum and Pre- 
toria. 

America (North). — Buffalo, Cincinnati, Chicago, 
Cleveland, Denver, Detroit, Milwaukee, New 
York (Central Park and Bronx Park), Phila- 
delphia, Pittsburg, San Francisco, Spring- 
field, St. Louis, Tacoma (free garden), Toledo, 
Toronto and Washington. 

America (South). — Buenos Aires, Para and Rio 
de Janeiro. 

Asia. — Bangkok, Bombay, Calcutta, Hanoi, 
Kioto (municipal garden), Saigon, Tokio 
(Government garden) and Trivandrum. Small 
zoological gardens also exist in India at 
Baroda, Jaipur, Kurachee and Lahore. 

Australia. — Adelaide, Melbourne, Perth and 
Sydney. 

There appear to be forty-one zoological gardens 
which are going concerns in Europe. They are 
distributed thus : — 

Austria. — Schonbrunn, Vienna. 

Belgium. — Antwerp. 

British Isles. — Clifton, Dublin, London and 
Manchester. Southport and the Cardiff Muni- 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



cipal Garden are entered, but not reckoned 
in the total. 

Denmark. — Copenhagen. 

France. — 'Marseilles, Paris (Jardin des Plantes, 
Jardin d'Acclimatation), and Lyons (entered, 
but not counted in the total). 

Germany. — 'Berlin, Breslau, Cologne, Dresden, 
Dusseldorf, Elberfeld, Frankfort-on-Maine, 
Halle-on-the-Saale, Hamburg, Hanover, 
Karlsruhe, Konigsberg, Leipsic, Mulhausen, 
Miinster, Posen, Stellingen and Stuttgart. 

Greece. — Athens. 

Holland. — Amsterdam, Hague, Rotterdam. 

Hungary. — Buda-Pest (temporarily closed, not 
reckoned in total). 

Italy. — Genoa. 

Portugal. — Lisbon. 

Russia. — Helsingfors, Moscow and St. Peters- 
burg. Warsaw is entered but not reckoned 
in the total. 

Spain. — Barcelona and Madrid. 

Sweden. — Stockholm . 

Switzerland. — 'Basle. 

This is by far the fullest list yet compiled, and 
the thanks of all interested in zoological gardens 
are due to Capt. Flower for the trouble he has 
taken to collect the information. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

That Messrs. Bostock and Wombwell's No. 1 
Royal Menagerie visited Neath on Saturday, 
May 2i2nd, and was well patronised. A more 
interesting collection of wild animals is impos- 
sible in any travelling exhibition. They have 
the only hippopotamus touring, which is in fine 
condition, and living under ideal conditions. 
Capt. Wombwell goes through a thrilling per- 
formance with his famous den of lions. Great 
credit is due to the staff for the cleanly manner 
in which the whole show is laid out. A word 
of praise is also due to the excellent band for 
which the old firm is noted for. The draught 
horses to the number of about thirty are alone 
worth seeing. Their Welsh tour deserves to 
meet with every success. 

That the arrivals in London steamers have been : 
ex Royal Albert Docks — 16 Macaque monkeys, 
2i pigtails, 2 Moluccan white-crested cockatoos; 
ex Gravesend — 11 Rhesus monkeys, 136 white 
Java sparrows; ex Southampton — a few Amazon 
parrots, 1 potto, 2! blue sugar birds, 2 canary 
winged parrakeets; ex Liverpool steamers — 12! 
Anubis baboons, 4 drills, 1 vervet, 2 caratrix, 
1 mangabey, 1 mona, and about 18 grey par- 



rots. One steamer left with a young gorilla 
which, unfortunately, died during the voyage. 

That the arrivals ex Rotterdam — Parkestone 
Quay have been only some 1,000 conaries dur- 
ing the past month; also 2l5 pairs Carolina ducks. 

That besides the above arrivals, the following 
have arrived at the Zoological Society's Gar- 
dens in Regents Park for the week ending May 
30th, 1915, include: — Birds: 1 rosella parra- 
keet, 1 ring-necked parrakeet, 1 yellow-winged 
sugar-bird and 1 peregrine falcon. 

That 7 Stanley cranes arrived this month from 
South Africa — a very unusual consignment. 

That 9 Stanley cranes arrived this month from 
Commons on Monkeys and Whisky. Mr. Lloyd 
George reminded the House of the actual experi- 
ment carried out by scientific men, not on them- 
selves, but on two monkeys, which he described 
as Monkey A and Monkey B, and the House 
followed the record of this essay in scientific 
research with an interest as absorbing as that 
of the monkeys. First of all they took Monkey 
A and deliberately made him drunk on raw 
whisky — and the result was that he became 
furious and jabbered and spat with rage. 
Then Monkey B was completely intoxicated 
on matured whisky. He succumbed, of 
course, but he was quite friendly and beaming. 
Of course, that did not necessarily prove any- 
thing, for A might have been naturally ill-tem- 
pered, and B naturally mild and polite. So a 
week lated the processes were reversed — both 
monkeys being apparently quite willing to have 
another "go." This time A had the old stuff, 
and was soon as benevolent as a bishop, though 
completely drunk. B was filled with raw whisky 
and was as offensive as — well, as some people 
used to be when Lloyd George's name was men- 
tioned in connection with insurance ! It was in 
vain that all this was related — it seems that one 
or two big firms resent the proposal that no 
whisky under three years old should be sold. 
The Government has got its Bill — but I suppose 
there will be all sorts of compensation. 

That Mr. Robert Leadbetter, Hazelmere Park, 
Buckinghamshire, a very well-knoAvn fancier, 
and lately proprietor of that well-found private 
Menagerie at the Crystal Palace, has kindly 
consented to write a series of Articles on 
"Foreign Animals as Domestic Pets." 

That Reviews of the following Publications are, 
unfortunately, held over until the July number 
for want of space: — "The Zoologist"; "The 
Amateur Menagerie Club"; "Bird Notes"; "The 
Illustrated Official Guide to the London Zoo- 
logical Society's Gardens in Regents Park, 13th 
Edition, 1915"; "Catalogue of the Zoo, Monk- 
Fry ston Hall, Yorks, together with a Short 
History of the Hall." 



Printed by W. J. Hasted & Son, (T.U.), 306, Mile End Road, London, E. 



Telegrams: Hamlyn, London Docks, London. 



Telephone : 6341 Avenue. 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East. 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station. 

Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence five minutes walk. 
P.O.O. payable at Ltman Street, East. Cheques crossed " London County &> Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TERMS. — NOTICE. — AH goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from time of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back. TELEPHONE.— Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS. — Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Pull name and address with every communication. DELIVERY. — Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

Australian, African and Indian arrivals are conspicuous by their absence. A few South American Parrots have certainly arrived. 
Australian and African small Finches are most eagerly sought for, the few specimens now changing hands are private property and 
command good prices. Small animals in general are unsaleable. Monkeys, however, are scarce. I have only sold fifty Baboons 
and Monkeys the last four weeks, whereas in normal times I should have disposed of three hundred. It had been my intention for 
some time past to pay a visit to the principal French Seaports with a view of purchasing small stock in general, but the formalities, 
restrictions, and delays are unbearable, being not conducive to good temper or quick travelling. 
American Consignments. — Never have I had so much trouble in obtaining American stock as at the present time. 
Grey Squirrels. — My collector in the States has forwarded me the rules of the Conservation law, which are as follows : — 

Black and Grey Squirrels — I. Open Season. Black and grey squirrels may be taken and possessed from September sixteenth 
to October thirty-first, both inclusive, except on Long Island, where they may be taken and possessed from November first to 
December thirty-first, both inclusive. No person shall take black or grey squirrels within the corporate limits of any city or 
village. 2. Limit. A person may take five such squirrels, either all of one kind or partly of each, in one day. Consequently 
my clients must wait until September. 
Horseshoe Crabs cannot be caught and shipped before July. Price 40/6. Skunks. — Forty were promised, but only twenty so 
far are ready for shipment. Snakes and Gila Monsters are at last on the way ; particulars on application. Californian 
Sea Lions.— Six beautiful specimens left New York on the 7th inst., and should arrive here about the I5th June. Price £30 
each. Two already sold to arrive. I have the assurance of the only Catcher, that there will be no other shipment to Europe 
this year. The Polar Bear and two adult Lions are sold. 



Rhesus Monkey, male, very tame, walks 
upright, make a wonderful regimental pet 
Anubis Baboon, medium size 
African Boa Snake, quiet to handle 
Brazilian Potto ... 
Prevosts Squirrel 

Californian Sea Lions, various sizes 
Camel, good worker, quiet, sound... 
Mouflon, black, curious breed 
Australian pure bred Dingoes 

i. >. >> Pups 

American Raccoons, large 
Indian Civet Cat... 
Dourocouli, very tame 
Alligator, three feet long ... 
English Fox Cubs 

Chinese white-eyed Mocking Bird... 
Indian white-crested Babbling Thrush 
Indian white-breasted Thrush 
Bishops, out of colour 
Zebra Finches, cocks only 
Budgerigars, cocks 3/- hens 3/6 

20 pairs for £5. 
Cockatiels, hens 12/6 cocks 10/6 
Pagoda Starlings, or Mynahs 
Blue Sugar Bird 
Lemon-crested Cockatoo ... 
Leadbetter Cockatoo 
Cormorants 
Heron, very fine ... 
Black and White Storks, tame 
Black Swans, males 60/- females 70/- 
White Swans ,, 20/- ,, 25/- 

All packages charged extra. 



each £5 
£5 



£3 
30/6 
£30 



60/6 
80/6 
40/6 





40/6 




40/6 




70/6 


each : 




20/6 


, 


25/6 


, 


25/6 




5/6 




4/- 


pair 5/6 


pai 


r 20/6 


each 1 


, 


30/6 


, 


25/6 


, 


60/6 


, 


12/6 


, 


20/6 


, 


40/6 


pa 


r £6 




£2 



pair £2 



20/6 
25/6 
40/6 



12 Peafowl, cocks 20/6 hens 25/6 

Packages charged for. 

3 Barheaded Geese, gander 50/6 goose 60/6 

7 Egyptian ,, ,, 12/6 ,, 15/6 

2 Whitefronted,, „ 20/6 ., 20/6 

12 Carolina Ducks drake 15/6 duck 20/6 

7 Common Wood Pigeons (6 months in stock) 
14 Jungle Fowls, cocks 10/6 hens 12/6 

6 Silver Pheasants, cocks 12/6 hens 16/6 
2 Mongolian ,, ,, 25/6 ,, 

8 Golden ,, ,, 16/6 
2 Amherst ,, ,, 20/6 
6 Swinhoe ,, ,, 30/6 
1 Caracara, very handsome birds, rare 
1 European Kestrel 

Macaw, red and blue 

Macaws, blue and buff 

Pair very fine Canary winged Parrakeets 

Note. — I might receive shortly a choice assortment of Foreign 
Birds, majority of which have been several years in open aviary, 
consequently, well acclimatised, and in good condition. 

ROLLER CANARIES. Voogts Strain. 

All these birds have given every satisfaction. 

Roller hens, I. Class, 3/- each. These match No, I. cock. 

Ordinary hens 2 for 4/- in wicker cage. 14 in 7 cages, 20/-. 
Roller cocks, I. Class, 12/- each, usually sold at 20/-, 30/- each. 

These are finest birds obtainable, having the waterbubble, 

Woodlark and Nightingale notes, soft, low, sweet notes of 

unheard of beauty. 
Roller Cocks, II. Class, 7/6 each, 7 in 7 cages 49/- Very fine 

Rollers of exquisite song, many being worth 10/- each. 
Roller Cocks, 111. Class, 6/6 each. 7 in 7 cages 42/-. Good sound 

serviceable birds, long notes, usually sold at 8/- each. 



pair 



each 
pair 



only 

for 
each 
for 



£5 
25/6 
40/6 
30/6 
10/6 
20/6 
25/6 
50/6 
30/6 
40/6 
65/6 
40/6 

5/6 
70/6 
60/6 
30/6 



c* 



^ 



Hamlyns 









Menagerie 
Magazine. 



I 



No. 3.— Vol. 1. 



JULY, 1915. 



Price Sixpence. 






CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTORY 

SOME NOTES ON SETTE CAMA 
SKUNK DEVELOPMENT 
WILD ANIMALS AS HOUSE PETS 
WATERFOWL IN REGENT'S PARK 
FILMS OF MY PET ... 
"JIM" WALMSLEY DEAD 
ADDITIONS TO THE ZOO ... 
GENERAL NOTES 



& 



aQc 



4 



Hamlps Jttenagerie JHagajto. 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 3.— Vol. 1. 



LONDON, JULY, 1915. 



PRICE SIXPENCE. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

The reception of the Second Number of our 
Magazine has been more favourable than we anti- 
cipated. There have been no anonymous com- 
munications in connection with that number. Mr. 
G. Tyrwhitt-Drake, of Cobtree Manor, writes 
under date, June 15th : — " I find your Magazine 
very interesting" — this coming from a gentleman 
so well known in the Menagerie World is encour- 
aging. Mr. A. D. Webster, the Superintendent 
of Regents Park, writes : — "Many thanks for your 
Magazine. The contents are most interesting, and 
I read them with pleasure. I shall be pleased 
to send you a note one day on some curious crosses 
amongst our waterfowl. Did I tell you the Crested 
Grebe came on to the Lake and remained some 
time with us — about three weeks?" 

David Ezra, Esq., of Calcutta, writes: — "Dar- 
jeeling, June 14th, 1915. I thank you very much 
for sending me a copy of your Menagerie Maga- 
zine, which is most interesting. I wish it every 
success. I came up here for a few weeks, to avoid 
the terrible heat, and go back shortly. Trusting 
Mrs. Hamlyn and you are very well, with all good 
wishes." 

"Le Chenilet L'Echo de L'Elevage", the official 
publication of the Jardin Zoologique d'Acclimata- 
tion, Paris, give us a very good notice for which 
I cordially thank the Editor. 1 will assure him 
that the future numbers will greatly excel those 
already published. The worthy Editor of "The 
Zoologist," in a very favourable review, expresses 
a wish thai Mrs. Hamlyn will publish at times 
some <>l her experiences with Chimpanzees. My 
wife makes her maiden effort at journalism in this 
number which I trust is appreciated. That a greal 
interest is taken in this publication is undoubted. 
1 he remarks made arc amusing. A worthy mem- 
ber of a certain Club remarked within the hearing 
of a friend of mine, "Will Hamlyn's Magazine 
survive three numbers?" Allow' me to inform 
that sarcastic individual that the Magazine will 
still go on, and I should like his opinion of this 
number. This intelligent member of the Amateur 
Club seems to forget that for twenty years past I 
have issued a Price List costing on the average £5 
monthly. I have been advised by the Trade and 



certain journalists to reduce the subscription for 
the first twelve months to 6/-. That has now been 
done. I quite appreciate their advice when they 
stated this was hardly the time for fresh publica- 
tions. They also advised a commencement of one 
of the promised Articles. It was my intention to> 
start with "Why I went to the Congo," but hav- 
ing had several letters asking about the Water 
Elephant, whether I saw one when at Sette Cama, 
I decided to commence the series of Articles with 
the one entitled, "Concerning the Water Elephant 
in the Fernan Caz District, French Congo, ob- 
tained whilst visiting Sette Cama, S.W. Congo." 
It should be distinctly understood that I shall be 
only too pleased to verify all statements made in 
any of the Articles. They will not please all those 
mentioned, but will nevertheless be true. 
Trusting to be favoured with your subscription in 
due course. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN (Editor). 
© ® © 

The following Articles will appear from time to 
time as opportunity occurs : — 

"How I became a Naturalist." 

"Why I went to the Congo." 

"My Second Visit to the Congo." 

"Gorilla Dealing — Alive and Dead." 

" A true acount of the origination of the Wild 
Beast Business in Great Britain." 

"The Peculiarities of this Unique Business." 

"My Visit to South Africa." 

"The Advent of the Boxing Kangaroo and the 
Wrestling Lion." 

"Concerning 'Peter,' one of the most famous 
Chimpanzees of the Age; also on the train- 
ing of Chimpanzees in generaj." 

"The Arrival and Landing of the Barnum and 
Bailey Show, 1899." 

"My Expedition to Dyers Islands, Cape of Good 
Hope, resulting in the capture of 125 Pen- 
guins and 12 Cape Sea Lions." 

"Ivory Buying in the French Congo." 

"How I attempted to corner the Monkcv Mar- 
ket thirty years ago, and lamentably failed." 

"An impression of the Zoological Gardens at 
Regents Park, Dublin, Bristol, Edinburgh, 
I falifax and Manchester." 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



SOME NOTES ON SETTE CAMA. 

Sette Cama, French Congo sea board, S.W. 
Africa, situated in 2.31.30 latitude, 9.44.0 longi- 
tude, being between Loango and Cap Lopez. This 
interesting settlement has still a very strong affec- 
tion from me, for here I spent some considerable 
time collecting Gorillas, Chimpanzees, Antelopes, 
Reptiles of every description, and the various 
birds inhabiting that wild region. Originally it 
was in the Portuguese possession, being a great 
centre of the slave trade, but even now some hun- 
dred miles in the interior domestic slavery still 
nourishes to this day. Men, women and children 
of a particular tribe, willingly sell themselves for a 
certain number of years to the coast natives. The 
purchase is affected by the handing over of a cer- 
tain number of highly coloured cloths, bangles, 
beads, salt and gunpowder. You must not think, 
gentle reader, this this Domestic Slavery of Ser- 
vice is any worse than Domestic Service here— the' 
only difference is that the African cannot pick 
and choose his owner, whilst the Lady Domestic 
here can do so. Whilst at Sette Cama several of 
these slave people were pointed out to me; they 
enjoyed the same privileges and food as the other 
natives, but I believe some portion of their earn- 
ings were given to their owners. After many 
years they acquire their freedom and, in their turn, 
purchased slaves or followers. 

Sette Cama is only a small setlement. It, how- 
ever, dates back as a trading station some hundred 
years. When I visited the place there were only 
four houses, or factories, on the beach, or rather 
on the clearing bordering on the beach. And what 
a beach ! — one of the worst on the African coast. 
There was the French House, Messrs. Hatton and 
Cookson's, and John Holt's, with, of course, the 
residence of the French Commandant. The Army 
of Occupation consisted of a detachment of Sene- 
galese, some twenty in number, in charge of a 
Sergeant who was with Major Marchant right 
through Africa, up to Fashoda, through Abys- 
sinia, home to Dakar. He was one of the finest 
Senegalese I ever set eyes on — a perfect soldier 
and a true man. Periodically, the Army of Occu- 
pation ran riot, of course on pay day only, during 
which time the few Europeans, some eight or ten 
in number, kept discreetly out of sight. During 
one of these celebrations my compound came into 
the line of fire, which greatly exasperated me. -One 
morning I noticed my boy, Oeuita, was rather dis- 
turbed, and was very chary of going down to the 
river for water. I enquired in somewhat forcible 
English, "What's the matter?" He replied with 
very great feeling, " Plenty palaver soon. Plenty 
damned row. Dem bad men Singalese come quick." 
"What for?" I enquired. "Too much Gin — Pay- 
day." Whilst wondering how this concerned me, 
I heard distinct sounds of rifle fire, and then, to 
my amazement, I saw some six sturdy Senegalese 
running across our ground towards the compound 



firing as they went. There was in the compound 
boxes of Gorillas, Chimpanzees, Antelopes, Mon- 
keys, Snakes, Birds, with Oeuita and myself all 
in line of fire. My first impulse was to use highly 
explosive Billingsgate on the foremost man, but 
my boy implored me to sit down and take things 
easy. He reasoned wisely and well — if you got 
shot, well you were shot, but don't get shot if you 
can help it. It appeared that at these times the 
Senegalese imagined they had a grievance with 
one of the French Company's staff, and to get 
even with him they beseiged him regularly. No 
. one was ever shot to my knowledge. I' was ex- 
tremely thankful when the firing party had passed 
the compound. On the following morning they 
came and, in most fluent French, apologised, hop- 
ing that I was not alarmed and everything was all 
right. The only thing to do was to accept their 
apology with good feeling and renewed friendship. 
I, however, decided to give the next celebration a 
go-bye, but the date slipped my memory. I just 
took things as they came, more firing, followed by 
more apologies. These joy-days certainly enliven 
the settlement. 

To be, however, fair to the settlement, I must 
say all this happened twelve to fifteen years ago. 
At the back of the settlement the River Cama runs; 
it flows down some miles from the interior, finally 
running into' the sea. A very large trade was done 
in log cutting, the natives cutting down the most 
suitable trees, sawing them into certain lengths, 
floating the logs down to the French River Beach, 
where they were hauled up and transported across 
to the sea beach ready for shipment. 

The Hinterland is also very rich in rubber and 
ivory, although since the French occupation the 
natives have been very chary in bringing down 
any quantity. The reason, I was told, was that 
the\- did not consider they received full value for 
these commodities. The Hinterland was occupied 
by a very war-like hunting tribe called the " Pan- 
guins." These people had not been subjugated 
by the French when I was there. It was a most 
wonderful difficult country to march in. There 
were very few clearings. The right of way con- 
sisted of brute force on a narrow hunting path. 
I was astonished at the beaut}- and density of the 
forest. The native clearings were most cunningly 
concealed. Their villages were hard to find. The 
elephant, hippopotamus, gorilla, chimpanzee, with 
various antelopes and other strange animals, were 
there in abundance. Yes, they were there; when 
passing through the forest you might be only 
twenty yards away from the ground animals, but 
it was impossible to see them. The gorillas and 
chimpanzees are found in the highest trees, where 
they build their huts; each family — and a family 
might consist of twenty to thirty specimens — keep 
entirely to themselves. They travel considerable 
distances from tree to tree. They only use the 
paths when searching for food or water. The 
gorillas are the superior tribe, they do not inter- 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



mingle with chimpanzees or other monkeys. The 
finest gorilla country in the world is that between 
Cap Lopez and Eernan Vaz. That is Gorillaland. 
Whilst chimpanzees are found so far down as 
Sierra Leone and Conakry, the gorilla has not 
been found below the Gaboon and Gamerun dis- 
trict. The shooting and capture of the gorilla 
requires great courage. The Nature Hunter, 
armed with an old blunderbuss or ancient shot 
gun, will proceed along the paths frequented by 
the gorillas. They are down hunting for berries 
and wild fruit. They stand perfectly erect when 
approached by a human being. The hunter, when 
meeting the gorilla, is greeted by wild cries, also 
by the animal beating its breasts, thereby causing 
a sound as of beating on many drums. The 
Hunter deliberately points his weapon at the ani- 
mal's breast; the gorilla's one aim is to wrench 
the gun away and, to do so, places, the barrel in 
its mouth, with a view to crunch it; that is the 
one time when the shot must be fired — any hesi- 
tation, and the Hunter is lost — torn limb from 
limb. The above description was given me by a 
very old trader who had the facts given him by 
his own hunter. I am well aware this method of 
shooting has been severely criticised; nevertheless 
it is true. 

[To be continued in our next, when the account of the 
" Water Elephant " will be given.] 



SKUNK DEVELOPMENT. 

Below is an exact copy of a circular now issued 
by a certain Syndicate in the United States. For 
originality it Avould take a lot of beating. I have 
attempted most things in this business, but the 
Circular below is far in advance of anything I 
could produce in connection with the Live Stock 
Business. By the time this appears in print, I 
shall have received twenty of these precious ani- 
mals. They are precious, being surrounded by 
every conceivable extortionate charge of the 
"American Forwarders." I was politely told, 
"Have them or leave them." Well, I have them. 
The price is only five pounds each, being practi- 
cally cost. Here is the precious document: — 

Dear Sir,— As you have shown an interest in 
live stock we wish lo remind you, if you are not 
already a Fur-Farmer, that now is the best time 
to make a start. Black Skunks bring large profits 
and are easily raised. The Skunk is by nature 
semi-domestic and is therefore not so difficult to 
manage successfully as some of the more timid 
animals. Yfou can easily get some young Skunks 
this Spring by digging out a couple of litters, so 
your breeding stock will cost you nothing. 

Learn to remove the scent sacs and thus avoid 
all complaints of neighbors and any personal in- 
convenience. If you learn to do this you can sell 



your striped Skunks for pets or curiosities and in 
this way get good prices though the skins would 
be of small value. We can furnish breeding stock 
with scent sacs removed so you can start now. 

As we are asked certain questions so often we 
are pleased to give below answers to those most 
frequently received : — 

What is the best way for me to start raising 
Skunks for fur? Start with a few and increase 
the number as you care for them. Dig out or cap- 
ture a couple of litters this Spring. Mate the 
Males of one litter with the females of the other 
litter. There are usually eight to ten young in a 
litter. The old skunks mate about March 1st and 
the young are born about May 1st. Remove the 
male before the young are born. Furs are becom- 
ing scarcer and prices are continually advancing. 
Those who start early in this industry will make 
the most money. 

How can I breed for Black Skunks? Each year 
save your largest and blackest skunks to breed 
from. Market the skins of all the rest when 
prime. Be always on the lookout for blacker 
specimens, especially males. You can mate one 
black male to four or five females and even if the 
females are not entirely black there will be a good 
percentage of blaek among the young. 

What should I feed Skunks? Skunks in con- 
finement will eat meat of any kind, bread, skimmed 
milk, many sweet fruits, green corn and some 
other vegetables. Table leavings from hotels,, 
waste from slaughter-houses, dead farm stock or 
dead chickens are all eaten readily and take the 
place of the beetles, grubs and mice which the 
skunk lives on when free. Do not give decaved 
food. Supply fresh water regularly. 

I live in town; Can I keep Skunks without the 
scent disturbing my neighbors? Yes. You can 
remove the scent sacs from your skunks. This is 
very easy to do and the skunks do not mind it at 
all. They do not lose a meal. After the, scent 
sacs are removed the}' can never scent again. 
Your neighbors will not know you are raising 
skunks unless you tell them. We will send expert 
to remove scent sacs at $10' per day and expenses 
if you wish- Send 30 cents in stamps for our illus- 
trated book of complete instructions for removing 
scent sacs without spilling scent. It is easy to do. 

How long does it take to remove the scent sacs? 
With a little practice you can remove the scent 
sacs and make a skunk forever scentless in four 
or five minutes, or at the rate <>l 75 to 100 skunks 
per day. 

Docs an) of the scenl fluid escape when remov- 
ing the scent sacs? Not with our method. With 
our instruments you can remove both scent sacs 
complctelv without spilling a drop of the scent 
fluid. 

(To be continued.) 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



WILD ANIMALS AS HOUSE PETS. 



THE WOLF. 

By Hugh S. Spencer, B.A. 
This creature was in former times an exceed- 
ingly ancient inhabitant of our country. His bones 
"have been found in river channels, peat-rosses, 
and the floors of caverns. The jaw-bone of the 
primaeval wolf was furnished with chisel-edged 
teeth larger in proportion to the size of the bone 
than are the teeth of the dog. It is said that the 
wolves inhabiting a continent like Europe are 
larger and stronger than those which roam over 
a small island. This is because they have more 
room to move about in, and consume more food. 
Anglo-Saxon literature contains several allu- 
sions to the wolf. He is described as following 
armies on the march in order to devour the slain. 
Accompanying him were the white-tailed erne, 
and other birds, such as the kite, raven and gos- 
hawk. The long and devastating wars through 
which England has passed caused a great increase 
in the number of her feral inhabitants such as 
wolves. It is said that these creatures prowled 
through the great forest of Andred in Kent and 
Sussex during the eleventh century. This forest 
was 120 miles long and 30 broad, and what is now 
the Brighton Road from London passes over the 
ground it formerly covered. In northern England 
also during the reign of William I. a Norman 
baron named D'Umfraville: was given land on the 
understanding that he was to clear the district ad- 
joining of these ravenous beasts. In the time of 
Stephen, that is the twelfth century, we read of 
wolves in South Wales. It has been stated that 
it was not till Henry VII. 's reign that the wolf 
became extinct in England. It lingered in Scotland 
till the close of the seventeenth century, and in 
Ireland into the eighteenth. 

Byron's lines thus depict the wolf : — 
41 All night I heard them on the track, 
Their troop came hard upon our back, 
With their long gallop, that can tire 
The hounds' deep hate and hunter's fire. 
Whe'er we fled they followed on, 
Nor left us with the morning sun; 
Behind I saw them scarce a rood 
At daybreak winding through the wood, 
And through the night had heard their feet, 
Their stealing, rustling, step repeat." 
There are still wolves in Russia and other parts 
of Europe. In Russia every wolf, it. is stated, 
costs the nation £11 annually. However, wolves 
are no longer the objects of dread thev formerly 
were among the peasantry. The superstitious 
fears of which the wolf was the subject have to 
a great extent vanished. His numbers have 
diminished by reason of the increase of population, 
tillage, and of improved weapons of precision. 
Nevertheless the war which is existing will cer- 



tainly, if it continues long, cause an increase in 
the number of wolves in those parts of Europe 
where thev still are to be found. 



WATERFOWL IN REGENT'S PARK. 

By A. D. Webster. 

Large numbers of waterfowl both native and 
introduced find a congenial home on the Lake, and 
its Islands, the latter, especially by the Northern 
end, being quite a sanctuary and breeding ground 
for many of the rarer kinds. At times, as many 
as three hundred waterfowl may be seen on the 
Lake but the numbers fluctuate greatly with the 
particular season of the year and arrivals from 
and departures to other waters in the Metropolis. 

Of the rarer Geese, about a dozen kinds succeed 
well, while nearly double that number of distinct 
species of duck are usually to be found. As well 
as these, several species of Swan, including the 
rare and distinct Bewicks, the Cormorant, blue 
and common Coot, greater and lesser Grebe, 
Water-rail, Heron, and many others of interest, 
are included in the collection. The extremely rare 
and pugnacious Bittern was introduced but it is 
untameable and like the great diver made off to 
more congenial surroundings. Several of the 
rarer and most beautiful of the duck family do well 
including the Mandarin, Carolina, Sheldrake 
(common, ruddy and Australian), Rosybilled, 
Shoveller, Gadwall, and at least four species of 
Teal, including our native bird — the smallest and 
neatest of all. 

Amongst desirable Geese, the Sebastapol is one 
of the most curious owing to the recurved feathers 
of the back and sides, while its propensity for 
crossing with almost every other species is well 
known. The Chinese is a handsome stalwart 
fellow that breds regularly on the Lake, though 
the same may be said of the Brent and Barnicle, 
the Pinkfooted, Egyptian, Canadian and barred, 
the latter one of the neatest and prettiest of the 
tribe. 

Of crossbred waterfowl the most interesting are 
the produce of the Canadian and Sebastapol, the 
grey log and pinkfooted geese while several 
species of duck have also produced interesting 
crosses, particularly that of the mallard and 
pochard. 

Kingfishers visit the Lake frequently, but do 
not breed, probably owing to the want of suitable 
surroundings, though the lesser grebe has reared 
its young as has the Coot and Moorhen. The 
Carolina duck has nested on several occasions, as 
has the pintail, tufted diver and pochard. 

From their diving feats the tufted and pink- 
eyed divers give much pleasure to the public, while 
the Cormorants afford considerable amusement by 
reason of their remaining so* long beneath water 
and rarely coming to the surface without their 
quarry. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



The black swans breed regularly, so do the white 
but the rarer Bewick species has not so far inclined 
to nest. Twice in the early morning' I have seen 
the Sandpiper on the Lake, while during Winter 
at least three species of gull frequent these waters. 
Towards evening a heron may often be seen mak- 
ing its way to the pond in the grounds of the 
Botanical Society, while for lengthened periods 
another takes up its abode on one of the Islands of 
the Lake, attracted no doubt by the number of fish. 

British birds are well represented in the Park, 
especially when the generally unfavourable con- 
ditions are taken into account, and one day I may 
give a note on the rarer and most interesting 
species. 



Hamltm's JE*nag*ru JHarja^im. 

Published on the 15th of each month. 



Editorial and Business Office (pro tern) : — 

221, ST. GEORGE'S STREET, LONDON, E. 
Telephone: Avenue 6341. 
Telegrams : " Hamlyn, London Docks, London." 

Advertisement Rates, very reasonable, on application. 

The Editor will be glad to receive for publication articles 
and all interesting photos, the imports and exports of all 
stock, and foreign adventures with all wild stock. The 
subscription is 6/- per ann., or 6d. per copy, post free, 
which will be sent under cover. The success of the 
Magazine depends entirely on the support given by the 
general public. Kindly fill up and return the enclosed slip. 



FILMS OF MY PET: CHIMPANZEE PETER. 

TAKEN AT 221, ST. GEORGE'S STREET, 21st JUNE, 1915. 







Having Brenkfas 



Kissing Mothc 



Cleaning Teeth. 







Being Washed. 



Putting on Boots. 




-, 




Looking for the Huns. 



Giving Mother a bit. 



In full Kit. 



Ending the day with a drink 



The above very interesting films will be shewn at 
Hammersmith first w : eek in August. "Peter" is 
about 2.', years old, very intelligent, as can be 
observed in above pictures, behaves exactly as a 
spoilt child when at liberty in the house. " Peter" 
is of an extremely jealous disposition, guarding 
me from all and sundry. He periodically chases 
the maid-of-all-work down the stairs, and also 
shews great animosity towards "Jan," my Belgian 
Griffon. He makes a great fuss of every telegraph 
messenger, but dislikes the representative of the 
purveyor of milk. Rises every morning about 
7.30, and is only too pleased to retire to resl in 



sleeping suit at 7.30 p.m. His diet consists of 
whatever is cooked for the household, with plenty 
of fruit and milk ad lib. "Peter" arrived in this 
country in March last, after a long journey through 
the Congo forest. His owner entered Africa on 
the East Coast, came through the forest, down the 
Congo River to Mataddi, where they shipped for 
England, landing at Plymouth after a stormy pas- 
sage. On some future occasion I shall relate to 
the readers of this Magazine further interesting 
notes on the many Chimpanzees that have passed 
through my hands. 

(Mrs.) L. HAMLYN. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



"JIM" WALMSLEY DEAD. 

SAD END AT THE TOWER. 




Photo by J. P. Bamber. 
The Late Mr. JAMES WALMSLEY. 

It is with great regret that I record the untimely 
death of Mr. James Walmsley, otherwise known 
as "Jim," of The Tower, Blackpool. My first 
acquaintance with "Jim" was some thirty years 
ago, when manager of the old Aquarium, then the 
property of Dr. Cocker, and from that time to the 
present. I am pleased to say that friendship con- 
tinued. The last time we met was at "The Won- 
der Zoo," Olympia, in January, 1915. I well 
remember a visit to The Tower some many years 
ago, when I certainly had the surprise of my life. 
After being shown round the building, "Jim" very 
gleefully instructed me to follow him upstairs; 
this was on the third floor of a building adjoining 
The Tower, where on entering to what appeared 
an empty lumber room, I found myself within 
three yards of a full grown lioness absolutely at 
liberty. I am not oxer nervous of lions as a rule, 
but the suddenness of finding a full grown playful 
lioness alongside of you, anxious to be fondled 
and caressed, certainly gave me a fright. "Jim" 
enjoyed the joke hugely, and later on I discovered 
that he allowed this animal the free use of the 
stairs with other rooms to roam about at leisure. 
On another occasion I accompanied several of the 
Directors of the Tower and Mr. Walmsley on 
their very first visit to Antwerp. It was the day 



of the Annual Sale. The following day we ex- 
plored the City. One building in particular at- 
tracted our attention; it was extensively advertised 
as "The Grand Circus." Just what we. wanted ! 
Having paid 5 centimes entrance, we discovered 
the "Grand Circus" to consist of a circus ring, 
in which there were six or eight broken-down 
saddle horses for riding purposes. We all mounted 
with the exception of Dr. Cocker. The band then 
started. We also started, for the horses kept 
pace with the music, round and round, occasion- 
ally a trot, then a gallop, and vice- versa; I was 
extremely thankful when that performance finished 
for you had to sit out the music, willing or not;;! 
If I remember rightly, "Jim" was the best horse- 
man and performer on that occasion. 

From the carious Lancashire papers I submit 
the following reports : — 

The Blackpool Tower Company has lost one of 
its most valued heads of departments by the tragic 
death of Mr. James Walmsley, the chief engineer 
and also the controller of the valuable stock 
in the menagerie and aquarium — who was found 
drowned in one of the filter beds connected with 
the aquarium tanks in the Tower, shortly before 
nine o'clock yesterday morning. It is assumed 
that as he was walking over the planking that pro- 
vides a footway across the filter bed for workmen, 
he stumbled and fell into the water. The accident 
must have occurred some time during the night 
or early morning, because Mr. Walmsley was seen 
as happy and jovial as ever on Wednesday evening 
by members of the staff, whom he met on then- 
return from a motor char-a-bancs trip to Ilklev. 
It had been Mr. Walmsley 's custom for many 
years to walk through some part of the building 
premises ever since the Tower was opened, and 
was more familiar with everv inch of it than anv 
other member of the staff — and it was nothing 
unusual for him to look through the building in 
the earl\- morning before the workmen put in their 
appearance. A certain number of the staff, ^it 
seems, were in the habit of reporting themselves 
to Mr. Walmsley each morning' when they came 
on duty, so as to receive, instructions about any 
work that might require first attention. Yester- 
day morning, Mr. Walmsley was not about, and 
there was no respo.ise when a visit was paid to his 
room. His daughters naturally thought he would 
be somewhere about the building, but it was not 
until close upon nine o'clock that Jas. Mason, a 
young workman, discovered Mr. Walmslev's dead 
body in the filter tank. The discovery was so un- 
expected that it was a few minutes before the 
young man recovered from the shock of finding 
that the body was lifeless. 

The deceased was born on April 25th, 1849, in 
a cottage in the court which formerly abutted on 
St. Anns Street, on the site of which the "Gazette 
News" Works now stand. He was born of a. plum- 
ber and painter, and it is interesting to note that 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



the business he founded is still carried on by other 
members of the family, in Birley Street. "Jim" 
was apprenticed to his father, but while he was 
still in his teens, Dr. Wm. Henry Cocker, the 
"Father of Blackpool," induced him to transfer 
his services towards assisting in building up the 
old aquarium and menagerie. His place there 
became permanent, and he was employed on the 
same site continuously right up to the time of his 
death — first by Dr. Cocker, then by the Central 
Promenade Company, and subsequently by the 
Blackpool Tower Company. 

His care for the wild animals exhibited in the 
menagerie, was solicitous almost to a fault. He 
went over to the Continent on many occasions to 
secure additions to the Tower Company's fine col- 
lection, and he introduced several new specimens 
that had rarely been caged in this country before. 
His success in attending to them until they were 
thoroughly acclimatised, and in "nursing" them 
through occasional illnesses, sometimes very 
severe, was remarkable. It is also credited to Mr. 
YValmsley that at no other menagerie in the coun- 
try have more lion cubs been born and success- 
fully reared than at the Tower. 

He leaves a widow — who was staying at Elswick 
at the time of the tragic occurrence — and three 
daughters, one of whom is married. 

The interment took place at Blackpool Cemetery 
on Saturday afternoon, 19th June. 

The funeral was attended by very many sympa- 
thetic friends, and there was also a large gathering 
of the general public both at the Cemetery and in 
the vicinity of the deceased's residence, Bank Hev 
Street. Many blinds were drawn in this thorough- 
fare. 

The wreath from the Chairman and Directors 
of the Tower Company bore the following inscrip- 
tion : — 

Life's race well run, 
Life's work well done, 
Life's crown well won; 
Now comes rest." 

And now just one last word from one you knew 
so well : — 

"Adieu, mon Ami, until we meet again." 

JOHN 1). HAMLYN. 

ADDITIONS TO THE ZOO. 

\i the monthlj general meeting of the Zoolo- 
gical Society of London held yesterday, the Duke 
of Bedford, president, in the chair, Colonel Sir 
Reginald Hennell, Lieutenant-Colonel G. H. Loch, 
Major Henry M. Kersey, the Rex. Charles II.' 
Brooklebank, Messrs. Bernard Allien, Edward 
Barrett, William Barnard, Arthur Du Cros, M.P., 
Augustine Fitzgerald, John G. Le Brun, Edward 
B. Lumb, Frank Mason, Dr. fames Musgrave, 
Michael L. My, is, Charles F. Simond, Michael 
II. Icmplc, Albert Vandam, Mrs. fanel A. Boyd 
Mrs. Charlotte Carter, Mrs. Louisa M Calverlev 



Mrs. Mar)- L. Coast, and Mrs. Janet M. Jervase- 
Hatt were elected Fellows of the Society. The 
report of the council for the month of May stated 
that there had been 136 additions made during 
that month to the society's menagerie, viz., 66 
presented, 9 purchased, 14 deposited, 35 received 
in exchange, and 12 born in the Gardens. 

The report also stated that the number of visi- 
tors to the Society's Gardens during May had 
been 127,066, and the receipts for admission had 
amounted to £2l,753 15s. 7d., that the total num- 
ber of visitors during the year up to the end of 
May had been 348,018, and the receipts for admis- 
sion had reached ,£7,173, showing a decrease of 
£1,189, as compared with the corresponding 
period in 1914, and an increase of £266 as com- 
pared with the average for the corresponding 
period of the previous ten years. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

That it will grieve the amusement public in 
general to know that "Max" and "Moritz," 
those two world-famous Chimpanzees, are dead. 
They were a very great attraction at the Won- 
der Zoo at Olympia, December — January last. 
Their old friend and trainer, Mr. Reuben Cas- 
tary, is now, unfortunately, a prisoner of war at 
Rutheglen. Germany. From all accounts I hear 
he is taking his detention in good part. 

That the marriage took place on Thursday, June 
24th, at St. Mary's Cathedral, Glasgow, 'of' Mr. 
John R. W. Bostock, youngest son of Mr. E. 
H. Bostock, to Miss Jennie Bonnar of Ottowa, 
Canada, and formerly of Paisley. Mr. Gus 
Bostock acted as best man. The bridegroom 
has for some time been manager of his father's 
touring menagerie. 

That the Jardin Zoologique d'Acclimatation, Bois 
de Boulogne, Paris, have succeeded in rearing 
the young sea lion born there on the 12th June 
last. It is seldom these animals breed in cap- 
tivity. The youngster has been christened 
"Desiree." 

That a subscriber points out that the only Zoo- 
logical Garden in Italy is the one in Rome, a 
beautiful garden, established since six years. 
In Genoa there is not a Zoo, but only two cages 
with 2 servals and monkeys in "the Public 
Square. 

That there arrived in Liverpool on a steamer from 
the S.W. coast of Africa, 5 peachfaced love- 
birds, 6 grey parrots and 121arge weavers. The 

local dealer \\ ho purchased the lot, writes : "The 
first peachfaced al this pari lor main a year." 

That I also received peachfaced love-birds dired 

from Portugal, males and females, in good con- 
dition. 

Thai the additions to the Zoological Society's 
menagerie lor the week ending June 26th include 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Mammals : 1 genet, 1 Caucasian ibex, and 4 
hybrid mouflons. Birds : 2 ocellated turkeys, 3 
kingfishers, 2 pink-footed geese, 2 male swans, 
and 1 black-backed piping crow. 

That there arrived on the s.s. "Omiah" from Aus- 
tralia on June 21st, consigned to a Mr. Brown, 
of Holland Park, 1 king parrot, 1 golden 
shouldered parrakeet, 1 port lincoln, 1 toir par- 
rakeet, all in good condition. 

That on the Calcutta steamer there was a very 
fine Lapunda ape consigned to> Mr. Henning, 
also 2 Alexandrine parrots and a tame mongoose 
for myself. 

That on the "Crosby Hall" from Calcutta, there 
were 2 Burrhel sheep, 1 Pallas cat, 4 flying 
squirrels (only 1 arrived alive), 1 case small 
birds. It appears the gentleman who sent these 
over — I believe for a Northern Zoological Gar- 
dens — went from East Africa with some lion 
cubs which he sold in Bombay; there were also 
some hybrid zebus whose destination has not 
yet been determined. It seems 2150 rupees was 
paid for the Pallas cat, besides 100 rupees 
freight. Another bright example of amateur 
trading; the ordinary value of a Pallas cat being 
six pounds. 

That an English steamer which called at Marseille 
last week sold a few monkeys there at 12 francs 
each. 

That on the s.s. "Saxon" from South Africa, 12 
crested cranes arrived for the Zoological Gar- 
dens, Regents Park, said to be presented by His 
Grace the Duke of Abercorn. They were in 
magnificent condition. 

That on the s.s. "Derbyshire" from Rangoon, 
there arrived 1 Sambhur deer. Two, however, 
were shipped by a Mr. Holman Hunt. My agent 
is not quite sure as to the exact variety of deer. 

That the arrivals in Southampton have been prac- 
tically nil, two or three monkeys only. 

That the arrivals from the Continent have been 
some cormorants, herons, macaws, toucans and 
few waterfowl. 

That the following has been sent me from South 
Africa : — " Interest in the ostrich as a revenue 
producer is now at the lowest possible ebb in 
South Africa (says the American Consul at Port 
Elizabeth), and birds are dying by thousands 
from lack of food and attention. Ostriches are 
now of such little account and value that the 
poundmaster at Jansenville has written to the 
Council asking permission to* refuse ostriches in 
the pound. It is said that a fullgrown cock 
ostrich which had found its way to the, Grahams- 
town pound was, on being put up to public 
auction on the market, sold for the magnificent 
sum of threepence." 

That the following is from an Australian paper 
published in the Walgett District : — 



DESPERATELY DIVING FOR DINNER. 

The drought in the backblocks has been res- 
ponsible for many weird stories. Stock have 
been reported as seen eating dead rabbits or 
even the wrappers off jam tins around the shep- 
herds' huts. Drovers have stated that they had 
to keep the horses which they were riding on the 
move, because the starving- sheep would sneak 
up behind their geegees and commence to fren- 
ziedly nibble the hair off their fetlocks, and 
similar hair-raising tales. But the latest corker 
comes from the Lower Gwyder District., A man 
named J. M. Keogh writes in all seriousness to 
a country paper that there is not a blade of grass 
for hundreds of miles, and that horses swim in 
the river and dive after the weeds at the bottom 
like ducks after fish. 

My informant also writes: — "The district 
council gives threepence a head for crows, 2/6 
for eagle-hawks, 2/6 for foxes, 40/- for dingoes, 
but there are very few of the latter about here. " 
The above-mentioned have been destroving the 
lambs on the farms, hence their destruction. 

That Mr. Robert Leadbetter's article for August 
is on the subject of Lions. This gentleman has 
been the largest holder of lions of any past or 
present amateur. My readers will find his arti- 
cle very interesting reading. 

That a contributor who desires to remain anony- 
mous has sent an article on "Jack, the Monkey 
Man," which will also appear in August. "Jack" 
was a well-known wanderer in the Norfolk and 
Suffolk districts. 

That I consider congratulations are due to Mr. 
Frank Finn for the very able manner in which 
he edits "The Zoologist." The June number is 
full of most interesting matter, which should 
bring this Magazine before every Amateur and 
Collector. 

That "The Amateur Menagerie Bulletin" contains 
a short article entitled " Some Hints on Feeding 
Carnivora," by the Secretary, which is very 
instructive. 

That I shall defer my remarks on the Zoo at Monk 
Fryston Hall, Yorkshire, until I pay my long 
promised visit. 

That I am pleased to state at some later period 
Sir Leo Chiozza Money, M.P., will contribute a 
short article on " Foreign Birds and Bird Keep- 
ing." 

That it is always sad to mention the death of any 
customer, but it is with the greatest possible 
regret that I insert the following from a daily 
paper :—"Lady Edith Douglas-Pennant has re- 
ceived news leaving no doubt that her husband, 
the Hon. Charles Douglas-Pennant, of the 
Guards, who has been missing for some time, 
was killed on October 29." The Lady Edith ond 
the Hon. Charles Douglas-Pennant were fre- 
quent callers here, and the Lady Edith has our 
deepest sympathy. 



Printed by W. J. Hasted & Son, (T.U.), 306, Mile End Road, London, E. 



Telegrams: Hamlyk, London Docks, London, 



Telephone : 6341 Avenue. 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station. 

Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence fiye minutes walk. 
P.O.O. payable at Lemon Street, East. Cheques crossed " London County &> Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TERMS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from time of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back. TELEPHONE.— Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS. — Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIVERY. — Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

Sea Lions. — Six were shipped on the S. S. '• Minehaha," which I see by the daily papers, caught fire from some explosion, and has 
gone to Halifax. I ask my buyers to have patience, for, doubtless by the time this appears, I shall be able to state definitely 
whether 1 can deliver or not. Should these however be lost, others will be cabled for to complete orders. The same remarks 
apply to the other American stock. 

The following is the American stock on the way: — 
6 Sea Lions ... ... ... ... £30 each i 100 American, Pine, Bull, King Snakes from 25/- to 45/- each 

6 Gila Monsters, Heloderma suspectum ... £4 ,, 20 ,, Skunks, disarmed ... ... £5 ,, 

I 40 Horseshoe Crabs „ ... ... £2 „ 



4 Rhesus Monkeys, large, tame, 

4 Mangabeys, ,, 

4 Ringtails 

2 Lemurs... 

2 Anubis Baboons, large 

1 Chimpanzee, Male, good size, on collar and chain 

1 ,, Female, very large, Eight years old 

1 Kangaroo 

1 Brazilian Potto ... 

6 Californian Sea Lions, various sizes 

1 Camel, good worker, quiet, sound... 

1 Mouflon, black, curious breed 

2 Australian pure bred Dingoes 

3 „ ,, ,, Pups 
2 American Raccoons, large ... ... ,, 

1 Indian Civet Cat... 
1 Dourocouli, very tame 

1 Alligator, three feet long ... 

4 English Fox Cubs ... ... ... each 

To arrive some time in August: — 

2 full grown Male Black Panthers, guaranteed perfect and 

sound. 

3 Porcupines 

1 Japanese Bear 

4 Jackals 

I might also offer Blue Foxes provided sufficient inducement offers. 



each 



60/6 
80/6 
40/6 
60/6 
40/6 
40/6 
70/6 



"Advices received from New York this Saturday morning 
10th inst of the following being shipped on S. S. •' Minnehaha." 
i Sea Lions adult, with 1 pup born on voyage. 40 Horseshoe 
Crabs. The Snakes and other reptiles follow on next steamer." 

Cable from Halifax received '• Live stock uninjured, Sea 
ions, Horseshoe Crabs arrive on the 20th July." I undertake 
ielivery now on the 22nd inst. Kindly confirm orders. 



To arrive Friday next :— Tame Russian Bear, on Collar and 
Jhain, quite tame, half-grown, good show, £12. 

Note. — The Ringtail Monkeys are " wee pets," very interest- 
ing. The Male Chimpanzee is quite tame, great pet. The 
Cormorants are most interesting birds, great divers. The Grey 
""arrots are genuine acclimatised birds. 



Large Tortoise from South America ... 
Splendid Cormorants 

,, Herons 
Egyptian Goose, with 7 Goslings for ... 
3 Barheaded Geese, gander 50/6 goose 60/6 
2 Whitefronted,, ,, 20/6 ,, 20/6 

12 Carolina Ducks drake 15/6 duck 20/6 

7 Common Wood Pigeons (6 months in stock) 
14 Jungle Fowls, cocks 10/6 hens 12/6 

6 Silver Pheasants, cocks 12/6 hens 16/6 
2 Mongolian ,, ,, 25/6 ,, 30/6 

8 Golden ,, ,, 16/6 „ 20/6 
2 Amherst ., „ 20/6 „ 25/6 
6 Swinhoe „ ,, 30/6 ,, 40/6 
1 Caracara, very handsome birds, rare 

1 European Kestrel 
Macaws, blue and buff 
Grey Parrot, quite tame, splendid talker 

(this has a few feathers off breast) 
Blue fronted Amazon, very fine 
Budgerigars, cocks 3/- hens 3/6 

10 pairs 50/- 20 pairs 90/- 
Pagoda Mynahs, very fine 
Lemon crested Cockatoo 

Peach faced Lovebird sold. 





£2 


each 


12/6 


,, 


12/6 




50/6 


pair 


£b 


,, 


40/6 


,, 


30/6 


each 


10/6 


pair 


20/6 


,, 


26/6 


,, 


50/6 


,, 


30/6 


,, 


40/6 


,, 


65/6 


only 


40/6 




5/6 


each 


60/6 




£10 




£7 




£2 


pair 


5/6 


each 


12/6 


•• 


30/6 



ROLLER CANARIES. Voogts Strain. 

All these birds have given every satisfaction. 

Roller hens, I. Class, 3/- each. These match No, I. cock. 

Ordinary hens 2 for Aj- in wicker cage. 14 in 7 cages, 20/-. 
Roller cocks, I. Class, 12/- each, usually sold at 20/-, 30/- each. 

These are finest birds obtainable, having the waterbubble, 

Woodlark and Nightingale notes, soft, low, sweet notes of 

unheard of beauty. 
Roller Cocks, II. Class, 7/6 each. 7 in 7 cages 49/ Very fine 

Rollers of exquisite song, many being worth 10/- each. 
Roller Cocks, III. Class, 6/6 each. 7 in 7 cages 42/ . Good sound 

serviceable birds, long notes, usually sold at 8/- each. 
Piping Bullfinch, two tunes, 60/- This bird has shortwings, or 

price would have been 100/- Very tame, exquisite song. 



p= 



5©C 



I 



hM zoological 



^ 



RECBIVKl> 



Hamlyns 
Menagerie 
Magazine. 



No. 4.— Vol. 1. 



AUGUST, 1915. 



Price Sixpence. 






CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTORY 

SOME NOTES ON SETTE CAMA ... 

GORILLA LAND IN SPANISH WEST AFRICA 

CHATHAM'S GREAT ELEPHANT 

SKUNK DEVELOPMENT 

THE PET WOLVES I HAVE MET ... 

WILD ANIMALS AS HOUSE PETS ... 

WAR AFFECTS THE ZOO ... 

RACCOONS AT THE SCOTTISH ZOOLOGICAL PARK ' 

PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY 

ELEPHANT STEALING 

AN INTERESTING NOTE FROM "CAGE BIRDS" ... 

GENERAL NOTES 



& 



?Qc 



4 



Hamljn's iStatajjerk JEagajine. 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 4.— Vol. 1. 



LONDON, AUGUST, 1915. 



PRICE SIXPENCE. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

List of Subscribers for July : — 

David Ezra, 3, Kyd Street, Calcutta. 

Robt. D. Carsox, Zoological Gardens, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., U.S.A. 

The Director, Royal Zoological Society, Natura 
Artis Magistra, Amsterdam. 

William Jamrach, 65, Lordship Road, Stoke 
Newington, N. 

Sir John Bland Sutton, 47, Brook Street, Gros- 
venor Square, W. 

John K. Butter, M.D., Highfield House, Can- 
nock, Staffs. 

LADY Julia FOLLETT, The Woodside, Old Wind- 
sor. 

Hakry Mitchell, Haskells, Lyndhurst, Hants. 

Dan Mason, Maisonette, Broadstairs. 

F. W. SMALLEY, F.Z.S., M.B.O.U., Challan Hall, 
Silverdale, Carnforth, Lanes. 

T. Hebb, Brooklea, Downs Road, Luton. 

Mrs. E. Jordan, Connaught Mansions, Battersea. 

J. Steel, M.I)., Castlerock, Co. Londonderry, 
Ireland. 

Messrs. Jennison & Co., Belle Vue, Manchester. 

("Good luck to your effort." — G. JENNISON.) 
W. Ki.\<., 22, High Street, Whit. chapel. 
ZOSHITARO Klrokaua, Zoological Gardens, 

L'yeno Park, Tokyo, Japan. 

Tin: Royal Zoological Society, Phoenix Park, 
Dublin. 

A. S. Yates, Bishops Sutton, Alresford, Hants. 

W. J. Henning, Hillside, New Maiden. 

THE COUNTESS OF JERSEY, Middle-ton Park, Bices- 
ter. 

Major AiuiRi.i.v, Croit Castle, Kingsland, Here- 
fordshire, 

Sir Edgar Boehm, Bentsbrooke, North Holm- 
wood, Surrey. 



Lastly, but not least, Mr. Gerald Rattigax writes 
from Stonehouse, Gloucester : — 

"Dear Sir, 

Many thanks for the copies of the " Men- 
agerie Magazine" you kindly sent me. I 
did not really intend to subscribe to anything 
fresh this year or until after the war, but I find 
your Magazine interesting enough" to make me 
break my vow, and you may put me down as a 
Subscriber to it for this year. 

Your "Push and Go" certainly deserve the 
success which I expect is sure to attend your 
new venture. 

I enclose cheque for 6/-, and kindly forward 
me the first number which I have not at present 
received." 



The following Articles will appear from time to 
time as opportunity occurs : — 

"How I became a Naturalist." 

"Why I went to the Congo." 

"My Second Visit to the Congo." 

"Gorilla Dealing — Alive and Dead." 

"A true acount of the origination of the Wild 
Beast Business in Great Britain." 

"The Peculiarities of this Unique Business." 

"My Visit to South Africa." 

"The Advent of the Boxing Kangaroo and the 
Wrestling Lion. " 

"Concerning 'Peter,' one of the most famous 
Chimpanzees of the Age; also on the train- 
ing of Chimpanzees in general." 

"The Arrival and Landing of the Barnum and 
Bailey Show, 1899." 

" My Expedition to Dyers Islands, Cape of Good 
Hope, resulting in the capture of 125 Pen- 
guins and 12 Cape Sea Lions." 

"Ivory Buying in the French Congo." 

" How I attempted to corner the Monkey Mar- 
ket thirty years ago, and lamentably failed." 

"An impression of the Zoological Gardens at 
Regents Park, Dublin, Bristol, Edinburgh, 
Halifax and Manchester." 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



SOME NOTES ON SETTE CAMA. 

On account of pressure of space, the remain- 
der of this Article, with a description of the Water 
Elephant by the Fernan Faz native will be given 
in the September number of this Magazine,. 



GORILLA LAND IN SPANISH 
WEST AFRICA. 

By Sir Harry Johnston, G.C.M.G., K.C.B. 

Mr. Hamlyn has asked me to send him a 
short account of the "mysterious" river in Spanish 
West Africa. I think he is alluding to the River 
Muni which enters the sea a little to the north of 
Corisco JBay, and is in fact, the river of Spanish 
Guinea. 

Some years ago Mr. Hamlyn and I met on 
board a steamer going out to West Africa, and 
discussed the regions in Africa most likely to yield 
remarkable discoveries in the way of birds and 
mammals. Mr. Hamlyn or his agent subsequently 
made such discoveries. I had advised him to try 
Spanish Guinea, a region with which I became 
slightly acquainted on two former occasions on 
visiting West Africa. But the region is now 
scarcely to be called mysterious. It has been a 
good deal explored by Germans during the last 
five years, notably by Gunter Tessmann. 

Its chief interest to naturalists lies in its being 
a portion of Gorilla Land. Although not a large 
area, yet like Liberia very much farther to the 
west, it is one of those regions of forested Africa 
which are likely to< have a somewhat specialised 
fauna. It is in any case of remarkable interest to 
those who delight in remarkable beasts, birds, 
and reptiles. For the most part its fauna is akin 
to that of the Cameroons, yet I believe it has some 
things which are not found SO' far north as the 
Cameroons but are characteristic of the Gaboon 
and of Western Equatorial Congoland. But as a 
region in which gorillas are found quite close to 
the sea coast it attracts attention most notably; 
inasmuch as the explorer would not have to travel 
very far from his base to get into touch with the 
home life of the gorilla. It is thisi that we want 
most of all to' explore : what the Gorilla is like 
when he is at home, whether he builds anything 
in the shape of a house or shelter, whether he lives 
in pairs or in little troops, whether he is noisy or 
silent, what food he eats, and how he obtains it. 

Much farther to the cast Cirenfell, the mis- 
sionary explorer, was told by the natives that 
gorillas sometimes associated in small bands and 
hunted the leopard till it was worn out with 



fatigue and fell a prey to their hands and teeth. 
They were then said to bury the body until decom- 
position set in, when its flesh was easier, to masti- 
cate. It is only Grenfell, by-the-by, who has 
regarded the existence of the Gorilla to- the north 
of the main Congo in the forest region between 
the Congo and the Mubangi. Except for his 
records there is no news of any gorilla being 
found between the regions of West-central Africa 
(Gaboon, Muni River, and Cameroons) and East- 
central Africa — the regions to' the north-west and 
north of Lake Tanganyika. From this district 
comes the most interesting form of gorilla — Gorilla 
beringeri, which is slightly more like humanity 
than the gorilla of West Africa — as anyone may 
see by inspecting the large male specimen now 
set up in the British Museum of Natural History. 
But here ag'ain we know next to nothing of the 
gorilla's life when he is at home. 

I am sure Mr. Hamlyn is of my opinion that 
collectors of natural history are out nowadays not 
only to collect specimens but information as to 
the life habits of interesting wild creatures, and 
I am sure that he will direct his efforts personally 
as much as possible to this end. 

[On 17th July, I wrote to Sir Harry Johnston 
asking for a short article on the mysterious 
river in Spanish West Africa. 

At the time I met Sir Harry Johnston he ex- 
plained that it had never been explored as 
regards the birds and mammals. He strongly 
advised me to make a collecting trip in that 
region. There were some extraordinary spiders, 
reptiles and monkeys there, also a rare speci- 
men of the gorilla. At that time I was bound 
for the French Congo and unfortunately since 
then no opportunity has occurred to allow me 
to visit that wild region. I certainly spent a day 
at the mouth of that river on a clearing known 
as Coco Beach, and found a rare Chevoritan 
which I landed alive. Whilst thanking Sir 
Harry Johnston for his very interesting article, 
I sincerely trust to receive later on another and 
longer account of this primitive region. — John 
D. Hamlyn.] 



CHATHAM'S GREAT ELEPHANT. 



Digging up a Monster Fossil. 

An almost entire fossil elephant of enormous 
size is now being excavated in the grounds of the 
Royal School of Military Engineering at Upnor, 
near Chatham. It was discovered during some 
trenching work in gravel some time before, the 
war begfan. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



The elephant belongs to a species known as 
Elephas antiquus, of the early Pleistocene epoch, 
and is much larger than the Mammoth. In geo- 
logical age the Elephas antiquus occurs earlier 
than the Mammoth, and although perhaps at one 
time contemporary, it died out sooner, and is 
thought by some to have been a direct ancestor of 
the Mammoth. 

It is believed to have been a more southern 
form, and enjoyed a milder climate than the Mam- 
moth, which was covered with shaggy red hair, as 
we know from several entire bodies which have 
been found in the frozen gravels of Northern 
Siberia. 

The present specimen is being carefully dis- 
interred by Dr. C. W. Andrews, F.R.S., one of 
the officers of the Geological Department of the 
British Museum, the scientist who discovered in 
Egypt a series of early elephantine skeletons link- 
ing up the modern elephants with lilliputian forms 
which had been found in Fayoum, Egypt — an im- 
portant work in the history of the evolutionary 
theory. 

Reconstructed Monster. 

It is thought that the Upnor specimen may be 
restored and mounted whole in the Natural His- 
tory Museum, and that it will measure in height 
at the shoulder about fourteen feet. As the bones 
are recovered they have to be covered with plaster 
of Paris and dried carefully to prevent shrinkage 
and distortion. They will have to' be finally har- 
dened with a solution of glue or shellac and alco- 
hol. This process is being carried out by one of 
the museum's "preparators," Mr. L. E. Parsons, 
who will, on returning to the museum, have to 
spend many months of work before the restoration 
is complete. 

The more fragile portions of the skull are un- 
fortunately much shattered, but they can probably 
be restored by comparison with other skulls. This 
will be the first complete Elephas antiquus pre- 
served in England. Portions have often been 
discovered, but complete specimens are extremely 
rare. This one must have been entombed in the 
gravel before the ligatures which held the bones 
together had perished. 

The remains were discovered in some old river 
terrace gravel, and it is quite possible that flint 
implements of contemporary man may also be 
discovered in or near the excavations. 

Portions of this particular species of elephant 
were also found in the bed at Mauer, which yielded 
one of thei earliest remains of man \ct discovered — 
a lower jawbone of enormous size and thickness 
known as that of the "Heidelberg man." 

The remains of the elephants discovered at 
Piltdown were, however, of earlier date, and the 
human jaw discovered with the Piltdown skull is 
Of a more primitive form than the Mauer jaw*. 



SKUNK DEVELOPMENT. 

[For the commencement of this circular which 
emanates from an American Bureau, see No. 3, 
page 3, Vol. I., of this Magazine. — Editor.] 



Conclusion. 
How can I learn to remove the scent sacs? This 
Bureau has prepared special instruments by which 
anyone can learn to remove the scent sacs. Even 
a boy can learn easily. A book of full directions 
is sent with each set of instruments and contains 
diagrams showing just how to reach the scent sacs 
and how to remove them without spilling any scent 
fluid. The book. tells-ho-w. to handle- and hold the 
skunk while removing the scent sacs so no scent 
can be thrown or escape. 

What does the set of instruments consist of? 
The set of instruments consists of one Nickel- 
Plated Dissecting Knife, one pair Nickel-Plated 
Special Extracting Forceps, one pair Nickel- 
Plated Automatic Clamping Forceps (to prevent 
escape of scent), one Nickel-Plated Hook, one 
Nickel-Plated Probe and two pairs of Goggles 
which are worn by beginners to protect the eyes 
in case of any possible accident while learning. 

Can I make any money by removing the scent 
sacs from Skunks? Yes, you should be able to 
sell the first skunk you operate on, even if striped, 
for at least $5 to someone who would like it as a 
pet or as a curiosity. A tame skunk will draw big 
crowds when placed in a store window for adver- 
tising purposes. Amusement Parks are glad to 
get them. It will thus be seen that the cost of 
instruments can at once be more than recovered 
and money can be made by selling tame skunks or 
by operating for other people. 

How can a Skunk be tamed? The skunk is 
naturally gentle and not much afraid of people. 
When the scent sacs have been removed from a 
young skunk it will be found at once quite tame 
and may be carried about in your arms like a 
kitten. If it is handled frequently it will grow up 
very tame, will come when called and will cat 
from the hand. 

Are the scent sacs the same in both sexes? 
Yes, they are the same in both sexes. They open 
into the rectum and are not related in any waj t<> 
the reproductive or urinary systems. The scenl 
fluid is not the urine as many people imagine, but 
is a special fluid which constitutes the skunk's 
only defense. 

What dors the Skunk Development Bureau pay 
for Black Skunks? This Bureau pays from $15 
to $30 each lor grade AAA (see chart), according 

to time ol year, locality and size. The scent sacs 

must be removed. The Bureau pays express 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



charges on all skunks which it buys. If you have 
anv choice specimens you wish to see write us full 
description of blackest you have and we will gladly 
make you quotation. We take AAA even if foot 
or leg gone. 

How can live Skunks be shipped? If the scent 
sacs have been removed you can ship a skunk by 
express in a box with wire netting over the open- 
ing. If the distance is great, supply plenty of dog 
biscuit or dry bread and a dish for water. Mark 
on box, "Please give water." If the weather is 
cold make a nest of straw in one end of box. 

What is the best age for removing the scent 
sacs ? This work can be done at any age easily 
unless the skunk is very fat. We strongly recom- 
mend that you begin on young skunks in the 
Spring, any time after the eyes are open. The 
young skunks are easily weaned. They readily 
take milk or bread and milk and do not need the 
mother. 

What kind of fencing do I need for Skunks? 
Poultry netting 2 to 3 feet in the ground and 4 to 
5 feet above ground makes the cheapest fence. 
To prevent climbing out make at the top an over- 
hang of netting 5 2 or I s inches wide or place a 
strip of tin about 18 inches wide on the inside of 
the fence near the top to make it smooth and 
slippery. The netting should be 1^-inch mesh for 
the main yard (for adults) and 1-inch mesh for 
the breeding pens. We can supply netting. 



THE PET WOLVES I HAVE MET. 

By Pierre Amedee Pic hot. 

Under the heading, "The Wild Animals as 
House Pets," Mr. H. .S. Spencer has contributed 
to the " Menagerie Magazine" an interesting arti- 
cle on wolves, but the writer has rather dealt with 
the historical records of these deizens of the forest 
than with their behaviour under the management 
of man. Though I doubt that the Little Red Riding 
Hood should ever have thought of making a pet 
of the wolf which she discovered under her grand- 
mother's bed clothes, yet many persons have 
proved more enterprising and have, at times, in- 
troduced the wolf to the intimacy of their family 
circle. During the dark ages, when the monks 
and hermits sought the recesses of the extensive 
forest lands which at that time covered the greater 
part of Gaul,, those pious folks have had frequent 
intercourse with the wild beasts, and numerous 
accounts have been preserved of their success in 
taming them. I dare say many of these state- 
ments have been magnified by popular folk-lore, 
yet there must have been a certain amount of truth 



in the records of the memorialists.. One of the 
most ancient writers on monastical life, Sulfricius 
Severus, who at the end of the fourth Century had 
visited Egypt to study the establishments of the 
religious orders, has reported several instances 
of the dealings of the Holy Fathers with the wild 
animals of the desert, and says that he saw a 
monk feeding peacefully a lion with dates from 
the palm trees, while at the door of a hut occupied 
by another hermit, a she-wolf came every day to 
be fed with the scraps from the recluse's frugal 
repast and licked the hand, of its kind host in 
return. Herve, the blind patron of the Brittany 
Cards, was led about by a wolf which he had 
compelled to supply the place of his dog which 
this animal had devoured, and a wolf having killed 
Saint Malo's donkey had been mad to carry the 
panniers in which the .Saint collected dry wood 
from the forest. Thegonnec, another Armorican 
Abbot, is also credited with having engaged a 
wolf to draw the cart loaded with the materials 
lor building his church. 

But it is with tame wolves in modern times 
that I am concerned, and I may state that I have 
seen the Russian artist, Troubetskoy, turn up with 
two wolves in a leash at one of our dog shows. 
One of the best animal painters of our days, Ed. 
Merite, has kept these last four years a wolf which 
he has reared by hand after having taken it from 
the lair when about ten days old. For over six 
months he was on very familiar terms with his 
pupil, entering in its den without any apprehen- 
sion, and often accompanied by his pointer; but 
one day the wolf without any forewarning, flew 
at the throat of the^dog which Merite had great 
trouble to rescue from the powerful grip, and ever 
since he has refrained from coming to close quar- 
ters with the willy brute. However, this wolf 
knows well its master, rejoices at seeing him on 
his return home, licks his hands, and would lain 
fawn upon him if the artist did not take good 
care to keep the bars of the railing between him- 
self and his pensioner. 

At Gencay, in the Department of the Yienne, 
a master of hounds, M. Lamoudie, has long kept 
a couple of she-wolves in his kennels alongside 
with his hounds, and they were often mustered in 
the open with the pack. Then the most remark- 
able tame wolves 1 ever saw were those belong- 
ing to the renowned louvetier of the Andelvs, in 
Normandy, the Count Le Couteulx de Canteleu. 
There were three of them which had been taken 
quite young and thoroughly domesticated; they 
lived with the hounds and were as much under con- 
trol as the rest of the pack, even when taken out 
for a walk. Yet, strange to say, they were often 
used for entering young hounds to the rather 
fickle quarry that wolves are, and which many 
hounds do not take to freely. On such occasions, 
they were let loose in the adjoining park of M. 
Saint-Evron entirely enclosed by stone walls, and 



HAMLYN5S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



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Telegrams : " Hamlyn, London Docks, London." 



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application. 



The Editor will be glad to receive for publication articles 
and all interesting photos, the imports and exports of all 
stock, and foreign adventures with all wild stock. The 
subscription is 6/- per ann., or 6d. per copy, post free, 
which will be sent under cover. The success of the 
Magazine depends entirely on the support given by the 
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then the hounds were put on the scent, and after 
a glorious chase, hounds and wolves returned 
together to the kennels en very good terms with 
each other. 

Count Le Couteulx 's wolves were most 
friendly with their master for whom they showed 
the greatest affection, though they had a vicious 




Count Le Couteulx dc Canteleu's huntsman Trotty 
and his Wolf " Lymer." 

knack for snapping at one when taken by sur- 
prise, but they had been cured of that tendency 
by the Count seizing the culprit by (he. scruff of 
the neck and rubbing it's gufs with his knotty 
riding stick so far as to draw blood. One day, 
as he was kneeling over a wolf and inflicting thai 
kind of punishment, one of the brutes nol recog- 
nising it's master from behind, came to the rescue 



and seized the Count by the fat part of his hind 
quarters. Without releasing the animal he was 
dealing with, the Count simply turned nis head 
and called out to the offender by it's name, 
"Jane!" whereupon "Jane" let go and, ashamed 
of herself, skulked in a dark corner of the kennel. 

With a view of putting- to the test the scent- 
ing capabilities of wolves, Count Le Couteulx had 
trained two of his pets to act as lymcrs for un- 
harbouring wild quarry in the forest of Lyons, and 
very good work has done the Count's huntsman, 
Trotty, with his wolf-lymer in unravelling the 
tracks of the boars which were the usual animals 
of the chase of the St. Martin's pack when wolves' 
had got scarce. 

Alas, poor Yorick ! The louvetier des Ande- 
lys, his wolves and hounds, and many of the boon 
companions of my youth, have departed for more 
happy hunting fields, should say the Red Indian, 
but I still have the howl of those pet wolves ring- 
ing in my ears as when on a quiet evening, sipping 
our coffee on the terrace of the chateau, after a 
hard day's ride, the wolves from their far off 
kennels responded to the whistle of their master 
whom they instantly recognised. 



WILD ANIMALS AS HOUSE PETS. 

By Robert Leadbetter. 



"JOHNNIE." 

"Johnnie" was the tamest lion I ever owned, 
the best-behaved lion I ever owned. 

For some years I was very successful breed- 
ing lions, and had two or three' cubs in the house 
at different times, but only one who stayed on to 
become a lion— "Johnnie." With all wild animals 
nearly, I have found, alluding always to those 
who have not had their tempers previously soured, 
by rough usage, when they once know you will 
not hurt "them," they will not try to hurt' "you," 
unless, in some ungovernable fit of fury, from some 
exceptional cause, and even then, as' a rule, they 
will not forget past kindnesses. Hut woe be to he, 
Who has systematically bullied them then! 
Though where ordinary intelligence is displayed 

in their management, These out-bursts arc, not lo 
be feared, without cause. Naturally there are 
exceptions; 1 am speaking in general' terms, hut 
my experience with them lias taught me most 
animals remember kindness — and many long 
cherish the reverse. 



Seme people would have us believe animals 
empers are soured by confinement. Where the\ 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



are well fed, well housed, generally well looked 
after, where their lives are made happy, such is 
certainly not the case. 

Animals' dispositions, be it remembered, vary 
as much as our own, and knowing the "individual" 
animal's character, minimises considerably any 
risk one may run, from their wild pet, whether 
large or small. 

But to real animal lovers, this is not great ! 
Animals are good judges. 

There are men and women whom they in- 
stinctively trust; there are others from whom they 
would flee ! The man who controls wild animals', 
or indeed any animals, by "their fear of him," is 
not the successful man, but the man who controls 
them, where he and they are "friends," where 
the animal has learnt he will always be fairly 
treated vet is fullv aware he must not do this or 
that— is^ 

Animals have a great idea of fairness. 

For anyone thoroughly conversant with ani- 
mals and their ways, it is easy to form an opinion 
as to the conditions existing between a keeper and 
his charges, with a little observation, and no 
amount of talking can alter what is quite apparent, 
should it not be to the credit of the attendant. 

Animals love being talked to> 

The silent man, be he ever so thorough in his 
work, is not the man to be with them; he never 
gains their confidence as he who talks to them 
will do, or are the animals as happy in his charge. 

The same, of course, 
animals. 



applies to domestic 



"Johnnie" came to live in the house when he 
was ten weeks old; he was delicate, and the other 
members of his family pushed him away from the 
milk bowl. 

"That one is a Johnnie !" my lion keeper said 
one evening, nodding to a male cub. "As fast as 
I gets him to the bowl he lets them others push 
him away." So he was "Johnnie" ! and a few 
days after his christening I took him out of the 
dens and brought him in to live in my study, where 
there were no rollicking brothers and sisters to 
come and push him away, and where he could sit 
by his milk bowl and lap in peace. 

Thinking it was best he should have a com- 
panion, I fetched a tortoiseshell kitten from the 
Home Farm for him. 

There were — as usual — kittens in the house 
at the time, but I wanted a stranger to the geo- 
graphy indoors, knowing it would be more prob- 
able to> make a home in my study, than one from 
the kitchen who would wish to return to its 
family circle there, opportunity permitting. 



"The Tortoiseshell Lady" — for it was a lady 
— and "Johnnie" were soon huge chums, and lay 
by the fire nearly all day, and slept cuddled up 
together in a basket at night, sharing the milk 
pan and meat plate. 

In the meantime, "Johnnie's" sojourn in the 
house was working wonders ! and after a few 
weeks visit he was no "Johnnie!" in my lion 
keeper's parlance. 

Sitting with a paw either side of his meat 
pan, he would growl, looking this way and that, 
twisting his tail — daring the world to come near, 
now ! 

At first, "The Tortoiseshell Lady" was scared 
to death at the new turn of affairs, and scuttled 
to hide under a cheffoneer, but in a day or two she 
discovered, while he was busy with his growlings, 
she could come and eat. 

(To be continued). 



WAR AFFECTS THE ZOO. 

War has had an effect on the Zoo. The num- 
ber of visitors from January 1 to> July 31 showed 
a decrease of 125,605 on the figures of the previous 
year, and the receipts at the gates showed a 
decrease of £4,580. 



RACCOONS AT THE SCOTTISH 
ZOOLOGICAL PARK. 

A new enclosure for the North American rac- 
coons and their kindred has just been completed 
at the Scottish Zoological Park, and in it the ideal 
of providing an entirely natural surrounding for 
the animals in the Park has been almost perfectly 
realised. In this respect the raccoon is a some- 
what simple little fellow to cater for. He does 
not burrow to any extent, and possesses small 
power of leaping, and though he is partly a tree 
dweller his climbing powers are not sufficient 
to enable him to make much headway en a smooth 
surface. In forming the enclosure a site was 
chosen in which there was a small grassy know 
and a growing tree of some size, and all that was 
necessary was to surround this space with a wall 
from three to four feet high. The raccoon appre- 
ciates a shallow pool, and so the water from the 
otter pool above was led into the raccoon enclo- 
sure, where it forms a pool of some few square 
yards in extent, and a little stream bordering one 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



side of the enclosure. A gravel beach has been 
provided at one side of the pool, and the banks 
of the streamlet have been finished off with boul- 
ders and clumps of rushes, and the work looks 
exactly like a section out of a hill burn. Three 
raccoons have now been placed in the enclosure, 
and may be seen there either sitting- on a branch 
of the tree, wandering amongst the grass, or 
sometimes squatting by the side of the pool en- 
gaged in washing their food. This last operation 
is an interesting characteristic of the. raccoon, who 
invariably washes the flesh on which he feeds 
before he eats it, alternately dipping it into the 
water and rubbing it between his two front paws. 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL 
ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY. 

The Council met at Dublin on August 14th, 
Dr. R. F. Scharff, Vice-President, in the chair. 
Also present — Hon. Sec. (Prof. Scott, acting), 
Hon. Treasurer (Dr. MacDowel Cosgrave, the 
Hon. Mr. Justice Boyd, M. F. Headlam, Esq., 
James Inglis, Esq., T. K. Laidlaw, Esq. 

The following new arrivals for the collection 
were noted — Quaker parrakeets and turtle doves, 
wood pigeons, from W. W. Despard, Esq. ; Italian 
black snake and ringed snake, peacock and pea 
hen, Lady Palmer; fan-tail pigeons and a blue- 
fronted amazon. The visitors for the week 
numbered 2,785. The Rev. F. Avent, St. Cath- 
erine's, N.C.R., was entered as a Garden sub- 
scriber. A large party of children were enter- 
tained to tea and to the other enjoyments afforded 
by an afternoon at the Gardens by Mr. H. Figgis 
during the week. Unfortunately the weather was 
extremely showery, which to some extent marred 
the youngsters' enjoyment, nevertheless they con- 
tented themselves with the indoor delights, the 
gorillas ("Mr. George" and "Susan") causing 
much fun. Another large party from the Drum- 
mond School also had their annual outing as usual 
at the Gardens. The coming week, from 21st 
inst. to 28th included, which this year is to replace 
Horse Show Week, as it has been known by in 
former years, is to be a week in which recreation 
will be provided for visitors from the country, and 
the numerous societies started since the outbreak 
of the war are in some instances organising attrac- 
tions both for the sake of the city and to benefit 
thf various relief funds they represent. The Gar- 
dens will be much frequented by the country visi- 
tors, and it has been arranged to give a whole- 
week at half-price — that is 6d. per head for 
adults, and children, as always, half-price, or 3d. 
Willi fine weather, this should provide an added 

inducement to intending excursionists. This is 
First time there has been a 6dL week at the Car- 



dens. Should it prove a success, no doubt the 
Council will try it on another occasion. The Eland 
cow presented by his Grace the Duke of Bedford 
is expected shortly, and will, it is hoped, arrive 
in time to be on exhibition for the "Visitors' 
Week" in Dublin. 



ELEPHANT STEALING. 



" NOTHING EASIER " : 
DECREASE OF THE CRIME IN SIAM. 



Mention of elephant stealing in a Consular 
report usually occasions comment of a humorous 
nature, it being apparently thought that the crime 
is a difficult one to commit. This is a mistake 
(declares the British Consul in Siam). Nothing is 
easier than to' steal an elephant, and there is no 
crime the prevalence of which has a more preju- 
dicial effect on trade in Northern Siam. It is there- 
fore gratifying to observe that the official figures 
for the year April, 1913, to March, 1913', show 
that fewer elephants were stolen than during any 
previous year concerning which statistics have 
been published. 

Since the introduction of branding paste, the 
marks from which are almost ineradicable, the 
number of elephants stolen has steadily dimin- 
ished, and if this paste can be brought into general 
use the crime may in time entirely cease. 



AN INTERESTING NOTE FROM 
"CAGE BIRDS." 

An interesting event has just occurred at the 
Scottish Zoo. The pair of Rheas have hatched out 
a nest of promising chicks. As mentioned in my 
article, "A Daj with t he Birds at the Scottish 
Zoo," of January last, the peculiarity of the 
Rhea's family affairs is that the hen merely lays 
the eggs (a hole, scooped in the sand being all the 
nest she troubles to makej and leaves the incuba- 
tion and feeding to the "mere male," while she 
remains a perfectly disinterested looker-on. Our 
partieular Rhea, however, has found an unex- 
pected helper in his arduous duties in the person 
of a hen Emu (kept in the same enclosure) which 
has formed an attachment lor him and his chicks. 
She tends the latter as ii they were her own. It 
is indeed a most interesting sight, and has 
attracted a lot of visitors. The Zoo officials seem 
to have an opportunity of producing Rhea-Emu 
hybrids next year. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

That we regret to find that we were grossly mis- 
informed about the price stated in our last issue 
to have been paid for the Pallas's Cat imported 
on the s.s. "Crosby Hall," also that the value 
mentioned was incorrect. 

That the following notice of "The Bazaar, Ex- 
change and Mart" has received our particular 
attention : — 

Hamlyn's "Menagerie Magazine." — We 
have received from the well-known naturalist 
dealer, Mr. J. D. Hamlyn, 221, St. George's 
Street, E., the third number of the above 
magazine. It seems to improve with each is- 
sue, and there is no good reason why its 
scope should not be still further widened. A 
few good illustrations of some of the very in- 
teresting animals that come into Mr. Ham- 
lyn's possession, together with practical notes 
thereon, would help in the direction referred 
to. In our opinion, Mrs. Hamlyn's contribu- 
tion on her pet Chimpanzee Peter in the cur- 
rent issue is certainly interesting. It is a pity, 
however, that the illustrations accompanying 
it are so small and so indistinctly printed, as 
they are worthy of a better fate. 

That the following articles are unfortunately 
crowded out in this number :—" Jack the Mon- 
kev Man," "Jumbo" (this, has been sent by a 
youthful contributor, Laurance Pullar), Reports 
of the Irish ant Scotch Societies, with other 
most interesting matter. 

That Monsieur Pierre Amedee Pichot, of Paris, 
Sir Harry Johnston, with Mr. Leadbetter, have 
our best thanks for their interesting articles. 

That Mr. Harper has returned from India with 
a mixed choice collection of rare birds, also an 
orang outang, the whole of which have been al- 
ready disposed of in Great Britain : — green fruit 
pigeons, lanceolated jay, golden oriole, see see 
partridge, giant barbet, purple sun birds, 2 
species Himalayan tits, red Himalayan sun bird, 
pied bush chat, yellow throated sparrows, finch 
larks, coral billed bulbul, streaked laughing 
thrush, 1 jora, rosy miniuet, small brown babb- 
ler, 1 shrike — the last four mentioned are new 
to the Zoological Society's collection — 1 half- 
grown female orang outang. The collection 
arrived in superb condition, and reflects credit 
on the collector. 

That two giant tortoises arrived on the s.s. "Min- 
nehaha" from the Sandwich Islands via New- 
York. Mr. Pocock, of our Zoological Society, 
contributes to "The Field" the following most 
interesting particulars : — 



The Society is indebted to Lord Rothschild 
for two giant tortoises, natives of the Gala- 
pagos Islands, which were recently procured 
for him by Mr. Thomas Gerrard in the Sand- 
wich Islands. One of them is an example of 
Testudo galapagocnsis, which formerly ex- 
isted in Charles Island; the other os T. nigrita 
from Indefatigable Island, in the Galapagos. 

Both of them came from Kauai, in the 
Sandwich or Hawaian Archipelago, where the 
specimen of T. nigrita is known to have been 
for seventy-five years.; beyond that its history 
is unknown. The example of T. galapagoen- 
sis, however, has been in the possession of 
the Royal family of the Hawaian Islands, for 
about a century, and was until recently the 
property of the ex-Queen Liliuokalani. It is 
one of the very large number of giant tor- 
toises turned loose in the Pacific Islands, par- 
ticularly in Rotumah, by Capt. David Porter, 
of the U.S. battleship Essex, who was set to 
guard the Galapagos Islands in 1813-14. For 
these particulars I am indebted to Lord Roths- 
child, who further informs me that only six 
samples of T. galapagoensis are known, the 
one now exhibited by the Society being, it is 
believed, the last living specimen of the 
species. It is one of the so-called "saddle- 
backed" forms and is a male, measuring 44in. 
along the middle line of the carapace. 

The specimen of T. nigrita, a female, was 
presented to Lord Rothschild by Messrs. G. 
N. and A. S. Wilcox, of Lihue, Kauai. 

That the arrivals in Liverpool have been toucans, 
amazons, grey parrots, with a few monkeys. 

That the arrivals in Southampton practically nil. 

That the arrivals in London have been 1 tame pet 
Indian bear, 2 chimpanzees, 98 mixed Senegal 
birds, 5 small mangabeys, 3 rhesus, 1 Cuban 
parrot, 4 grey parrots, 20 American skunks, 30 
mixed American snakes, 10 grey frogs, 10' terra- 
pins, 1 horse shoe crab, 3 macaws, with other 
odds and ends. 

That Mr. R. Colton deserves special mention for 
his few choice specimens ex s.s. "Osterley" from 
Sydney : 1 king parrot, 1 crimson wing, 1 Stan- 
ley, 1 red martel, 1 blue bonnet, with a lew 
barrabands. 

That our attention has been drawn to the Article 
on English Dealers in the Avicultural Magazine 
which shall receive our attention in the Septem- 
ber number. Personally, we do not consider 
the writer to be of such sufficient standing to 
take to task, but, by the special request of many 
of our readers, it shall be done. 

That the Year Book, 1915, of The Amateur Men- 
agerie Club has arrived. It contains a vast 
amount of most interesting matter. 



Printed by W. ]. Hasted & Son, (T.U.), 306, Mile End Road, London, E. 



Telegrams : v Hamlyn, London Docks, London. 



Telephone : 6341 Avenue. 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East. 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station. 
Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence five minutes walk. 

P.O.O. payabh at Leman Street, East. Cheques crossed " London County &> Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TERMS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from time of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back. TELEPHONE. — Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS. — Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIVERY. — Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

The arrivals from abroad during the past month have been very small. Particulars are given in " General Notes." 
The usual senders are averse to undertake forwarding consignments during the period of the War. One consignment from 
Senegal, however, gave satisfaction to many customers. The 100 Senegal Finches comprised Black-backed Weavers, Napoleon 
Weavers, Red-headed Weavers, Whydahs, Cordons, Fireflnches, Bronze Mannakins, etc., and found a ready sale to one 
customer. The Oran Outang, with other animals mentioned below, are under offer to a dealer in the United States : — 

1 extra large male Chimpanzee. 

1 ,, female Chimpanzee. 

1 ,, female Oran Outang, 

1 „ Lapunda Ape. 

These are, however, all on hand at time of going to press. 



2 extra large Rhesus Monkeys. 

3 small Pet Sooty Mangabeys. 

1 ,, ' White-whiskered Manganbey. 

1 ,, Himalayan Bear. 



INDIAN PURPLE SUN BIRDS.— First arrival for two years. Purple Cocks, 60/- each ; Hens, 60/- each ; all in fine condition. 



Chameleons, direct from Morocco 

American Snakes, harmless, 6 varieties 
,, Green Frogs, extra size 

,, Terrapins and Box Tortoise ... 
,, Fence Lizards 

South American Tortoise 

,. ,, Alligator, 3£ feet 

Gila Monsters from Arizona, rare 
(Heloderma suspectum.) 

Small Monkeys, constantly arriving 

Australian Dingoes, dog, bitch and pup... 

2 American Raccoons, very fine 

1 Indian White-tailed Civet Cat 

2 Foxes, adult. 1 Cub 

1 Camel, good worker, quiet, sound 

2 Kangaroos ... 

1 Russian Bear, perfectly tame, on Collar 
1 Putty-nosed Monkey, rare ... 



each 


7/6 


each from 15/- to 25/- 


each 


5/6 


,, 


5/6 


,, 


5/6 


one 


26/6 


it 


70/6 


each 


40/6 


each from 


40/- 


... lot for 


80/- 


each 


60/- 


for 


40/- 


... lot for 


100/- 


for 


£26 


each 


£8 


ind Chain 


£12 




£4 



Wanted to Purchase 500 Guinea Pigs in lots of dozen upward, 
carriage paid here. 



1 Australian hen King Parrot ... 

4 pairs Bloodrumps ... 

3 ,, Cockatiels 

1 cock African Red-faced Lovebird 

Cereopsis Geese 



£4 

pair 45/6 

,, 20/6 

15/6 

each 80/- 



Cormorants, feed from hand 
Herons, fine condition... 

3 Muscovy Ducks 
8 Chinese Geese 

1 Victorian Crowned Pigeon, very fine... 
6 Carolina Ducks drake 15/6 duck 20/6 

4 Common Wood Pigeons (6 months in stock) 
6 Jungle Fowls cocks 10/6 hens 12/6 
4 Silver Pheasants ,, 12/6 ,, 16/6 
6 Golden ,, ,, 16/6 ,, 20/6 

2 Amherst ,, ,, 20/6 „ 25/6 
6 Swinhoe ,, ,, 30/6 ,, 40/6 
1 Caracara, very handsome birds, rare 
1 European Kestrel 
Macaw, blue and jbuff, talking ... 
Grey Parrot, quite tame, splendid talker 

,, ordinary 

1 Half-Moon Parrakeet, tame ... 
1 Orange-flanked Parrakeet, tame 
1 White-fronted Amazon, very fine 
1 Green-billed Toucan, very fine 

1 Lemon-crested Cockatoo 

2 Grenadier Weavers... 
4 Himalayan Tits, seldom imported 
1 Golden Oriole, hen ... 
1 Zebra Finch, cock ... 
6 American Indigoe Finches ... 



... • each 


12/6 


ii 


12/6 


... lot for 


15/6 


each 


12/6 




£4 


pair 


30/6 


each 


10/6 


pair 


20/6 




25/6 


„ 


30/6 




40/6 


,, 


65/6 


only 


40/6 


■ t 


5/6 


each 


80/6 




£10 




£7 


,, 


£3 




15/6 




40/6 




30/6 




40/6 




25/6 


each 


10/6 


,, 


25/6 




25/6 




5/6 




12/6 



ARRIVAL OF AMERICAN SKUNKS. 
Twenty of these interesting creatures arrrived direct from New York in first-class condition. The lowest price is £4 each. 
The first arrival of Skunks for three years. They make great pets and are quite harmless. For further information see article on 
"Skunk Development." 



ROLLER HEN CANARIES.— Two beautiful birds, in wicker cage, 3/-; 14, in 7 cages, 18/ 



p< 



2^^C 



^ 



E 



Hamlyns 






r . . :. - 



Menagerie 
Magazine 






No. 5.— Vol. 1. 



SEPTEMBER, 1915. 



Price Sixpence. 



CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTORY 

PROTECTION OF AUSTRALIAN BIRDS 

TIGER v. MAN 

THE STATUS OF THE WOLVES IN FRANCE 

THE FAUNA OF OLD BRITAIN 

WILD ANIMALS AS HOUSE PETS ... 

Mr. G. O. STARR DEAD 

ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND 

BIRTH OF A CHIMPANZEE IN CAPTIVITY 

GENERAL NOTES 



6* 



4 



Hamlgtts JEmagerie JEajja^to. 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 5.— Vol. 



LONDON, SEPTEMBER, 1915. 



PRICE SIXPENCE. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

List of Subscribers for August : — 
E. H. Bostock, Exhibition Buildings, Glasgow. 
Walter Chamberlain, Pendoek Grove, Cobham. 
Mrs. Cotton, The Mount, Bishopstoke. 
Alderman J. D. Kiley, J. P., 33, Gun Street, 

Spitalfields. 
Robert Leadbetter, Hazelmere Park, Bucks. 
Miss F. Memory, Hatfield, Herts. 
Mrs. C. Prioleau, Loxwood House, Billinghurst. 
W. D. Trickett, Lench House, Waterfoot, Man 

Chester. 
W. R. Temple, Ormonde, Datchet, Bucks. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Rotterdam. 
H. C. Walker, Tyrie, West Park, Leeds. 
* * * * 

It is our intention to publish in our Vlth 
Number for October a complete list of Subscribers 
up to date. 

The subscription is only 6/- per annum, or 
6d. per copy, post free, under cover. 

Enough interesting matter is on hand from 
well-known writers to fill the Magazine for the 
next twelve months. 

Back numbers, 6d. each, can always be 
obtained. We should be pleased to receive the 
names of new Subscribers without any delay, to 
enable us to complete our list of names for Octo- 
ber. 

The Editor of this Magazine, not being a 
Country Esquire, hopes to receive the support of 
every lover of Natural History. 



The following Articles will appear from time to 
time as opportunity occurs : — 
"How I became a Naturalist." 
"Why I went to the Congo." 
"My Second Visit to the Congo." 
"Gorilla Dealing — Alive and Dead." 



"A true acount of the origination of the Wild 
Beast Business in Great Britain." 

"The Peculiarities of this Unique Business." 

"My Visit to South Africa." 

"The Advent of the Boxing Kangaroo and the 
Wrestling Lion. " 

"Concerning 'Peter,' one of the most famous 
Chimpanzees of the Age; also on the train- 
ing of Chimpanzees in genera]." 

"The Arrival and Landing of the Barnum and 
Bailey Show, 1899." 

"My Expedition to Dyers Islands, Cape of Good 
Hope, resulting in the capture of 125 Pen- 
guins and 12 Cape Sea Lions." 

"Ivory Buying in the French Congo." 

" How I attempted to corner the Monkey Mar- 
ket thirty years ago, and lamentably failed." 

"An impression of the Zoological Gardens at 
Regents Park, Dublin, Bristol, Edinburgh, 
Halifax and Manchester." 



PROTECTION OF AUSTRALIAN 
BIRDS. 

The following Proclamation, published in 
"The Government Gazette," April 21st, 1911, at 
Port Darwin, N.W. Australia, will doubtless in- 
terest the readers of this Magazine : — 



PROCLAMATION. 



Australia to wit. 



Dudley, Governor-General. 



By His Excellency the Right Honorable Wil- 
liam Humble, Earl of Dudley, a Member 
of His Majesty's Most Honorable Privy 
Council, Knight Grand Cross of the Most 
Distinguished Order of S;iinl Michael 

and Saint George, Knighl Grand Cross <>i 
the Royal Victorian Order, Governor- 
General and Commander-in-Chief of the 

Commonwealth of Australia. 



2 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



WHEREAS by the Customs Act 1901-19101 it 
is enacted that the Governor-General may, by 
Proclamation, ^prohibit the exportation of any 
goods, the prohibition of the exportation of which 
is, in his opinion, necessary for the preservation 
of the flora or fauna of Australia : 

And whereas, in the opinion of the Governor- 
General, the prohibition of the exportation of the 
birds mentioned in the schedule hereunder, or of 
the plumage, skins, and eggs (or eggshells) of such 
birds, is necessary for the preservation of the fauna 
of Australia. 

Now therefore, I, William Humble, Earl of 
Dudley, the Governor-General aforesaid, acting 
with the advice of the Federal Executive Council, 
do hereby prohibit the exportation of the birds 
mentioned in the schedule hereunder, and the 
plumage, skins and eggs (or eggshells) of such 
birds, unless it is proved to the satisfaction of the 
Comptroller-General of Customs that the birds, 
or the plumage, skins and eggs (or eggshells) 
thereof, are being exported for educational or 
scientific purposes. 

Schedule. 

Emus '. Dromaeidae. 

Terns and Gulls Laridae. 

Egrets, Herons and Bittens Ardeidae. 

Lorikeets Loriidse. 

Cockatoos Cacatuidae. 

Parrots Psittacidae. 

Dollar or Roller Birds Coraciidae. 

Kingfishers Alcedinidae. 

Bee-eaters Meropidae. 

Cuckoos ". Cuculidae. 

Lyre Birds Menuridae. 

Pittas Pittidae. 

Robins Muscicapidae genus Petrocea. 

Ground Thrushes and Chats Turdida?. 

Wrens Sylviidae genus Malurus. 

Shrike Tits Thickheads and Shrike Robins 

Laniidae genera Falcunculus, Pachycephala, 
Eopsaltria. 

Sun Birds Nectariniidae. 

Bower Birds Ptilonothypchidse. 

Rifile Birds Paradiscidae. 

Grebes Podicipedidae. 

Albatrosses Diomedeidae. 

Finches Ploceidae. 

Orioles Oriolidae. 

Shining Starlings ... Eulabetidae genus Calornis. 
Given under my hand and the Great Seal of 
the Commonwealth, at Melbourne, this 
Seventeenth day of March, in the year 
One thousand nine hundred and eleven, 
and in the first year of His Majesty's 
reign. 

By His Excellency's Command. 
(l.s) FRANK G. TUDOR, 

Minister of State for Trade and Customs. 
God save the King ! 



TIGER v. MAN. 

The following anecdote was told by a gentle- 
man who had lived for many years in the East 
Indies. 

He was sauntering along the bank of a stream 
in that part of the Globe. On the opposite bank 
he observed a native engaged in washing clothes. 
This was a usual sight in that district, and at- 
tracted no attention at first on his part. He con- 
tinued his walk, when suddenly he was somewhat 
astonished to see that the washerman had. stopped 
work, and had become motionless, crouching over 
the edge of the stream holding the garment he was 
washing as if he was carved in stone. 

Our friend thought the man was taken ill. 
He moved towards him with accelerated pace. 
The native did not appear to notice his approach. 

As he drew nearer he happened to glance at 
the long grass which covered the greater part of 
the plain on the opposite bank of the brook. To 
his surprise he beheld the body and head of a tiger 
creeping towards the native. The animal was but 
a few yards away from his contemplated prey, 
and the native he was stalking seemed quite un- 
aware of the peril he was in. 

Our friend was unarmed. He carried only 
a walking stick. However, he shouted a warning 
to the washerman. The man remained unmoved ; 
and the lithe body of the tiger, which had now- 
approached to> within 15 feet of him, came flying 
through the air with a spring towards the stream, 
intent upon his meal. 

Like a flash of lightning the man dropped his 
piece of linen, drew the sharp heavy knife which 
hung suspended from his body, and leapt on one 
side. 

The beast came down on all fours on the 
spot where the native had been a second or two 
previously. 

The man simultaneously sprang into the air, 
and came down upon the tiger. He drove his keen 
blade into the creature's back just behind the 
head, severing its spine, and killing it instantly* 

Our friend stood wrapped in admiration and 
wonder at the nerve and agility of the native. He 
approached the victor who was standing besides 
his slain foe. Conversation followed, and our 
friend learnt that his informant had heard the tiger 
coming; that he knew it was stalking him; that 
he waited motionless in order that he might gain 
time till he heard the beast lash his tail through 
the grass, which would be the signal for his spring. 
When the tiger sprang the man sprang also, with 
the result as above stated. His pluck and readi- 
ness had thus easily outmatched the brute force 
of his antagonist. 

HUGH S. SPENCER, B.A. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



THE STATUS OF THE WOLVES 
IN FRANCE. 

By Pierre Amedee Pichot. 

As a sequel to what the Menagerie Magazine 
has published concerning wolves, it may be inter- 
esting to know how many of those carnivora have 
been killed during the last few years in France. 
A near estimation of their numbers can be derived 
from the bounties which are granted every year 
by the Authorities for each head of wolf destroyed 
by gun, trap or poison. The premiumsi are rated : 
£8 for a wolf having assailed some human being; 
£3 for a she-wolf in pup; £2 for a full-grown wolf 
or barren female; and 16/- for a cub. 

It is a long time since any man-eaters have 
been reported, and premiums paid accordingly. I 
find nine in 1883; one in 1884; two in 1887; one 
in 1888; and one in 189G. The highest returns 
have been 1,316 wolves killed in 1883, and 1,039' 
in 1884. From that time the number has been 
progressively decreasing to come down to next 
to nothing last year when the premiums were 
claimed for only eighteen animals as shown in 
the following list : — 



1900 


She Wolves 

in Pup. 

1 


Wolves and barren 
females. 

52 


Cubs 

62 


1901 


1 


64 


90 


1902 





41 


32 


1903 


1 


37 


61 


1904 


1 


31 


60 


1905 


3 


27 


63 


1906 


3 


36 


47 


1907 


2 


24 


40 


1908 


1 


20 


41 


1909 


1 


30 


37 


1910 





9 


9 


1911 


4 


16 


17 


1912 


3 


12 


6 


1913 





19 


23 


1914 


1 


9 


12 



making a total of one thousand and fourty-one 
wolves accounted for in the last period of fifteen 
years. The last two years' wolves were killed in 
the following Departments : — Chareate, Dor- 
dogne, Meurthe et Moselle, Vienne, Haute Vienne 
and Vosges, and I dare say the official bounties 
were not claimed for a certain number, but the 
fact is that wolves are no longer numerous enough 
to be the sole object of the pursuit of several 
special packs as during the first half of last 
century. May-be that after the war we shall have 
a revival of the wolfish population as it has always 
occurred after periods of fighting and invasions; 
the wild animals being troubled in their secluded 
resorts by the strifes of humanity are prone to 
seek the regions which have kept out of the tur- 
moil, and already in some of our forest tracts the 
wild boars are reported to have been migrating 



in large quantities from the North. The boars 
are generally followed by the wolves, wild pig 
being their favourite quarry when sheep folds are 
well guarded. 

Amongst the wolves reported as above, a 
certain number may have been hybrids. The 
cross with sheep dogs are pretty frequent, the 
she-wolf, when in season and deprived of her 
mate, not being very particular as to whom she is 
courted by. These hybrids are very dangerous, 
not being so> shy as the genuine animal, and com- 
mit great havocs in the flocks. Count le Couteulx 
de Canteleu has had three litters of the kind 
under his notice in Normandy which he hunted 
down, but they gave a poor chase, not being 
inclined to run, crouching before the hounds who 
did not like them and showing fight. 

Having tested the scenting qualities of the 
wolves and their staying powers, Count le Cou- 
teulx de Canteleu had infused wolf blood in his 
pack, and several of his hounds, by selective mat- 
ings, were seven-eights hound and one-eight wolf. 
These, at the opening of the Franco-German War 
in 1870 1 , being obliged to part with his pack, he 
sold to Mr. Waldron Hill, then master of otter 
hounds in E. Lothian. "They and their progeny," 
writes Sir Walter Gilbey in his work on "Hounds 
in Old Days," "were considered the finest hounds 
ever seen on the line of an otter. The great objec- 
tion to them was their ferocity though, while 
actually hunting, they were peculiarly amenable to 
discipline." 



THE FAUNA OF OLD BRITAIN. 

By Hugh S. Spencer, B.A. 

At a short distance above the spot where the 
River Kennet joins the Thames, the following dis- 
coveries, were made during the year 1881, to the 
writer's own knowledge. 

The ground is historic. Here it was thai the 
great invading army which had landed in East 
Anglia in the year 866 and conquered the 
North and Midlands, was attacked in 871 by the 
men of southern England under King Elhelred I. 
and his brother Alfred in a battle in which the 
Berkshiremen distinguished themselves, as they 
have so often done since. 

The finds were made during dredging opera- 
tions carried on in the bed of the river. They 
consisted of a great number of bones attributable 
to the furred and feathered inhabitants of our 
island in the far away past. 

The bones were mostly black in colour. This 
was due to the peaty soil in which they had lain 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



for centuries. The creatures they belonged to 
had probably been drowned in flobds higher up 
the valley, and washed down by the rapid stream. 
The volume of the current may have slackened at 
this place, and this would account for the deposit 
of bones there. 

These animals were represented; red, roe and 
fallow deer. Many antlers were found, some of 
which had been shed in the course of nature, while 
others had part of the skull attached to them, 
which showed the marks made by the knife in 
skinning the animal. Some of the red deer antlers 
were of considerable size. It has been stated 
that while the red and roe deer are indigenous 
to our country, the fallow deer was introduced 
by the Romans. Jaws, teeth, and other bones of 
deer were of frequent occurrence. 

The great wild ox of ancient Europe, which 
was known as the Urus, was also represented. 
This large bovine is distinct from the European 
bison still existing in Russia, and is now extinct. 
Julius Caesar mentions it as' inhabiting the vast 
Hercynian Forest of Central Europe in his time. 
He speaks of its size and ferocity towards man 
and beast, and tells us that it was captured in 
pits. We read of it existing in Europe during the 
Fourteenth Century. Its huge horns had a double 
curvature forwards and downwards. In a cavern 
there has been discovered a contemporary picture 
of a primaeval hunter stalking one of these huge 
wild bulls. It is engraved on ivory. The animal 
is shown grazing, while a man is creeping up 
behind him with a flint tipped spear in his hand, 
ready for striking his quarry in a vital part when 
he gets near enough. I recollect seeing lying on 
the bank of the Rennet parts of the skulls of the 
Urus with the great horn cores attached to them. 
Huge, indeed, they were ! No British ox carries 
such headgear now. 

The small domesticated ox of Roman British 
times was represented with his small horns, as 
was also the diminutive breed of sheep that in- 
habited our country. In fact, owing to the perils 
of wild carnivora, birds o7 prey, and robbers, the 
shepherd had a hard time in Britain until the 
introduction of strong government rendered it 
possible for sheep to be kept in large numbers in 
the open. 

Tusks, jaws, teeth and bones of the wild boar 
were also found. One fine tusk is now in Reading 
Museum. Piers Plowman's poem of the Four- 
teenth Century describes the farmer advising the 
knight to hunt the boars : — 
" Go and hunt hard 

The hares and the foxes, 
The boars and the badgers, 
That break down my hedges." 

Bones and teeth of the otter, and the fox, 
were, of course, present. 



An especially interesting discovery was the 
skull of a beaver. This animal was hunted in 
Wales during the Twelfth Century for its fur. 

The swan, wild goose, heron, and other birds, 
were represented. 

Some of these bones were collected and classi- 
fied, but, unfortunately, many were ground up for 
manure. Probably had a careful and systematic 
collection been made, bones of the brown bear, 
the eagle, and the bustard, would have been recog- 
nised, and the wild cat too. 

Most probably the wolf was among the num- 
ber. Teeth and bones of the canine race were 
numerous. This may provoke a smile, but these 
bones were ancient. Britain was long ago noted 
for its breed of dogs. I possessed a large jaw 
which I was told was possibly that of a wolf, but 
from what I have since seen of wolf's jaws, the 
teeth of this particular specimen do not appear 
large enough for a wolf's teeth. 

Discoveries such as the above indicate to us 
the antiquity of the globe we live on, and the con- 
tinuity of thought that runs through everything. 
It is remarkable how our knowledge of the past 
has been increased during the last fifty years. 
This is not mere speculation, nor is it an idle 
dream. We know what our country was like in 
that distant time. Perhaps the veil that hides the 
future will one day be uplifted too. 

The war that is now going on is a mere 
nothing in the story of the earth, appalling though 
the war is to this generation. 



WILD ANIMALS AS HOUSE PETS. 

By Robert Leadbetter. 

" JOHNNIE " 
(continued from No. 4, Vol. I.). 



"Johnnie's" affection for "The Tortoiseshell 
Lady" was extraordinary, and I soon found, if I 
wanted him to go anywhere, or do anything, I had 
only to pick up the kitten. 

If you put her in an arm-chair, he would clam- 
ber up immediately beside her, or follow you 
closely, as long as you carried her ! 

As "Johnnie" grew bigger and stronger, the 
servants began to fight rather shy of him — not 
because there was any harm in him, but just 
because he was a lion cub; so I had a little house 
made, to stand in a recess in my study, and here 
I put him each night to sleep with his kitten; but 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Hamltm's gtmagtxu iEaxja^itu. 



Published on the 15th of each month. 



Editorial and Business Office (pro tem) : — 

221, ST. GEORGE'S STREET, LONDON, E. 
Telephone : Avenue 6341. 
Telegrams : " Hamlyn, London Docks, London." 



Advertisement Rates, very reasonable, on application. 



The Editor will be glad to receive for publication articles 
and all interesting photos, the imports and exports of all 
stock, and foreign adventures with all wild stock. The 
subscription is b/- per ann., or 6d. per copy, post free, 
which will be sent under cover. The success of the 
Magazine depends entirely on the support given by the 
general public. Kindly fill up and return the enclosed slip. 



directly after breakfast, both had the whole room 
again to run in till evening - , and while the weather 
was cold spent most of their time sitting or sleep- 
ing in front of the fire. 

"Johnnie" would watch the flames for minutes 
at a stretch — intensely watch them, just as 
though he saw there what we could not. He 
became very friendly, and loved to sit on my lap, 
and even when quite big would struggle to find 
room there, but he never once used his claws, or 
the whole time that he was a house pet, even tried 
to hurt me or anyone else. 

When the warm spring days came, I thought 
he should go out on the lawn, so as my study 
window is not two feet from the floor, inside or 
outside, I opened: it wide one afternoon, and pick- 
ing up "The Tortoiseshell Lady" — or "Janie," as 
we (ailed her by then — stepped over the sill and 
out. 

"Johnnie" wanted no asking; he was after 
me and his cat at once. 

For a day or two, when we all three went out, 
he was nervous, but when he got over it, he and 
the kitten would race round the lawn — she up a 
tree — he standing on his hind legs at the bottom 
trying to reach her — then when she did come 
"down, away they went again, such games ! 

He would catch her, perhaps, and hold her 
in his paws, but never roughly. 

One day, I took him down the drive; it was 
nice summer weather then, and we went quite a 
way, when a water-barrel — iron, and on iron 
wheels — carrying water for the cattle, came ratt- 
ling along. 

This was altogether too much for "Johnnie" ! 
For a moment he stood staring at the cart-horses, 
wondering where all the noise came from, then 
turned tail and ran, ran for all he was worth, 
home, and when I and "The Tortoiseshell Lady" 
got there, he had not only jumped in at my study 
window, but into his house, in the corner of the 
room, too ! 



But he grew and got big, and got bold ! 

One of the house dogs used to hunt the cats. 
"Johnnie" had seen him do it on the lawn from 
my study window. 

One morning, " Boss" came into my room, 
"Johnnie" thought, to hunt "The Tortoiseshell 
Lady." Possibly he was right! 

Anyhow, the Irishman received such a fright ! 
he never darkened that door- way again. The 
youngster's love for the kitten was pathetic; he 
couldn't bear her out of his sight. 

"Johnnie" grew and grew, and his house in 
the corner of the room became too small. 

So a new and larger bedroom was ordered. 
It would fill the whole recess and more, but "John- 
nie" was a year now. 

In due course it came home — it was painted 
green — it was a mansion ! I had to clear some of 
the furniture out of my study. 

I was pleased with it, and so was "Johnnie"; 
he lay and rolled in his straw — clean every night 
—and played with "The Tortoiseshell Lady" and 
I said good-night to them and went to bed. I did 
not sleep near the study, but other members of 
the household did. 

In the middle of the night, after much knock- 
ing, I am a sound sleeper, I was awakened by the 
butler. "That lion in your study, sir, is very ill, 
and I should say, in great pain by the way he is 
moaning." I jumped out of bed and set off down 
stairs. Was it the meat he had had for supper, 
or what was causing all the pain? — I could hear 
him moaning clearly enough now. 

"Why, Johnnie lad, what ever's up?" I said 
rushing into the room. 

Then we had the light. 

"Johnnie" was trembling all over, his nose 
pushed tightly between the bars. ' 

"He's got fits!" I heard the man say behind 
me. Certainly, he did stare oddly at one corner 
of the room, and I felt rather at a loss myself. 

"Let's have another light," I said; then I 
followed the direction or his staring eyes. 

"The Tortoiseshell Lady" was sitting over 
there, busy mousing ! 

"Johnnie" was bigger, the bars of the new 
"mansion" were wider apart, she could not resisl 
the mice, and had pushed out between them, 
leaving poor "Johnnie" heart broken! 

The next day, before bed time, wire netting 
went up ! 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



In the evening, after dinner, "Johnnie" 
usually came and sat close to my mother, resting 
his head on the chair she sat on, and would often 
lick her hand. He was always fed (a bowl of raw 
meat) just before ten o'clock, and punctually, at 
about five minutes to, he would get up, and com- 
mence walking up and down before the fire place, 
occasionally looking towards the door, but he 
never left his beat. 

His bowl was given him on the hearth rug, 
and no one but "The Tortoiseshell Lady" ever 
went near him till it was empty ! 

His bones (raw, of course) I always, gave him 
when he went to bed to amuse him in his straw. 

Except for shutting him in at night, and on 
very rare occasions in the day time, I treated him 
much as I should a large dog. 

At a year and eight months he was a big 
strapping chap, and I thought he should go back 
to the dens, but my mother thought he was un- 
happy there, so back he came to his "mansion" 
in my study and, of course, "The Tortoiseshell 
Lady," too. 

For nearly another year he stayed in the 
house, but "Johnnie" was never treated like an 
ordinary lion, and after then came in to see 
visitors. He was just a "great good tempered 
thing," except when he had his meat or bones — 
then no one must go near. "The Tortoiseshell 
Lady" was the one privileged person ! 



Mr. G. 0. STARR DEAD. 

It is with very great regret that I announce 
the death of Mr. G. O. Starr, late Manager of the 
Crystal Palace, which occurred at Sydenham last 
week. 

Some twenty-six years ago, I heard that the 
celebrated American Combination comprising the 
Barnum and Bailey Show were coming to Europe, 
making London their first port of call. 

The same day I received that information, I 
cabled the American Headquarters of the Barnum 
Show offering to undertake the landing and clear- 
ing of their vast show. 

I undertook, firstly, to obtain the necessary 
permits for landing the various live stock from 
The Board of Trade, and pass the usual declara- 
tions through the Customs. 

To arrange for the reception of the Show in 
The Royal Albert Docks, Gallions Basin, also the 
very serious question of charges incidental thereto, 



this entailed many visits to Leadenhall Street 
where the figures were finally adjusted. I might 
say, in passing, that the Head of that Depart- 
ment at that time — Mr. Lefeaux — gave us every 
possible facility to expedite all matters in connec- 
tion with rates and charges, to arrange with the 
various Railway Companies and Contractors for 
the delivery of show material at Olympia. 

And finally to pilot the show from The Royal 
Albert Docks to Olympia, Kensington, which took 
place three nights in succession, leaving Gallions 
Royal Albert Dock about midnight and arriving 
at Olympia about six in the morning. For three 
nights the streets of London were disturbed by 
the greatest procession that ever was or will be 
seen in connection with circus life. 

The Elephants, Zebras, Camels, Deer, etc., 
all marched through silently and swiftly without 
accident. 

They were, of course, all trained animals, 
but the led Elks, Stags, and other Deer, was the 
most wonderful sight that ever I saw. 

The receipt of my cable at Bridgeport, Conn., 
rather startled the working partner, Mr. James A. 
Bailey. He wondered what sort of Englishman 
would dare to undertake the clearing and landing 
of his vast aggregation of novelties. However, 
much to my surprise, a cable arrived instructing 
me to call ati the Strand offices to interview Mr. G. 
O. Starr. That was my first introduction to that 
gentleman, who ultimately proved to be the most 
genial and kind-hearted man that ever I met in 
connection with show life. Mr. Starr was very 
brief and to the point. What guarantee could I 
give to carry out what was really a great under- 
taking? He explained that the slightest delay 
would mean disaster. 

I suggested that he should accompany me to 
the various Government Departments, also the 
Dock office. Our first visit was to The Board of 
Agriculture, and I presume that the manner in 
which I arranged that particular business con- 
vinced him that there was no fear of my failing to 
carry out the work in its entirety. Terms were 
there and' then arranged, and the landing of the 
show proceeded without accident or delay. 

One incident in connection with this work I 
shall never forget. On the evening of the third 
day, after delivering the last portion of the Show, 
I was sent for by Mr. Starr. He was with Mr. 
James A. Bailey. On entering the private office, 
both gentlemen rose, shaking my hand very en- 
thusiastically, and at the same' time tendering 
their thanks for delivering the Show to time and 
without accident. 

Mr. Starr's grip was the heartiest shake that 
I ever received in connection with business life. 
My last interview with him was some twelve 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



months ago at the Crystal Palace; we chatted of 
old times, of those already gone, of the wonderful 
change taking place in travelling show life, and 
finally of the passing of the Crystal Palace from 
the amusement public for ever. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



The "Star," 10th September, gives the fol- 
lowing : — 

VARIED CAREER OF CRYSTAL PALACE 
EX-MANAGER. 

The death of Mr. G. O. Starr, ex-manager 
of the Crystal Palace, has just been announced. 

Mr. Starr was once the manager of Barnum 
and Bailey's Show. He was the mildest- 
mannered showman that ever ran a circus. 

He never talked of himself, and people who 
were familiar with the genial, quietly-dressed, 
self-effacing man, whose rotund figure every 
visitor to the Palace recognised, rarely knew 
that he had been by turn : — 

A doctor of medicine. 

An officer of the United States Army. 

A popular entertainment provider. 

A journalist. 

A publicity expert. 

A discoverer of freaks. 

The manager of the world's biggest circus. 
It was possible even to know Mr. Starr well and 
never suspect that he Mas an American by birth. 

A MEDICAL MAN. 

But he was born in the State of Connecticut 
G6 years ago, and he lived and practised as a 
doctor there. 

He took up amusement providing by way of 
mental medicine, prescribing a circus perform- 
ance instead of a bottle of medicine, a dose of 
clowning rather than a pill. 

He found this so successful that he ceased 
to dispense his medicine in bottles, but wrapped 
it in the canvas of the circus tent. He filled his 
pharmacy with equestriennes and trapeze per- 
formers, ring masters and clowns, oranges and 
sawdust, naptha lights and garish chariots, and 
before he was thirty, after spending a year or 
two in a New York newspaper office, he became 
Press agent to the Greatest Show on earth. 

FREAK COLLECTOR. 

Nine years later he became European mana- 
ger and freak hunter for the show. He knew 
that to find the dog-faced boys he had to go to 
Odessa or Java or Japan, that the best place to 
pick up midgets was on the bank of the Danube 
river, that the North of China was the likeliest 
place to find giants, that Corea was the most 
fruitful country for physically-connected twins; 



and so on through the whole gamut of the Bar- 
num freaks. 

Chong, one of the giants he discovered, 
provided a real as distinct from a Press agent's 
sensation. He disappeared from his New York 
lodgings, and was never found, alive or dead. 

Mr. Starr always declared that no show was 
complete without its fat woman, and that sen- 
sational acts of the " Dip of Death" kind were 
necessary but undesirable. 

Equestrian acts were pretty but not vital. 
Elephants were perennially in demand, but mon- 
keys were indispensable. 

He was intimately connected also with 
Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show, and introduced 
into it "Zazel," the human cannon ball — a lady 
who became Mrs. Starr. With her he ran for 
a time an opera company. 

MANAGER OF BARNUM AND BAILEY'S. 
In 1906 he succeeded Mr. James A. Bailey 
as manager of Barnum and Bailey's, and a year 
later he settled at Upper Norwood, and became 
manager of the Crystal Palace. 

He was responsible for the development of 
the sports section, which has been so successful 
there, and he introduced the zoological collec- 
tion, which has been a feature in recent years. 
He had taken his circus to entertain most 
of the crowned heads of Europe and several 
Presidents of the United States. "Presidents," 
he once declared, "are very fond of circuses. 
They make very good spectators, and are partial 
to> freaks." 
["Zazel" was introduced to the British Public at 
the Royal Aquarium, Westminster', over 30 
years ago by that celebrated Showman 
Farini, and I remember well the first per- 
formance on a Monday afternoon. — J.D.H.] 



ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY 
OF IRELAND. 

The Council met on the 4th September, Dr. 
R. R. Leeper, Vice-President, in the chair. Also 
present — Professor Scott, acting Hon. Secretary; 
Dr. MacDowel Cosgrave, Hon. Treasurer; W. E,. 
Peebles, Esq.; Dr. R. F. Scharff, Dr. A. K. Ball, 
Mr. Justice Boyd, James Inglis, Esq.; Professor 
Mettam, Sir F. W. Moore, and H. F. Stephens, 
Esq. 

The acting secretary announced the donation 
of a rabbit from Mr. Leo Ward, a sparrow hawk 
from Miss Baker, and a white rat from Cadet W. 
G. Rochfort Wade. Thanks were voted to the 
donors. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Visitors to the Gardens for the week num- 
bered 3,725. 

The band on Wednesday is still performing 
attractive programmes, and while the fine weather 
lasts visitors should avail themselves of this oppor- 
tunity every Wednesday afternoon of hearing 
popular music under pleasant conditions, as the 
season will soon be at an end. 

Some members of the Council interested in 
golf are hoping to lay out a putting course on one 
of the slopes, which would make, from a golfing 
point of view, a very good nine-hole putting 
course. Members having a spare hour would be 
enabled to practice their strokes when visiting the 
Gardens, and it is hoped the project will mature 
shortly. 

The attendance at the gate has improved dur- 
ing this last month, and the Gardens staff, though 
depleted by men joining the Army, have managed 
to keep the Gardens in good condition notwith- 
standing the shortage on the staff. 



BIRTH OF A CHIMPANZEE IN 
CAPTIVITY. 

Madame Abreu, of Habana, Island of Cuba, 
has sent us a most interesting photograph of her 
adult Chimpanzee, with a young one born in 
captivity. 

Madam Abreu writes : — 
"I am sending a bad photo of my baby Chim- 
"panzee, the first born in captivity. I have 
"given this information to the various scientific 
" societies. The baby is as bright as an ordinary 
"child." 

It is unfortunate that the photo is not more 
distinct, for the youngster can only just be seen 
on the back of its mother. The mother is cer- 
tainly one of the largest Chimpanzees ever seen 
in captivity; it is, however, exceptionally tame and 
affectionate towards its negro attendant. 

We trust to give the readers of this Magazine 
further particulars of this most interesting event 
later on. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

That the following articles are unfortunately 
crowded out in this number: — "Jack the Mon- 
key Man," "Jumbo," conclusion of "Notes on 
Sette Cama," "English Bird Dealers versus 
Germans" (being a reply to the Article by the 
Editor of the "Avicultural Magazine), "A Study 
in the Evolution of the Gorilla and Chimpanzee, 



and its bearing on the Evolution of Man," (by 
Professor Arthur Keith, M.D., LL.D.), with 
ether most interesting matter. 

That the most interesting and valuable collection 
of birds, with a few animals, that have ever 
been seen in this country arrived last week on 
the "Avon" from South America. They were 
specially collected by Mr. Walter Goodfelkvw 
on the account of Mr. E. J. Brooke. The fol- 
lowing animals arrived : — 1 Kinkajou, 1 Ocelot, 
1 Tayra, 1 Tree Porcupine, 1 Armadillo, 1 
Squirrel Monkey, 2< Negro Marmosets, 4 Squir- 
rels, with some 250' Tanagers and other birds. It 
is indeed a most remarkable collection, and 
reflects the highest credit on Mr. Goodfellow. 
To attempt to give a full account of this collec- 
tion is impossible at present, there being so 
many specimens new to> science. They are in- 
deed well worth a visit. 

That Mr. E. A. Pratt has brought home and 
deposited in the Zoological Gardens, Regents 
Park, 11 Wilson's Bird of Paradise (Schlegetia 
Wilsons) this species being only found in the 
Papuan Islands. It is a small bird about the 
size of a thrush with remarkable colouring. 

That during last week the Clifton Zoological 
Gardens had a happy surprise in the arrival from 
West Africa of a Chimpanzee. She is very 
fine for her age, being a little under one year 
old and very docile. She has had as a com- 
panion a charming, half-grown moustache mon- 
key. Both of these very attractive specimens 
have been obtained direct from abroad, and 
presented by Mr. Mervyn King, who, by the 
way, is one of the oldest members of the com- 
mittee and a true supporter of the society. The 
Chimpanzee is in splendid condition, having had 
every care and attention during the voyage. 
She is bound to prove a great attraction to all 
visitors, and will be found "at home," with her 
companion, in the specially constructed compart- 
ment in the bird house. 

That the number of visitors to the Scottish Zoo- 
logical Park, Edinburgh, last week was 14,477, 
making a total since the opening of 545,811. 

That the arrivals in London have been some 40 
Cape Finches, 20 Tanagers, 2 Conures, 2,000 
Canaries, 2i Triangular Spotted Pigeons, 6 Mon- 
keys, 400' Budjerigars, etc., etc. 

That the arrivals in Liverpool have been 1 small 
Chimpanzee, G Coatimondis, 1 Armadillo, 1 
Drill Baboon, 6 Grey Parrots, with a few Mon- 
keys. 

That general stock is very scarce. Ordinary mon- 
keys and birds are commanding very high 
prices, the various duplicates advertised for sale 
are eagerly acquired at absurd prices. 



Printed by W. J. Hasted & Son, (T.U.), 306, MileJEnd Road, London, E. 



Telegrams: Hamlyn, London Docks, London, 



Telephone : 6341 Avenue 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station. 

Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence five minutes walk. 
P.O.O. payable at Leman Street, East. Cheques crossed " London County &> Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TERMS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from time of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back. TELEPHONE. — Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS. — Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIVERY. — Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

The arrivals from abroad during the past month have been very small. Particulars are j;iven in " General Notes." 
Several dealers are making collections in different parts of the World. One is on the West Coast of Africa ; another is in Australia. 
There are a few animals on the way from South Africa. 



To arrive from East London in 14 day: — 

1 Pair Blessboks in fine condition ■ „ • !•__*:__ 

1 South African Wattled Crane Pr,ce on »PP»'«*'on. 



20 Canadian Black White Skunks ... ... each 80/6 

These take the place of the Indian Mongoose for rats and 
all vermin. They are entirely devoid of any objectionable 
smell, the scent bacs being abstracted. The only Skunks at 
present for sale in Great Britain, and will not be sold less 
than 80/6 each. 

The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at The Zoologi- 
cal Society's Gardens, Regents Park, London : — 
4 Heloderma suspectum ... ... ... each 40/6 

3 Stink pot Terrapins ... ... ... ... ,, 12/6 

" Texas Terrapin ... ... ... ... 12/6 

2 American Green Tree Frogs ... ... ... ,, 5/6 

1 ,, Alligator, 3^ feet ... ... ... 70/6 

2 ,, King Snakes ... ... ... ,, 25/6 

2 ,, Mocassin Snakes ... ... ... ,, 25/6 

Chicken Snake ... ... ... 25/6 

Hognosed Snake ... ... ... 25/6 



1 good sized Armadillo 
,, Raccoons ... ... ... each 

2 Tame Monkeys, suitable for Mascots, cither on 

sea or land ... ... ... ... ,, 

1 Spinx Baboon — collar and chain 

1 Capucin Ringtail — tame 

2 Kangaroos ... ... ... ... ... each 

1 Russian Bear, perfectly tame, on Collar and Chain 

2 Foxes, adult. 1 Cub ... ... ... lot for 100/- 

Australian Dingoes, dog, bitch and pup... ... lot for 80/- 

Chamelcons, arriving direct from Morocco ... each 7/6 

Jerbous, ,, ,, ,, Egypt ... ,, 7/6 

These are harmless, interesting pets. 
Guinea Pigs ... ... ... 1/6 to 2/- each, 50 for 60/- 



70/6 
50/6 



100/6 

50/6 

£8 

£12 



each 6/6 



Roller Cock Canariei, just commencing to sing ... 
, Hen ,, two beautiful birds, in wicker 

cage ... ... ... 3/-; 14, in 7 cages, 18/- 



2 Polar Bear Cubs ... ... ... ... each 

8 Cape Blackheads, or Alario Finches 
12 ,, Singing Finches, extra large . 
18 „ Rufous backed Mannakins 
1 ,, Hooded Weaver, in full colour 
1 ,, Napoleon Weaver ,, ,, 

200 Budgerigars, adults, very fine for breeding pair 

Hens, 4/- ; Cocks, 2/6 each. 

4 Blackheaded, or Copperheaded, Tanagers ... each 
1 Blue Tanager, very fine 

1 Archbishop Tanager, deep color 
1 Yellow winged Sugar Bird, fine 

1 Blue Sugar Bird, medium condition 

2 Himalayan Tits, seldom imported ... ... ,, 

1 Golden Oriole, hen 

1 Sallees Amazon ... 

1 Blue and Buff Macaw, talking, with good 

serviceable stand ... ... ... for 

1 Red Blue Macaw, very fine ... ... ,, 

3 Orange-flanked Parrakects, all tame, perch on 

finger, great pets ... ... ... each 

1 Grey cheeked Conure, actually talking 
1 Blueheaded Conure, very fine 
1 Half Moon Conure, tame ... 

1 American Ostrich, Rhea 

5 Indian Purple Sun Birds ... Cocks, 60/6; Hens, 

2 Impeyan Pheasants, last year's birds, sup- 

posed females, very fine condition ... each £7 

2 Hen Black-winged Japanese Peafowl ... each 

6 Carolina Ducks drake 15/6 duck 20/6 pair 

4 Common Wood Pigeons (fi months in stockl 



Jungle Fowls cocks 10/6 hens 12/6 

4 Silver Pheasants ,, 12/B ,, 16/6 

6 Golden ,. ,, 16/6 ,, 20 6 

2 Amherst ., ,, 20/6 ., 25/6 

6 Swinhoc ,, ,, 30/6 ,, 40/6 

Cormorants, feed from hand 

Herons, fine condition ... 

Grey Parrot, quite tame, splendid talker 

,, ordinary 

2 pairs Chilo Widgeon, rare 
2 ,, African Triangular Spotted Pigeons 



pair 



£40 
10/6 
10/6 

8/6 
15/6 
15/6 

5/6 

40/6 
40/6 
40/6 
40/6 
25/6 
25/6 
25/6 



£6 
£4 

40/6 
40/6 
30/(5 
15/6 
£10 
60/6 

10/- 
40/6 
30/6 
10/8 
20/6 
25/6 
30/6 
40/6 
65/6 
12/6 
12/6 
£10 
£7 
£3 
50/6 
40/6 



WILLSON'S LIVE STOCK PROVIDERS, Ltd., 

37, New Oxford Street, London, W.C. 

Telephone— Gerrard, 7708. Telegrams— Highbred Westcent, London. Bankers— London County & Westminster. 



LONDON'S CHIEF EMPORIUM FOR DOGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



All our adult dogs are sold on 14 days' trial on condition that if not liked they will be 
exchanged for livestock to value from our stock within this period. 

All our Dogs are daily inspected by a Qualified Veterinary Surgeon. 



.A. VISIT XS BBSPBOTFULLY ZE^EQ.TTIEJSTEilD.. 

E. W. LITTLE, F.Z.S., 

Practical Naturalist and Taxidermist. 

SPECIALIST IN BIG GAME TROPHIES 
AND FISH MOUNTING.- 

Studios: 65, YORK STREET, BAKER STREET, W. 

PADDINGTON 6903. 



THIS SPACE TO LET. 



p 



y(^c 



^ 



Hamlyns 



: 






.^ r ED 



Menagerie 
Magazine. 






No. 6.- Vol. 1. 



OCTOBER, 1915. 



Price Sixpence. 






CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTORY 

WILD BOAR SHOOTING 

NOTE ON THE PRESENT STATE OF THE 
KET IN EUROPE 

PATAGONIAN CAVIES 

THE THEORY OF EVOLUTION 



LIVE FOREIGN 



GENERAL NOTES 



ANIMAL MAR- 



t. 



?Qc 



4 



Hamljtts JEmajjerie JEagajint 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 6.— Vol. 1. 



LONDON, OCTOBER, 1915. 



PRICE SIXPENCE. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

List of Subscribers for September. 

The Lord Rothschild, Museum, Tr'mg. 

\V. A. Harding, Histon Manor, Cambridge. 

Madame Abreu, Habana, Island of Cuba. 

Rev. A. H. Glexxte, Lavant Rectory, Chichester. 

\Y. Oakey, 34, High Street, Leicester. 
* # * * 
LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 

Major Atherley, Croft Castle, Kingsland, Here- 
fordshire. 

Madame Abreu, Habana, Island of Cuba. 

The Director, Royal Zoological Society, Natura 
Artis Magistra, Amsterdam. 

E. H. Bostock, Exhibition Buildings, Glasgow. 

Sir John Bland Sutton, 47, Brook Street, Gros- 
venor Square, W. 

John K. Butter, M.D., Highfield House, Can- 
nock, Staffs. 

Sir Edgar Boehm, Bentsbrooke, North Holm- 
wood, Surrey. 
Miss E. F. Chawner, Forest Bank, Lyndhurst. 

Professor Carpenter, Roval College of Science, 
Dublin. 

Mrs. Cotton, The Mount, Bishopstoke. 
Walter Chamberlain, Pendock Grove, Cobham. 
Capt. Eliot, Leydens House, Edenbridge, Kent. 
Lady Julia Follett, The Woodside, Old Wind- 
sor. 

Rev. A. H. Glknnie, Lavant Rectory, Chichester. 
Miss Hall, 76, Adelaide Road, Hampstead, N.W. 
Miss How.man, 6, Essey Grove, Upper Norwood. 
Rev. Hemsworth, Monks Fryston, S. Milford. 
W. J. Hexxixg, Hillside, New Maiden. 

T. Hebb, Brooklea, Downs Road, Luton. 
W. A. Harding, Histon Manor, Cambridge. 
H. Ide, Elm Lawn, Eden Street, Kingston-on- 
Thames. 



Messrs. Jexxison & Co., Belle Vue, Manchester. 

The Countess of Jersey, Middleton Park, Bices- 
ter. 

William Jamrach, 65, Lordship Road, Stoke 
Newington, N. 

Mrs. E. Jordax t , Connaught Mansions, Battersea. 

The Director, Zoological Gardens, Tokyo, 
Japan. 

Alderman J. D. Kiley, J. P., 33, Gun Street, 
Spitalfields. 

C. F. Leach, Vale Lodge, Leatherhead. 

E. W .Little, 65, York Street, Baker Street. 
The Hon. Mrs,. McLaren Morrison, Queen 

Anne's Mansions, St. James's Park. 

R. T. McGeagh, Mona Lodge, Ramsay, Isle of 
Man. 

J. W. Metcalf, 68, Brunswick Road, Liverpool. 

Dan Mason, Maisonette, Broadstairs. 

Harry Mitchell, Haskells, Lyndhurst, Hants. 

Miss F. Memory, Hatfield, Herts. 

W. Oakey, 34, High Street, Leicester. 

Mrs. L. D. Powers, 25, Gordon Square, W.C. 

L. H. F. Pullar, Dunbarnie Cottage, Bridge of 
Earn. 

Robt. D. Carson, Zoological Gardens, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., U.S.A. 

Mrs. C. Prioleau, Loxwood House, Billinghurst. 

The Director, Zoological Gardens, Rotterdam. 

Gerald Rattigax, Stonehouse, Gloucestershire. 

The Lord Rothschild, Museum, Tring. 

G. de Southoi-k, Leysin, Vaud, Switzerland. 

Dr. SCHARFF, National .Museum, Duplin. 

F. W. Smalley, F.Z.S., M.B.O.U., Challan Hall, 
Silverdale, Carnforth, Lanes. 

Castlerock, Co. Londonderry, 



J. Steel, M.D. 
Ireland. 



II. S. Spenc 
ham Hill. 

W. R. Temple, Ormonde 



109, Barcombe Avenue, Streat- 



Datchct, Bucks 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



W. D. Trickett, Lench House, Waterfoot. 
A. S. Yates, Bishops Sutton, Alresford, Hants. 
S. Williams, 110', Riverway, Palmers Green, N. 
H. C. Walker, Tyrie, West Park, Leeds. 
E. Wuiriox, 7, Rue Theophile Gautier, Neuilly, 
pres Paris. 

Besides the above, we have about 100 Hon- 
orary Members. The monthly distribution to all 
parts of the world amounts to some 1,200 copies; 
this is with a view to obtain new Subscribers. 

The subscription is only 6/- per annum, or 
6d. per copy, post free., under cover. 

Enough interesting matter is on hand from 
well-known writers to fill the Magazine for the 
next twelve months. 

Back numbers, 6d. each, can always be 
obtained. We should be pleased to receive the 
names of new Subscribers without any delay. 

Advertisements are inserted at very reasona- 
ble rates. 

The following Articles will appear from time to 
time as opportunity occurs : — 

"How I became a Naturalist." 

"Why I went to the Congo." 

"My Second Visit to the Congo." 

"Gorilla Dealing — Alive and Dead." 

"A true acount of the origination of the Wild 
Beast Business in Great Britain." 

"The Peculiarities of this Unique Business." 

"My Visit to South Africa." 

"The Advent of the Boxing Kangaroo and the 
Wrestling Lion." 

"Concerning 'Peter,' one of the most famous 
Chimpanzees of the Age; also on the train- 
ing of Chimpanzees in general." 

"The Expedition to Dvers Islands, Cape of 
Good Hope, resulting in the capture of 125 
Penguins and 12 Cape Sea Lions." 

"Ivory Buying in the French Congo." 

" How I attempted to corner the Monkey Mar- 
ket thirty years ago, and lamentably failed." 

"An impression of the Zoological Gardens at 
Regents Park, Dublin, Bristol, Edinburgh, 
Halifax and Manchester." 



"Le Chenil et L'Ecbo de L'Elevage, Journal 
du Jardin Zoologique D'Acclimatation de Paris, 
au Bois de Boulogne," has the following interest- 
ing notice in the 30th September issue : — 

" Le Menagerie Magazine de Hamlyn publie 
une curieuse rencontre qu'un de ses correspon- 
dants a fait d'un tueur de tigres dans les Indes. 
"Le 5e livraison de ce Magazine que Hamlyn 
vient de lancer avec tant de succes contient 
d'autres nouvelles qui pour n'etre pas aussi sen- 



sationnelles que l'aventure que nous venons de 
rapporter n'en sont pas moins interessantes. 
Mme. Abreu, de la Havane fait part de la nais- 
sance d'un jeune Chimpanze. C'est avec la 
naissance d'un jeune Gorille qui eut lieu il y a 
deux ans au Jardin d'Acclimatation le seul cas 
oil les grands singes antropomorphes aient mis 
bas en captivite." 



WILD BOAR SHOOTING. 

By Walter Winans. 

I have shot wild boar in two countries, Bel- 
gium and Germany. In the former country small 
terriers are employed — very few boar-hounds — as 
the latter try to run in too much and get killed, 
also they bustle the boar too much, any fast big 
clog has the same failing, a hound especially, once 
on the line of boar will run them off into the neigh- 
bour's shoot. 

The great point is to drive boar to the guns, 
the dogs going with the beaters, to work through 
thickets too dense for the beaters to beat 
thoroughly. 

The guns are posted, most in front of towards 
where the beaters are driving, but also some guns 
at the sides, or even, if there are enough guns, 
one or two behind. 

These last sometimes get the best chance, the 
largest boar especially those which have been shot 
at and missed in former drives, are very shy of 
coming forward. 

They work up close to the edge of the wood, 
get a whiff of the wind, or a sight of a man and 
break back. 

The great thing is to drive the boar slowly 
and not off the ground, so that they stop in the 
next thicket, if not shot and> can be driven out of 
that later. 

A big or fast dog' clears not only that wood 
but woods for miles round and frightens the boar 
so much they leave the neighbourhood. 

A small yapping dog, plucky enough to hold 
a boar at bay when wounded, but which the 
boar can easily distance by galloping, the dog 
coming back at once as soon as he has chased 
the boar out of the particular wood being- driven, 
is what is wanted. 

The Belgians find this in terriers, the Germans 
in dachshunde. 

I used, when shooting in Belgium, to go to 
the various Dogs Homes in London and buy dogs 
sent there to be destroyed for biting people, or 
general viciousness; the best dog for boar I ever 
had was one condemned to death for biting a 
butcher's boy — I just got there in time to save 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



him being chloriformed. He was afraid of 
nothing;, and would hunt till he dropped. 

The dachshund is the best dog- in my opinion 
of all, as he is so slow and small the boar are 
not inclined to hurry; he has a wonderful nose 
and perseverance in hunting a wounded boar, and 
he is not afraid to tackle the boar. 

I know of one small dachshund who tackled 
one of the litter of an old sow; the sow turned on 
him and he seized her by the nose. When the 
keeper came up the dog was still hanging on to 
the sow's nose, although she had ripped him 
open and his entrels were hanging out. 

The country where boar are shot is very 
dense woods, with narrow rides cut in them, and 
and occasional more open spot; a country utterly 
unridable, it being also generally deep in snow 
during the boar shooting time. 

The difficulty is to break the dogs of running 
riot, i.e., hares, roe deer and foxes. 

The shooting is done with rifles, snap shoot- 
ing at the head and shoulders of boar going at 
top speed, taking care not to shoot sows or too 
young boar. 

The style of rize shooting, lying down and 
aiming at a stationary bull's eye, is useless is boar 
shooting, though it may sometimes be useful in 
deer-stalking. 

A good rabbit shot, with a shot gun, will do 
better even if he has never handled a rifle before, 
than the man who can make the highest possible 
score with a rifle lying down, but has never prac- 
tised at moving objects. 



Note on the present state of the Live 
Foreign Animal Market in Europe. 

By G. DE Southoff. 

(Translated from the Bulletin of the French National 
Acclimatization Society, July, 1915, by F. Finn.) 
The sale of living foreign animals is a fairly 
lucrative and very interesting trade. Unfortun- 
ately it is not yet organised in France, and a good 
number of naturalists and acclimatizcrs have some 
difficulty in obtaining the specimens they want, 
even by offering to pay a high price for them. As 
may have been noted on several occasions in this 
Bulletin, this trade is almost entirely in the hands 
of England and Germany. We propose to take 
a broad survey of it, and pass its present condi- 
tions in review, hoping that the acquaintance with 
these will encourage and facilitate, among the 
dealers of the allied countries, the development of 
this by no means insignificant branch of trade, 
to their own advantage and that of their 
customers. 



In Germany dealers in live foreign animals 
are very numerous. The general idea is that 
Hagenbeck, of Stellingen, near Hamburg, is the 
most important, and to a certain extent this is 
true. Hagenbeck is the largest of best-known 
dealers in savage animals; but others, like Ruhe, 
of Alfeld, who has a branch at New York, August 
Fockelmann and Kuntzschman, of Hamburg, 
Dcrenburg, of Halle, and many others, sell wild 
animals, and their importations of small mammals 
in particuar, are quite numerous as well. When 
old Karl Hagenbeck was alive, he maintained the 
supremacy of his business, and gave it what the 
modern Teuton dealers like to call an " American" 
extensiveness. He even had attached to his es- 
tabishment a naturalist commissioned to makei a 
scientific study of the animals he received. But 
his sons have different ideas of their trade, more 
practical perhaps, and certainly more remunera- 
tive. Twenty years ago the bird market had 
reached its highest position, thanks to the bird- 
trade which Hagenbeck's sister carried on at 
Hamburg, and which resulted, we may as well 
admit, in many very interesting importations. At 
the present moment, there are at Hamburg, Ber- 
lin, Leipzig, Ulm, etc., wholesale: bird dealers 
doing a large trade at very reasonable prices. At 
Hamburg and Altona, too, there arrive, huge 
quantities of living fish and other aquarium ani- 
mals, by the sale of which numerous dealers carry 
on business. These used to import new species 
every year, mostly from tropical Asia and America, 
some of which were very rare. 

As to the trade in Reptiles and Batrachians, 
from Pythons to small Lizards, and from giant 
Salamanders (Megalobatrachus) to foreign Tree, 
frogs (Hylae), it was almost the monopoly of the 
German and Austrian dealers. These were to be 
counted by tens, and were very well found, sending 
out to their patrons very complete price-lists, 
fortified with Latin names. The most important 
are Scholze and Poetzsche, of Berlin, whose 
premises occupy two floors of a building, with a 
lift, and whose up-to-date catalogue contains 
photographs which many works on herpctology 
would envy. These houses deal more particularly 
in foreign Reptiles and Batrachians, but also in 
European species, at incredibly low prices. Some 
used, in addition to their usual trade, to deal in 
Insects and other Invertebrates, and supplied at 
low rates Orthoptera, Coleoptera, Myriapodsi, 
Arachnids, Gastropods, etc., from hot climates. 

In England,, where the love of living .animals 
is so wide-spread, from young Miss's pel to the 
rich Lord's menagerie or zoological garden, the 
animal trade has always flourished exceedingly. 
The ancient renown of Cross, of Liverpool, per- 
haps fairly surpasses Hagenbeck's. I may men- 
tion also, in London, the Jamrach's, and J. D. 
Hamlyn, the greatest importer of Monkeys in 
Europe. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



The trade in birds is one of the best-developed 
among our friends across the Channel, and one 
only needs to glance at the contents of the "Avi- 
cultural Magazine," or of the popular weekly 
"Cage Birds," to be convinced of this. Not only 
do the English import the rarest of birds through 
their dealers, but enlightened amateurs do 1 not 
hesitate to undertake very long voyages to procure 
them, or to commission competent people to seek 
the tenants of their aviaries in their native coun- 
tries. Amateurs of foreign Mammals are equally 
common, and the "Amateur Menagerie Club" has 
been founded with the particular idea of writing 
these. We may congratulate ourselves on estab- 
lishing the fact that England imports as many 
animals as the enemy, and even more, which gives 
us the advantage, meanwhile, of allowing us to' 
supply ourselves from her. 

France, which in past centuries, was at the 
head of the countries which imported the feathered 
and furred denizens of foreign lands, is now, un- 
fortunately, no- more in the same rank. The ani- 
mal dealers of Marseilles, Bordeaux and Havre, 
are few, andi have in many cases been disheartened 
by German competition. Nevertheless, during 
these last few yearsi, there have been some inter- 
esting importations into Havre, among which I 
may mention great quantities of aquarium fish — 
not very rare, it is true — and some wild animals, 
such as Brazilian Tiger-cats (Felis mitis), Russian 
Bears (Ursus arctos), etc. But on the whole the 
arrivals are becoming less numerous. This is a 
gap which wants filling up, for it is in France that 
the Italian and Spanish bird dealers buy their 
stock, the ports of Genoa and Barcelona only im- 
porting very little, and the language being a diffi- 
culty between them and the German dealers. 
Nevertheless, this state of things was about to 
change just before the war, for the bird dealers 
from beyond the Rhine were beginning to send to 
Italy and Spain price-lists in the lang'uage of those 
countries. 

In this survey we have only noticed the Ger- 
man firms to show how strong and well-established 
was their position in the market in question. It 
goes without «saying that the war will alter all 
this, but we ought, from now onwards, to look 
at what must be done so that our patrons may 
leave them after peace is concluded, and only deal 
with our own country's dealers. The Germans 
keep a tight hold on their trade. Here is a case 
in point. Recently one might have read how the 
British Consuls in Holland were instructed by 
their Government to' make quite sure that the 
Canaries exported to England from that country 
were stock raised by Dutch breeders and were not 
imported from Germany for the purpose of re- 
exportation ! This seems a trifle at first sight, 
but our enemies ought not to pocket our money, 
and besides, the imports of Canaries from Holland 



into the United Kingdom amount to the value of 
about 3,000 francs a week, in spite of the war and 
the submarines' blockade. 

Which are the animals which constitute the 
main support of the trade we are considering? In 
the main, Vertebrates generally, some groups 
excepted, and, among the Invertebrates, Insects 
and some others of the lower animals of land and 
water, so interesting to observe in captivity. Of 
these last, we may recall those which are most 
often on sale with the German firms : — Sea-Ane- 
mones (Actiniae), Star-fish (Asteriae), Sea-urchins 
(Echinidae), Lymnaeae and Planorbes, among the 
inhabitants of the sea or of fresh-water; tropical 
Millepedes and Snails, among the land forms. 
(To be continued.) 



PATAGONIAN CAVIES. 

By Pierre Amedee Pichot. 

The importation and acclimatization of foreign 
animals in our country may have different objects 
in view. They may supply a new staple of food 
stuff as game or domestic inmates of the home- 
stead, or be simply ornamental. The Patagonian 
Cavy, the giant Guinea Pig of the South American 
pampas (average weight 18 lbs.), answers to 
several of these requisites. They were first prac- 
tically introduced in France in 1884 by a well- 
known Dutchman, correspondent of the Zoological 
Society in London, Joseph Comely, who resided 
at Tours, and who kept a very large collection of 
animals and birds. He was a long time before 
securing a reliable breeding pair, and now they 
are bred successfully by several fanciers who have 
introduced them in their parks. 

I purchased a pair in 1891 from the Acclima- 
tization Gardens, and they have been doing re- 
markably well in a small park of a few acres in 
which they were let loose. I have had, at times, 
as many as fifteen couples making a very showy 
display on the lawns on which they graze in little 
herds of six or seven individuals. Thoug-h keep- 
ing together in numbers, they generally associate 
by pairs, and the male is very jealous of any in- 
trusion on his family affairs. Chasing any sus- 
pected rival, he can inflict deep gashes with his 
sharp incisor teeth if he catches him. Then they 
have another nasty mode of defence when turning 
their back on the intruder they can squirt their 
urine at two or three yards distance in the face 
of their aggressor. 

The young are born fully developed like some 
other allied rodents : guinea pigs, capybaras and 
agoutis, and a few minutes after birth they are 
able to> stand and to scamper about, but thev want 



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burrow to which they return after their everyday 's 
constitutional walks or as soon as some unusual 
noise or unaccustomed figure startles them, and 
there they live until nearly half grown, when they 
associate with the rest of the herd. 

At my place, the Patagonian Cavies have 
adopted the one and same burrow at the foot of a 
larch on the lawn for all their nursery purposes, 
and it is' often occupied by several litters of differ- 
ent sizes. As this general nursery is just in front 
of my study windows, I have had opportunities 
for observing many interesting particulars of the 
animals' intimate life. On one occasion, a female, 
whose young had been still-born, took to tending 
the young of another couple, and acted as nurse, 




sheltering in a burrow which the parents have only 
just roughly began to excavate in some dry soil 
and which the youngsters set immediately to sink 
deeper and to accommodate to their liking. The 
amount of earth which they draw out is quite mar- 
vellous, and I have never seen the parents give 
any help nor even enter the burrow, though I hear 
they do in some other places. At suckling hours 
male and female come to the entrance and, calling 
their young by a sort of low grunt, they look the 
very image of "Patience sitting on a monument," 
until the young condescend to come out and have 
their repast. The little cavies continue in the 



but after a few days of peaceful community, want- 
ing to have them all to her self, she prevailed on 
the poor innocents to follow her at the far end of 
the park where she hid them under a stack oi 
fagots. The parents, on their return home, not 
finding their young answering to. their call, were 
out of sorts, and began exploring the grounds to 
seek them. When after several hours' search 
they found the truants, they rapidly sent them 
home with a vengeance and administered such a 
thrashing to the unfaithful, nurse thai she no 
longer dared to conic lo I he burrow in the day 
time, but, by moonlight, she again tried to entice 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



her lost pupils, from their home. These, at first, 
came out to see who was calling, but they had 
no doubt received instructions and refused to fol- 
low the discharged maid. 

Another time, when the gardener was carry- 
ing off a dead Patagonian to have it buried, all the 
others followed the man in a single file, and sitting 
in a row around the grave, took as much concern 
in the operation as Hamlet with the sexton's digg- 
ing in the churchyard, after what, cutting a caper 
in the air so much as to say: "Well, our own 
time is not come yet after all !" they dispersed and 
resumed their daily pursuits. 

The Patagonian Cavies have generally two 
young at a birth, sometimes three, seldom only 
one. The period of gestation is three months. 
They are very hardy and keep continually in the 
open at all seasons. Be the weather ever so harsh, 
they seldom make use of the shelters which 
are provided for them. They have got to be very 
tame, and flock round the keeper from all parts 
when they hear his call to get tit-bits in the way 
of bread. In winter time, they are supplied with 
some oatis and roots; in autumn they relish fallen 
fruit which they pick up under the trees in the 
orchard, but they feed principally upon grass and 
cause very little damage to trees and bushes, 
though I take care that the flower-beds should be 
surrounded by a low netting in case they might be 
tempted to offer a nosegay to their sweetheart. 



THE THEORY OF EVOLUTION. 

LECTURE AT THE ROYAL COLLEGE 
OF SURGEONS. 

By Professor Arthur Keith, M.D., 
LL.D., F.R.C.S. 



The Lecturer exhibited a human skeleton and 
skeletons of male and female gorilla, chimpanzee 
and monkeys. In the previous lectures he said he 
had shown that there were two quite distinct types 
of men — modern man and Neanderthal man. He 
had no doubt they both came from a common 
stock, but when they came out of that stock was 
the problem before them. As they had not yet 
found half-human forms as fossils it was 
necessary to study those animals which were 
most like to man and see if they would! throw any 
light on the problem of the date of man's origin. 
There could be absolutely no- doubt as to which 
the nearest allies of man were. Pointing to the 
skeletons the lecturer said it was an accident that 



a door came between the human skeleton and the 
gorilla. But there was a considerable difference. 
In the young the resemblance was closer. There 
was also closer resemblance between the females 
than between the males of the gorilla and man. 
The chimpanzee came next and the difference be- 
tween the male and 1 female in this case was less 
than that of the gorilla. Then the orang. Those 
were all the living animal forms they had got 
to represent man's nearest allies — the gorilla and 
chimpanzee in Africa and the orangs in Borneo 
and Sumatra. A map was put on the screen 
showing the geographical distribution, of these 
animals. The reason for bringing the map before 
them, said the lecturer, was because, the problem 
which faced them was this : In ancient Europe 
there were two distinct types of man — Neander- 
thal man and modern man, and the thesis he 
was going to maintain that afternoon was to show 
that they had in the African anthropoids a simi- 
lar kind of differentiation. Between the gorilla 
and the chimpanzee they had not only the 
same degree of difference, but the same 
kind of difference as between the Neanderthal 
man and the modern type of man. The diagram 
which showed the geographical distribution of 
these animals in the world to-day illustrated how 
limited that distribution was. North and South 
of the Congo was the area of the distribution of 
the gorilla. Although a census had not been 
taken, if he said there were 10', 000 gorillas he did 
not think he would over-estimate the number. 
The chimpanzee occupied a much larger area in 
the great equatorial forest zone. That fact 

brought home to them what the home of the chim- 
panzee was. It lived among trees. The gorilla 
represented the Neanderthal man and the chim- 
panzee represented modern man. There were a 
number of varieties, nations or races of chimpan- 
zees just as of modern man — the living races of 
man. The racial differences in the human crania 
were so slight that they did not recognise the 
race easily from an examination confined to skulls 
only. That was the position they were in with 
regard to the chimpanzees, but he thought there 
were four, or there might be, five kinds. 

The next diagram was a baby gorilla, and 
the lecturer pointed out the features which differen- 
tiated the gorilla from the chimpanzee. The 
gorilla had huge wings to his nose and the charac- 
teristic point was that they went right down to 
the lips; there was no sharp line running cross- 
wise between nose and lip. The ala± of the nose 
were carried down to the lip. Then the ear was 
small and the eyes black in the gorilla. In the 
chimpanzee the alse were quite small. A sharp 
line always separates the nose of the chimpanzee 
from the upper lip. The ear is of a different type. 
Yet both gorilla and chimpanzee ear-types they 
saw in men. The chimpanzee never got quite 
black all over. In psychology the chimpanzee 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



was different from the gorilla. He was playful 
even when he got old. That was a fact they had 
never quite appreciated, and the change in this 
respect was as great in anthropoids as in the 
human race. 

Another picture of a chimpanzee showed a 
different type of animal. Some people thought 
it was a gorilla, but the lines under the 
nose and the ears distinguished it. While the 
chimpanzee and the gorilla were different animals, 
the differences were not great and the degree of 
difference between them represented an interest- 
ing study in evolution. Was it not possi- 
ble that the chimpanzee might be trans- 
formed into the human type? The lecturer pointed 
to the forearm of an adult chimpanzee and indi- 
cated all that was left of the tendon leading to 
the thumb, pointing out that it was impossible for 
such an animal to regain the flexibility of the 
thumb. Therefore it was impossible for an animal 
like that to gain the human condition. That fact 
was not new; it was known to Huxley. Describing 
some of the characteristics of the gorilla and the 
chimpanzee, the lecturer drew a parallel between 
the extinct Neanderthal man and the chimpanzee. 

The next diagram showed differences in 
the size of the brain. As far as size was con- 
cerned they could not draw a sharp line between 
the gorilla and the chimpanzee. They knew the 
brain of Neanderthal man was very big. The 
gorilla brain was bigger than the chimpanzee. 
The arm centres of the brain were big, and the 
centres for the lower extremities showed an equal 
degree of differentiation. The mapping out of 
the cortex would make it possible to compare the 
human and anthropoid brains with a greater 
degree of precision. There was a close resem- 
blance in the motor areas of the gorilla and the 
chimpanzee, but there was slight differences in 
detail. Point for point the two animals were 
almost alike, and yet he thought in nine times out 
of ten he could tell a gorilla brain from that of a 
chimpanzee. Nature had not yet got those two 
forms clearly separately from each other. The 
Island of Reil was completely cut off in the 
gorilla's brain. 

The lecturer proceeded to show the differences 
in the lower jaws of the gorilla and the chimpan- 
zee. The difference in mass was enormous. The 
gorilla, had enormous muscular power and the 
chimpanzee small. The chief difference was in 
the teeth. The difference between the gorilla 
and the chimpanzee in the matter of teeth was 
simply enormous. They had difficulties in the 
matter of distinguishing brains, but in the teeth 
there was no difficulty. With the Neanderthal 
man it was the same; they could tell him by his 
teeth. So they could the o-orilla. He did not sav 
there was any direct relationship, but he was 
directing attention to the physiological resem- 



blance. There were the same differences between 
the modern man and the Neanderthal man as 
between the gorilla and the chimpanzee. 

Pictures of various palates indicated enor- 
mous difference between the chimpanzee palate 
and that of the gorilla. The human palate was 
the same width, but much shorter. Dealing with 
the powers of mastication, the lecturer pointed 
out that the canine teeth are long in the gorilla. 
In the chimpanzee they were not so> long. The lec- 
turer drew attention to the difference in the shape 
of the teeth and of their cusps. In the gorilla they 
were prismatic; in the chimpanzee rounded with 
a tendency to go out in a feathery pattern. In 
the human type the cusps were rounded. 

The lecturer produced the skull of a boy. One 
side of the face had grown at a great 
rate, the muscles of mastication on the same 
side were over-grown. The other side had 
grown at the normal rate. The teeth in the adnor- 
mal side had outgrown the normal side. The 
teeth were formed three months before birth. 
Here was Nature doing an experiment. She was 
producing gorilla teeth on one side and the teeth 
of the chimpanzee on the other. If we knew how 
that was done we should have a solution of the 
problem between the gorilla teeth and the chim- 
panzee. Biologists had a great deal to learn from 
those experiments. They had no idea how the 
differences on the two sides in the boy's skull 
were produced. 

A diagram of a baby gorilla skull inside an 
adult skull was shown to illustrate the great trans- 
formation that took place during growth. These 
changes were all correlated with mastication, and 
they took place between the third and the thir- 
teenth year. The gorilla's skull had a great crest; 
the chimpanzee had not. In the chimpanzee the 
muscle of mastication stopped short of forming 
a great crest like that on a fireman's helmet. 
The point that interested the lecturer was that 
the chimpanzee represented an arrested stage in 
the gorilla. It gave a clue as to how evolution 
might work. He did not think the difference 
between the skull of that gorilla and that chim- 
panzee was essentially greater than between the 
Neanderthal man and modern man. 

Dealing with the growth of the face, the 
lecturer pointed out that the gorilla's face was 
longer than the chimpanzee's. Man had a shorter 
face than the chimpanzee. The greatest differ- 
ence between the chimpanzee and the gorilla lav 
in the apparatus of mastication, the size of the 
muscles of mastication, and the teeth. Smaller 
points were very difficult to define. In the skull 
of the chimpanzee the nasal bones were small. In 
the gorilla they were wide and went below the 
margin of the orbit. There was the same differ- 
ence between Neanderthal man and modern man. 
(To be continued.) 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



GENERAL NOTES. 



That I herewith tender my thanks to Professor 
Arthur Keith, M.D., LL.D 1 ., for permission to 
publish a lecture delivered at the Royal 
College of Surgeons, Lincoln'si Inn Fields : 
"A Study in the Evolution of the Gorilla 
and Chimpanzee, and its bearing on thei 
Evolution of Man"; also to Mr. Robt. Cushman 
Murphy, Central Museum, New York, for per- 
mission to quote from his very interesting bul- 
letin on "The Penguins of South Georgia"; to 
Mr. Walter Winans and Monsieur Pichot for 
their well-informed articles. 



That many articles are crowded out of this num- 
ber, all of which will appear in due course. 



That Keeper Pinder, who was wounded so badly 
that he has been discharged from the Army, 
is now back at the Zoo doing light work. Forty 
keepers are serving in the Forces. 



That the celebrated Pleasure Fair will not be 
held at Hull this year. There has always been 
a vast aggregation of menageries and shows at 
this old-time Fair, constituting one of the 
sights of the Show World. 



That there has been large arrivals of Peach-faced 
Love-birds lately. They can now be obtained 
at very reasonable prices. 



That a very rare specimen of the Hawk-headed 
Parrot arrived in Liverpool, and was acquired 
by a local dealer. 



That large numbers of Amazons and Conures 
are arriving in Liverpool commanding a ready 
sale. 



That the arrivals of Chimpanzees and African 
Monkeys are few and far between. They now 
fetch high prices. 



That six Rhesus Monkeys arrived in the Port of 
London during the last six weeks. Indian Mon- 
keys are exceedingly scarce. 



That the s.s. "Huntsman," from Calcutta, ar- 
rived on October 1st. One Entellus Monkey, 
consigned to W. J. Henning, and the following 
birds to Lady Rothschild and Mr. Ezra : 14 
variousi Darjeeling Sun-birds, 4 ordinary Sun- 
birds, 1 Ring-neck Parrakeet, 21 Sibras, 1 un- 
known Pigeon, 2 Fly Catchers, with others. 



That a valuable consignment of rare South Ameri- 
can birds arrived on s.s. "Samplan," via New 
York, and were deposited at the Zoo. 



That the s.s. "Llandovery Castle" arrived from 
Cape Town on Saturday, 9th inst., with 1 pair 
Blessboks, 4 Meercats, 1 Cape Crane, 2 Cara- 
cals, 3 Porcupines, 2 Rock Rabbits, 1 Spotted 
Cat, and several Baboons. 



That 100 pairs of Senegal mixed birds, with 
few Jerboas arrived via Paris. 



That very few Roller Canaries are arriving from 
Rotterdam. The supply seems likely to be ex- 
hausted by the end of this year. 



That the Zoological Gardens, Regents Park, 
have received some Siamese Fig-htino- Fish. 



That at the Zoo the other day I was struck with 
the great care that is being taken of the regi- 
mental pets housed there during the war. The 
Canadians have left four bears which were all 
captured as cubs in Canada, and among other 
regimental pets the Zoo is glad to have acquired 
even temporarily are four black bucks, or Indian 
antelopes, belonging to the Royal Warwick- 
shire Regiment. 



That one of the probable results of this unexam- 
pled war is the disappearance from the surface 
of the earth of one of the most interesting 
species we possess. In the Lithuanian forests 
there existed before the war a few carefully- 
protected herds of the European bison, the last 
survivors of those which, in prehistoric times, 
wandered in immense numbers over all Europe. 
They have been steadily disappearing before 
the advance of the human population, and if 
the Russian authorities had not taken measures 
to preserve them they would probably have been 
extinct ere now. These huge creatures are 
plainly near relations of the American bison, 
also threatened with extinction, and the resem- 
blance between the two species is very striking. 
It is quite likely that the few specimens pos- 
sessed by our own Zoo will be the last that 
human eyes will look upon, for the fiercest of 
the Eastern fighting has taken place in the 
habitat of these animals. A bison has a poor 
chance when placed between two contending 
modern armies, and we have very little doubt 
that the herds have already been slaughtered. 
Unless a few have by some miracle escaped no 
one will ever see a wild European bison again. 



Printed by W. J. Hasted & Son, (T.U.), 30S, Mile End Road, London, E. 



Telegrams : Hamlyn, London Docks, London, 



Telephone : 6341 Avenue 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East. 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station. 

Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence five minutes walk. 
P.O.O. payable at Leman Street, East. Cheques crossed " London County & Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Can-celled. 



TERMS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from time of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back. TELEPHONE.— Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS.— Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIVERY. — Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

The arrivals from abroad during the past month have been very small. Particulars are given in " General Notes." 
Several dealers are making collections in different parts of the World. One is on the West Coast of Africa ; another is in Australia. 
There are a few animals on the way from South Africa. 



Direct from South Africa :— 

1 pair adult Blessboks (Damaliscus albifrons), in 

sound, healthy condition, first direct importa- 
tion for years. Very low price 

2 Cape Hyrax, Rock Rabbits (Hyrax capensis) ... 

2 Cape Meercats (Suricata tetradactyle) 

1 Cape Crested Porcupine, adult (Hystrix cristata) 

3 Cape Chacma Baboons (Cynocephalus porcarius) 
1 Cape Crown Crane (Balearica pavonia), splendid 

specimen ... 



£50 
£5 
£5 
£7 

£10 

£12 



each 50/- 



lotfor 100/- 

lot for 80/- 

each 7/6 

.. 7/6 



1 Feline Douroucouli, Brazil (Nyctipithecus voci 

ferans) ... 

2 Indian Rhesus 

1 Sooty Mangabey (Cercocebus fuliginosus) 

2 American Raccoons (Procyon lotor), adult 

2 Foxes, adult. 1 Cub 

Australian Dingoes, dog, bitch and pup... 
Chameleons, arriving direct from Morocco 
Jerbous, ,, ,, ,, Egypt 

These are harmless, interesting pets. 
Guinea Pigs ... ... ... 1/6 to 2/- each, 50 for 60/- 

15 Canadian Black White Skunks (Mephitis 

mephitica) ... ... ... ... each 80/6 

These take the place of the Indian Mongoose for rats and 
all vermin. They are entirely devoid of any objectionable 
smell, the scent bacs being abstracted. The only Skunks at 
present for sale in Great Britain, and will not be sold less 
than 80/6 each. 

The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at The Zoologi- 
cal Society's Gardens, Regents Park, London :— 
4 Heloderma suspectum ... ... ... each 

3 Stink pot Terrapins ... ... ... ... ,, 

1 Texas Terrapin 

2 American Green Tree Frogs ... ... ... ,, 

1 ,, Alligator, 3j feet ... 

King Snakes ... ... ... ,, 

Mocassin Snakes ... ... ... ,, 

Chicken Snake 
Hognosed Snake ... 



40/6 
12/6 
12/6 
5/6 
70/6 
25/6 



1 Indian Python 



25/6 
25/6 
80/6 



North American Grey Squirrels (Sciurus cinereus. A few of 
these interesting pets expected. Prices on application. 

ROLLER CANARIE8, Season commencing. 
Cocks, I. class ... ... ... 7/6 each, 7 for 42/6 

III. class ... ... ... 6/6 ,, 7 „ 35/6 

Hens, two beautiful birds, in wicker cage, 3/- ; 14, in 7 cages, 18/- 
10/6 



1 large Blackbacked Gull 
Cormorants, feed from hand 
Herons, fine condition ... 

2 pairs Cbiloewigeon ... 



each 12/6 

12/6 

pair 50/6 



pair 



hens 12/6 
16/6 



25/- 



2 pairs Redcrested Pochards 

1 ,, Gadwall 

3 ,, Carolinas 

2 Hen Blackwinged Japanese Peafowl 
7 White Swans, females 
6 Jungle Fowls cocks 10/6 

4 Silver Pheasants ,. 12/6 
6 Golden ,, ,,16/6 
2 Amherst ., ,, 20/6 
6 Swinhoe ,, ,, 30/6 ,, 40/6 

4 Reeves „ „ 25/6 „ 30/6 
2 Impeyan Pheasants, last year's birds, sup- 
posed females, very fine condition 

2 Indian Sarus Cranes (Grus antigone), adults ... 

1 Rhea, adult, very fine 

2 pairs African Triangular Spotted Pigeons 
60 Budgerigars, adults, very fine for breeding 

Hens, 4/- ; Cocks, 2/6 each, pair 5/6 
Grey Parrot, quite tame, splendid talker 

,, ordinary 

3 Indian green Parrakeets ... ... ... each 

2 Alario Finches 

1 Indian Mud Mynah, tame 

2 Himalayan Tits, seldom imported ... ... each 

1 Golden Oriole, hen 

1 Sallees Amazon 

1 Blue and Buff Macaw, talking, with good 

serviceable stand ... ... ... ... for £6 

1 Red Blue Macaw, very fine ... ... ... ,, £4 

3 Orange-flanked Parrakeets, all tame, perch on 

finger, great pets ... ... ... ... each 

1 Grey cheeked Conure, actually talking 
1 Blueheaded Conure, very fine 
1 Half Moon Conure, tame 

5 Indian Purple Sun Birds ... Cocks, 60/6; Hens 



50/6 
25/6 
25/6 
each 40/6 
males 20/- 
pair 20/6 
„ 25/6 
„ 30/6 
„ 40/6 
,, 65/6 
,, 50/6 

each £7 10/- 

each £10 

£10 

pair 40/6 

10 pairs 45/6 
£10 
£7 
£3 
10/6 
10/6 
15/6 
25/6 
25/6 



40/6 
40/6 
30/6 
15/6 
60/6 



pair 
for 



15/6 

55/6 
£3 



LATE ARRIVALS. 
8 Hardwickes Mastigure (Uromastix hardwickii) each 10/6 

10 pairs longtailed Paradise Whydahs, very fine 

color and condition 
1 pair Peachfaced Lovebirds 
1 tame Capachin Monkey 
14 Indian Mongooses, fine specimens, celebrated 

for rats and all vermin 
Some 20 Monkeys in stock, ranging from 50/- to £10 each. 

Particulars on application. 

1 Vulturine Guinea Fowl, tame 

2 Laughing Jackasses, tame ... ... ... each 

2 Germaines Peacock Pheasants ... ... ,, 60/6 

1 Coreopsis Goose ... ... ... ... 50/6 

1 pair tame bred Gadwall ... ... ... 25/6 

1 Australian Opossum ... ... ... 25/6 

1 Cape Spotted Cat, rare ... ... ... 60/6 



each 25/6 



50/6 
80/6 



WILLSON'S LIVE STOCK PROVIDERS, Ltd., 

37, New Oxford Street, London, W.C. 

Telephone— Gerrard, 7708. Telegrams— Highbred Westcent, London. Bankers— London County & Westminster. 



LONDON'S CHIEF EMPORIUM FOR DOGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



pur adult dogs are sold on 14 days' trial on condition that if not liked they will be 
exchanged for livestock to value from our stock within this period. 

All our Dogs are daily inspected by a Qualified Veterinary Surgeon. 



.A. "VISIT IS BBSPECTFULLY I^JBG^TJESTEID. 

E. W. LITTLE, Rz.s., 

ractical Naturalist and Taxidermist. 

SPECIALIST IN BIG GAME TROPHIES 
AND FISH MOUNTING.— 

Studios: 65, YORK STREET, BAKER STREET, W. 

PADDINGTON 6903. 



THIS SPACE TO LET. 






^ 



>©c 



^ 






Hamlyns 
Menagerie 



Magazine. 



No. 7.- Vol. 1. 



NOVEMBER, 1915. 



Price Sixpence. 






CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTORY 

ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND 

NOTE ON THE PRESENT STATE OF THE LIVE FOREIGN ANIMAL MAR- 
KET IN EUROPE 

THE THEORY OF EVOLUTION 

AN OFFICIAL TIGER-SLAYER 

SHOOTING HIPPOPOTAMUS WITH SHOTGUN 

BRIGHT PROSPECTS FOR CANARY BREEDERS 

GENERAL NOTES 



& 



^Oc 



4 



I am giving up my unique collection 
of Birds. 

Most of them are true pairs. Many have rearet 
young. Most of them have nested. In some cases 
1 cannot absolutely guarantee the sexes. All ar< 



in laultless condition, unless cthei 

>roughly acclimatised. Many 

. cannot be sent on approval. 

pence will be given to these 

iposit. Offers will be considei 

£ I cannot undertake a lengthy 



rise stated, and 
re aviary bred, 
and in all cases 
ho send money 
d if reasonable, 
espondence. 



I. o 



4 


4 





3- 








1 


7 


6 


1 


2 


6 


2l 


2, 





2i 


5 






PARRAKEETS, ETC. 

£ s. d. 
lir Red-collared Lorikeets ... ... 5 5 

Red-faced Lovebirds, best ever 
seen ... ... ... ... ... 2 15 

)ck ditto 1 0' 

Plumheads (cock with defective 

eye) 4 

:k, in perfect health ... 2i 0' 

lir Ringnecks (Indian) ... ... 1 

;k Malabar, a gem ol the first water 5 5 
lir Pennants ... ... ... ... 4 15 0* 

;k Moustache 15 

le pair Speckled Cbnures (C. Euops) 3 3 

ialy Rosella 2 17 6 

Canary-wing, mated to cock All- 
green ... ... ... ... 1 10 

Rosy-faced Lovebirds, reared 

young 4 10 

Rosellas, prolific breeders, have 
reared 7 or 8 for years 

ir 3 young 

Catcus Conures ... 
lir young ditto 
lir Black-cheeked Lovebirds 

3 young 
>air Blue-winged Lovebirds, free 

breeders 1 12 6 

Green Budgies, 4/- pair; 2 pairs 7/6; 3 

pairs 10 

low Budgies, 5/- pair; 2! pairs 9/-; 3 
pairs ... 
iagascar Lovebirds, a pair ... 

Cockatiels, a pair 

Reduction on a quantity. 
Hen Half-moon Conure, mated to cock 

Catcus Conure ... ... ... 1 7 6 

SOFTBILLS, ETC. 
True pair Golden-fronted Fruitsuckers, 

very tame 5 5 

Zosterops Virens, parents 2, 12 6 

Young ditto, each 1 

Purple Sugar Birds, hen 1st L. and 

P.O.S., cock 1 toe missing, a pair 5 10 
Cock Yellow-winged ditto, but abso- 
lutely perfect 2i 5 

Silver-blue Tanager 1 2l 6 

Scarlet Tanagers, pair 3 3 

Hen Spot-billed Toucanette, in cold 

aviary still 1 15 

Pair White-winged Starlings, cock per- 
fect, hen's primaries awry ... 1 10 
Bearded Reedlings, in faultless condi- 
tion, a pair" 1 2 6 

Nightingales, cock finger tame, follows 

like a dog, a pair ... ... ... 117 6 



11 


6 


7 


6 


15 






I been in aviary 

since Spring, a pair 

HARDBILLS, ETC. 
Melbas, a perfect pair, have nested ... 
Black-faced Quail Finches, a pair 
Hen Common ditto 
'2 pairs Hooded Siskins, one cock with 

short primaries, otherwise a gem, 

a pair £4 10s. and ... 
2l pairs Parrot Finches, a pair ... 
Diamond Doves, prolific breeders 

ir Marios 
Odd hen, one foot missing 
1 cock Violet-eared Waxbill ... 
1 hen Dufresnes ... 
1 cock Aurora 

1 cock Sydnev Waxbill ... 
Long-tailed Grassfinches, pair ... 
Masked ditto 

2 Hybrid Masked x Long-tailed 
1 cock White-throated Finch ... 
1 cock Mexican Collared Finch 
1 pair May's Buntings ... 
1 cock ditto 
1 pair Bib Finches 
Zebra Finches, a pair ... 
1 pair Masked Doves, in wonderful con- 
dition 

Yellow Sparrows, a pair... 

Young birds, sex not guaranteed, each 

Fire Finches, a pair 

Bar-breated ditto, a pair 

Gouldian Finches, pair of Blackheads 

Cock Red-headed ditto ... 

Cock Black-headed ditto 

These four birds have been in my 
aviary for 2 years. 
Jackson's Whydahs, true pair, have 

nested 
Cock Paradise ditto, in full colour 
Gneen Cardinals, prolific breeders 
Taba, Napoleon, and Hybrid Weavers, 

out of colour, 3/6 each; per dozen 
Orange Bishops, one cock and several 

hens, out of colour, each ... 
Black-cheeked Waxbills, 2 cocks and 

hen. 
Gixen Avadavats, a perfect pair 
Lavender Finches, pair ... 
Odd cock ... 

Diamond Sparrows, a pair 
Orange-breasted Waxbills, one extra- 
ordinarily brilliant pair 

An ordinary pair ... 
Orange-cheeked Waxbills, pair 
Pink-cheeked Waxbills, pair 
Pink-cheeked, mated to Orange-cheeked 

these nested and laid fertile eggs 
Blue-breasted Waxbills, a pair ... 
White-headed Mannikins, guaranteed 

true pair, 'nave nested 
Chestnut-breasted Mannikins, sex not 

guaranteed, pair 

Java Sparrows, Grey cock White hen 
Ruficaudas, 2 pair, a pair ... ... 1 5 

Grey Singing Finches, a pair ... ... 7 

Green Singing Finches, a pair 10/6 and 8 

DR. KEAYS, EAST H0ATHLY, SUSSEX 



15 



12 



1 10 



1 5 



12 6 



Hamlims Jttmajjerie JEaga^ittt 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 7.— Vol. 



LONDON, NOVEMBER, 1915. 



PRICE SIXPENCE. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

List of Subscribers, 
September 15th to October 15th, 1915. 

K. V. Painter, 32;40 Fairmount Boulevard, Cleve- 
land Heights, Ohio, U.S.A. 

Professor Arthur Keith, Royal College of Sur- 
geons, Lincolns Inn Fields, W.C. 

Superintendent, Zoological Gardens, Alipur, Cal- 
cutta, India. 

Mrs. L. Fielder, 6, Raleigh Gardens, Brixton 
Hill. 

Dr. Van Ookt, Museum, Leider, Holland. 

Miss Owen Williams, 11, Cambridge Road, Lee, 
S.E. 

Wii.r.sox's, 37, Now Oxford Street, W.C. 

Sixty bona tide Subscribers in six months — 
May to October — is certainly something to bo 
proud of, considering the Magazine was launched 
at the very worst possible time. 

I have no Advisory Committee or Honorary 
Members to advocate the cause of the Magazine. 
It is an interesting Magazine which will supply a 
long-felt want amongst all lovers of the Animal 
and Bird creation. 

Articles are on hand and are promised by the 
Leading Collectors and Dealers of the world. I 
am u<ll aware the success of the Magazine has 
grievously disappointed many who should have 
been the 'first to lend a helping hand to a most 
laudable undertaking. Letters of encouragement 
aii received weekly from all parts of the globe. 

One serious mistake was made when the sub- 
scription was reduced from 10/- to 6/- per annum. 
In view of the increased cost of postage, the sub- 
scription will revert to it s. original figure — 10/^ — at 
the rommenccment of the Second Volume, five 
months hence. Only single copies can be supplied 
at 6d. per copy. All subscriptions sent in during 
the next live months will commence from No. 1. 
About 140 new subscribers are required to place 
the Magazine on a paying basis. I led confident 
I shall secure them. 

The subscription for No. 1 to 12 is 6/- per 
annum, post free, under cover. The monthly dis- 



tribution to all parts of the world amounts to some 
1,2.00 copies; this is with a view to obtain new 
Subscribers. 

Advertisements are inserted at very reason- 
able rates. 

If you have not already sent in your &/- sub- 
scription, might I respectfully ask you to do so? 

JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



The following Articles will appear from time to 
time as opportunity occurs : — 

"How I became a Naturalist." 

"Why I went to the Congo." 

"My Second Visit to the Congo." 

''Gorilla Dealing — Alive and Dead." 

"A true acount of the origination of the Wild 
Beast Business in Great Britain." 

"The Peculiarities of this Unique Business." 

"My Visit to South Africa." 

"The Advent of the Boxing Kangaroo and the 
Wrestling Lion. " 

"Concerning 'Peter,' one of the most famous 
Chimpanzees of the Age; also on the train- 
ing of Chimpanzees in general." 

"The Expedition to Dyers Islands, Cape of 
Good Hope, resulting in the capture of 125 
Penguins and 12 1 Cape Sea Lions." 

"Ivory Buying in the French Congo." 

" How I attempted to corner the Monkey Mar- 
ket thirty years ago, and lamentably failed." 

"An impression of the Zoological Gardens at 
Regents Park, Dublin, Bristol, Edinburgh, 
Halifax and Manchester." 



ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF 
IRELAND. 

The Council mci on the (iili November — Dr. 
()'( arroll, Vice-President, in the chair. Also 
present: — The Secretar) (Professor (i. II. Car- 
penter), the Treasurer (\h-. CosgTave), \V. E. 

Peebles, Dr. Cordon, Dr. R. E. Scharll, Dr. A. 
Ball, Professor A. !• . l)i\on, James Inglis, C. |. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



MacCarthy, Professor Mettam, Professor Scott, 
L. E. Steele, H. F. Stephens, and Sir R. H. 
Woods. 

The following gifts were reported : — Vege- 
tables from Mr. Gibson Black, and horses for the 
carnivora from Messrs. A. W. Thwaiteis, Mrs. 
Malone, and Messrs,. Walter Brown. Colonel 
Daniel, Commandant's House, Arbour Hill, and 
Major Tamworth were entered as Garden Sub- 
scribers. Visitors to the Gardens for the week, 
1,071. 

This being the first Saturday in November, 
the judging for the photographic medal offered 
by the Society for the best set of four pictures of 
animals taken in the Zoological Gardens by ama- 
teurs took place. A large number of exhibits were 
forwarded to the Committee, all of them possess- 
ing merit of varying degree. The set awarded the 
silver medal in the class open to> all amateurs, ir- 
respective of age, was sent in by "Semper" (Mr. 
Arthur MacCullum). Another excellent exhibit 
came very close, and it is hoped the competitor 
will succeed on some other occasion in carrying off 
the medal. In the junior class, which is limited 
to competitors under 18 years (the age of competi- 
tors being considered), the excellence of the ex- 
hibits deserved much praise. Miss Muriel H. A. 
Goodman (aged 14) is awarded a silver medal in 
the junior class, her pictures showing special merit, 
and the bronze medal falls to Master Jim FitzGib- 
bon (aged 10 years and G months). The prize pic- 
tures will be on view during the next few weeks in 
the lion house. A lecture will be given on Thurs- 
day, 2,5th November, under the Society's auspices, 
bv'Mr. W. S. Green, C.B. 



Note on the present state of the Live 
Foreign Animal Market in Europe. 

By G. DE Southoff. 
(Translated from the Bulletin of the French National 
Acclimatization Society, July, 1915, by F. Finn.) 
(Continued from page 4, No. G.) 
The Mammals imported present a great diver- 
sity of form and size; from little Rodents of the 
size of a Mouse to Elephants. The laws restrict- 
ing their export which are in force in certain 
colonies, laws which one can but approve, never- 
theless, since their object is the protection of rare 
species, hinder some importations, which are only 
allowed by exceptional permission for zoological 
gardens. The delicacy of certain animals is a 
serious obstacle to their introduction to the Euro- 
pean markets; thus, for instance, some Edentates 
and Insectivores and many American Monkevs are 
rarely offered for sale. 



Setting aside the animals whose size puts 
them out of the question for most amateurs and 
many naturalists, we will only deal with others. 
We may mention as we go along, among those 
which are not as well known and appreciated as 
they might be either as curiosities or scientifically, 
many small Carnivores : — Wild Cats such as Felis 
mitis, Felis geoffrozi; Caracals (Felis Caracal); 
Coatis (Nasua); Genets (Genetta); Marsupials — 
Phalangers (Trichosurus) and Kangaroos (Macro- 
pus); a number of Monkeys, from the common 
Macaques and Bonnets (M. cynomolgus and sini- 
cus) to the elegant Mangabeys (Cercocebus) and 
Guenous (Cercopithecus), and to the American 
kinds of which only three or four, the Capuelions 
(Cebus), Spider-Monkeys (Ateles) and of the 
Aarious Marmosets (Hapale, Fidas) make their 
appearance in our ports, but which are among the 
commonest in the Liverpool and London markets. 

Then, too, it is our English friends who im- 
port the most Ungulates, Ruminants, Carnivores, 
Monkeys, Lemurs, Marsupials, Rodents, and even 
Bats are to be found in good numbers, every year, 
with their dealers. Certain fresh species have re- 
placed those which for some reason or another 
have become rare. Arrivals are becoming more 
and more regular. The huge colonial empire of 
England alone furnishes the majority of these ani- 
mals. The numerous and interesting' species 
peculiar to Australia arrive in great quantities and 
are sold at very reasonable prices. The Monkey 
market is also well supplied and it) is only in Eng- 
land that one can get some American Monkeys 
and the rare Guenous of tropical and insular 
Africa. The anthropoid Apes are of common oc- 
currence in the hands of the English dealers, 
commoner than anywhere else, except perhaps 
as reg'ards the Orang-utons and Gibbons which 
the Dutch import from their possessions in the 
Dutch Indies, with some other species from their 
colonies. The animals of Central Asia and Siberia 
are rarer. They used generally to be common with 
the Austrian and German dealers of Trieste and 
Hamburg-. On the other hand, the Asiatic and 
African Ruminants, Antelopes, Gazelles, Goats, 
and Wild Sheep are common in the English mar- 
kets, as are also' the Mammals of North America. 

In France, Mammals are only imported very 
irregularly and in small numbers, with the excep- 
tion of some Monkeys, Armadillos (Dasypus), 
Squirrels, and other small and common enough 
animals. It is to be regretted that the animals of 
the French Colonies are not imported or were so 
by German dealers ! Here is a source of profit 
for our fellow-countrymen which we should do ill 
to neglect any longer. 

In Belgium, animals used to be imported at 
Antwerp, but generally only in course of transit 
to Germany. The Zoological Garden of that city 
used to hold an annual sale of foreign animals 
which was much patronised. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



In Italy, as in Spain, all. that the dealers buy 
are occasional Monkeys and other animals which 
sailors bring home from their voyages. Some 
English merchants receive their stock at Genoa 
and, after a short rest convey it thence to 
England. 

I may mention, as a curiosity, the Monkey 
market at Constantinople which supplies the 
Baboons often to be found in Turkish harems, 
where their grimaces amuse the most recently 
disenchanted inmates. It is at Constantinople, 
too, that Tziganes and Romanichels buy their 
Baboons, just as the little Italians of the Paris 
streets — some thirty years ago — used to buy 
their 's at Parma. Nearly all the Romanichels' 
' Bears are Syrian ears (Ursus arctos syriacus), 
gentler than European ones, and bought at 
Trieste where they are imported from Asia Minor. 

Of all foreign animals, Birds are those which 
arrive most regularly in large numbers in France. 
Not only small Passerines, but a good number of 
Waterfowl, Climbers, Pigeons, Game-birds, and 
even Birds-of-prey and Struthious birds are an- 
nually offered for sale in the various ports on the 
Atlantic and the Mediterranean. Among the 
lovers of living creatures, it is especially those 
who are interested in Ornithology who are numer- 
ous in France, and more than one of our colleagues 
have collections of Birds which are, from every 
point of view, remarkable. The Birds which the 
great liners bring us every spring in very impor- 
tant numbers, bear in all countries the name of 
"Collections from Senegal," for they generally 
consist of African birds, put on board at an African 
port, just as the consignments of South American 
birds — now-a-days, alas ! rare — -were styled in the 
time of Madame de Pompadour, "Collections from 
Brazil," or "Collections of Birds from the Isles." 
The Birds of Java, Indo-China, and India, are also 
commonly offered. Some years ago, also, many 
Australian birds, especially some Grassfinches 
(Poephila) used often to arrive at Marseilles, but 
they are becoming less and less common, like the 
little Red-faced Love-birds (Agapornis pullaria) 
called also Guinea Sparrows by French bird- 
dealers, which arc hardly now imported except in 
England. 

The Italian, Spanish and Portuguese dealers 
only receive directly some "Collections from Sene- 
gal," consisting of well-known birds of small 
value. 

We arc, then, indebted to England for all, 
or nearly all, the rare birds. Several fresh species 
Irom Northern India have made their appearance, 
these last few years, in this market. Nearly all 
Parrots and Parrakects are similarly imported 
into the British Isles. Cockatoos, short-tailed 
Parrots, some Macaws, the small American Par- 
rakeets of the Genera Brotogerys and Conurus, 
and the Palaeornis Parrakeets figure amongst tin- 
most abundant. Macaws, however, arrive less 
frequently than heretofore, and some of them (Ara 



leari, A. maracena, Cyonopsittacus spixi) are not 
to be had at all. Among- the typical Parrots, we 
may note the African Greys (P. erithacus), im- 
ported in great numbers, to be decimated by 
septic fever during the first months of their stay 
in England. They are hardly imported into France 
any more, especially those with light grey plum- 
age, which come from the south coast of West 
Equatorial Africa and are known by the trade 
name of "South Coast Birds," are credited with 
superior talent. Some Australian Parrakeets of 
the genus Platy cereus are not so common in the 
market as formerly. A good number of Scandi- 
navian, North Russian and Siberian birds are im- 
ported into England, of which some are only 
larger and brighter-coloured northern forms of 
our native birds (Bull-finches, Gold-finches, Sis- 
kins, Red-poles), and others belong to those 
regions : Rose-finch (Carpodaeus erythronusj, 
Waxwings (Ampelis garrulus), and some others. 
Unfortunately it was through German agents that 
these importations took place, and this will have 
to be avoided in future. 

The trade in Aquarium Fish is fairly wide- 
spread in England, though nevertheless very much 
less than it is in our enemies' countries. As to 
Insects, in England as in France, there is no 
trade done in importing them; the same thing can 
be said of the other Invertebrates, though in Ham- 
burg, Vienna, etc., as we have said, both had 
their department. 

Except for some species which English dealers 
import freely enough, the trade in Reptiles and 
Batrachians is insignificant. It is true that they 
find few purchasers, though they arc easy enough 
to keep in captivity, and certainly more interest- 
ing than many others. This fact" is perhaps best 
explained by the instinctive repulsion people 
generally feel for them. 

U e had no intention, in making these nok's, 
of entering into statistical particulars or of citing 
species. People interested in this question will 
find reliable assistance with the French National 
Society of Acclimatization, which will have plea- 
sure in supplying all complementary details. Our 
wish has been to give a clearer notion of the 
present conditions of this market, in order that 
the importers of the Allied Countries ma\ con- 
sider how best to compete with their enemies in 
this field. It ought to be easy for them to gel the 
animals of their colonies, which is as good as 
saying those of hall the entire tropical world. 

Outside Europe, the two Americas would give 
them a numerous and valuable body of patrons. 
A more intimate business association between the 
English and French dealers would also be desira- 
ble; they could render each other effective assi-a- 
ance, .\u(\ therein do appreciable service to accli- 

matizers and scientists, contributing at the same 
time to. the general well-being and prosperity oi 
their icspective countries. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



The thanks of the readers of this Magazine 
must be given to the talented writer of one of the 
most interesting Articles which have so> far ap- 
peared. Monsieur G. de Southoff hasi forgotten 
to state that the origination of the Wild Animal 
and Bird Business took place in London some sixty 
or seventy years ago. It was founded by the late 
world-renowned Naturalist, Charles Jamrach, of 
St. George's Street East, London Docks. I might 
say in passing that the Bird Business is still car- 
ried on by his son and successor, A. E. Jamrach. 
London, in those days, was the sole emporium for 
this trade in the whole of the civilised world. To 
Jamrach's came every Continental Dealer. The 
shipping- of the world was then centred in the 
London Docks. The Greek and Italian adven- 
turers, who hunted and collected in the Soudan and 
Abyssinia, all brought their collections to London. 

It was nothing unusual to find on a steamer 
from the East, Giraffes, Elephants, Hippos, with 
Gelada Monkeys. 

The Australian wool ships on their part would 
bring 5,000 to 10,000 Budgerigars, with hundreds 
of Parrakeets; these would consist of Paradises, 
Turquosines, Swifts, Elegants, all brought by the 
score on certain well-known sailing ships. 

I well remember the "La Hoque," a famous 
ship, bringing 20 Turquoisines, 20 Paradises, 20 
Splendids, 20 Bourkes, 20 Blue Bonnets, Beauti- 
fuls, Many Colors, Bloodrumps, and others galore. 

The sail-maker and carpenter made a speciali- 
ty of Australian Parrakeets, and without fear of 
contradiction I state that these two men brought 
more of the rarer Parakeets to London than all 
the other traders together. I remember the num- 
bers so well for they were always brought in their 
peculiar shaped sized boxes, each to hold only 
twenty Parrakeets. We had a trader from New- 
Zealand whose collection always included New 
Zealand Parrakeets, Golden-headed and Alpine 
Parrakeets, Bell Birds, Tuis, Kias, Avith King 
Penguins, Blue Penguins and Yellow-crowned Pen- 
guins. This trader also brought from two to six 
Maori Heads — some were dried, some were in 
pickle. I believe, however, the authorities stopped 
their exportation directly they became aware of 
the trade in these great curiosities. 

The trade in African small birds — Seneg'als — 
has always been centred in Bordeaux and Mar- 
seilles, it was nothing unusual for 10i,00O mixed 
African Birds to arrive in Bordeaux on one 

steamer. 

The large Animal Trade has certainly been 
centred in Germany. Whether it will remain so 
time will prove. 

With regards to the South American trade, 
that was somewhat limited about the time I now 
write of. We had an American trader who yearly 
paid two visits. His collection would be 200 Cuban 



Parrots, 100' Blue Robins, several hundred Non- 
pariels and Indigoes, with Mocking- Birds and 
Red-shouldered Starlings. It will also surprise my 
readers to know that he brought several pairs of 
Carolina Parrakeets on one occasion, interesting 
as being the most northerly ranging of all parrots, 
and now, unfortunately, very nearly extinct. It 
seems, however, that it was reported a few years 
ago that an American Museum had "fortunately" 
secured two hundred specimens. I mention this 
because we traders are always accused of exter- 
minating species, whereas the saddle should really 
be laid on the back of the clear-souled scientist. 

I now come to the statement concerning the 
importation of Canaries. The writer states that 
Canaries of the value of 3,000 francs (£120) 
Aveekly are imported. I should like to know from 
whence he obtained those figures. Taking an in- 
terest in these small importations, and from en- 
quiries made, I find the value is not £120' monthly, 
much less weekly. In normal times the importa- 
tions would be of the value of £300 to £500 weekly 
throughout the season. The trade, so far as I 
can discover, is practically non-existent to-day. 

The Monkey Market is principally in English 
hands. This is accounted for by the wonderful 
service of the Elder Dempster Line, with its two 
and three weekly service of steamers from Africa. 
The arrivals from India have been very few during 
the last few years; still there are signs of a revival, 
there being a small consignment of Macaus Rhesus 
due within the next few days. 

I am, however, quite in accord with the sen- 
timents contained in the two last paragraphs — 
that with the English and French Dealers working 
together they would acquire a great control of this 
most interesting business, thereby rendering effec- 
tive service to the people in general and the world 
at large. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



THE THEORY OF EVOLUTION. 

LECTURE AT THE ROYAL COLLEGE 
OF SURGEONS. 

By Professor Arthur Keith, M.D., 
LL.D., F.R.C.S. 



(Continued from page 7, No. 6.) 
A diagram was shown of the side of a gorilla's 
skull, and the lecturer pointed out differences in 
the balooning of the tear duct in the region of the 
nose. The tear ducts were conducted into a bone 
bubble, the meaning of which he did not know. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Hamlntt's jR^nagm* jStaaa^itu. 



Published on the 15th of each month. 



Editorial and Business Office (pro tem) : — 

221, ST. GEORGE'S STREET, LONDON, E. 
Telephone : Avenue 6341. 
Telegrams : " Hamlyn, London Docks, London." 



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The Editor will be glad to receive for publication articles 
and all interesting photos, the imports and exports of all 
stock, and foreign adventures with all wild stock. The 
subscription is 6/- per ann., or 6d. per copy, post free, 
which will be sent under cover. 



Dealing with the air cavities or sinuses of the 
nose, the lecturer stated that in the skull on the 
screen there were five sinuses all told. It was a 
curious thing- that five sinuses occurred only in 
three animals — man, the gorilla, and the chim- 
p.-inzee. It did not occur in a chance way. When 
they observed a combination of circumstances in 
two separate races they must believe there was a 
common origin. 

Another point of resemblance; between the 
chimpanzee, the gorilla, and man, was the arrange- 
ment of the bones in the wrists. The primal 
arrangement was with a big central bone. In 
the gorilla, the chimpanzee and man, the central 
bone had become greatly reduced in size and 
united with another bone. This was probably a 
matter of common inheritance. 

Coming to the feet, the lecturer found the 
same lines on the foot-soles, of a new born 
child and in a newly born gorilla. There 
a distinguishing mark between the chim- 
panzee and the gorilla. The gorilla had 
a big toe which was thick, and the size of the 
heel gave it a great lever for raising - the weight 
of the body. The chimpanzee had a grasping 
organ, which was more of a hand. In the size 
Oi the big toe of the gorilla they had a fore- 
shadowing of the human condition. There could 
be no doubt that one of the differences between 
tin- chimpanzee and the gorilla was in the feet, 
and that the gorilla was .showing some tendency 
towards the human condition. Supposing the 
theory of evolution was true, how could an 

anthropoid or foot become a human 

loot? Most people had the opinion that the 
big toe would be drawn in towards the 
other toes. That was not how the change took 
place. In the early days of the evolution of the 
foot the big toe was the main fulcrum; the other 
toes turned in to meet: it. In the human fool 
signs of that movement could still be detected. 

Dealing with the upright posture, the lecturer 
spoke of the primitive attachment of the soleus 
muscle in the calf of the leg. In all monkevs 
they found only a tibial origin of the soleus mus- 
cle, but the extensive origin from both leg bones 



was peculiar to man in size and shape. They saw- 
in the chimpanzee a certain stage of the muscle 
of soleus in regard to walking-, but they saw it 
more advanced in the gorilla. Worked out in 
figures the percentages were : 16% chimpanzee, 
35% gorilla, and 100%, man. That showed 
how Nature had worked. It was evident, as 
Darwin said, that it came in by variation 
and an increase of that variation. Dealing 
with the adaptations of the human method of walk- 
ing, the lecturer drew special attention to the 
muscle down the front of the body, one part of 
which went ink} the crest of Ilium. This was one 
of the main balancing muscles, and was an adapta- 
tion to the upright posture. The only one animal 
in which they found this as well as man was the 
gorilla. He had shown them that in the form of 
the foot and in the form of the heel, in the adapta- 
tion of the muscles, and now- in this most peculiar 
feature they had foreshadowed in the gorilla cer- 
tain human characteristics. They knew of no 
fossils which took them back to that point where- 
issued from an extinct ape-like form. But there 
were in the world animals nearly associated to 
man in which they could study the problems of 
evolution, and the problems must be very similar 
to those which existed in the days of early man. 
It was true that such anthropoids as had sur- 
vived into modern times could not and did not 
represent human progenitors. But they did 
represent the kind of animal 1 from which we must 
believe the progenitor of mankind sprang. We 
must base our conception of the origin of man 
on a minute study of such anthropoids as still 
survive — to observe in them how forms have 
become differentiated and the direction in which 
differentiation is being carried out. A study of 
the gorilla and of the chimpanzee gives us a' clue 
to at least one factor which is at work — namely 
internal secretion. We know that one small gland 
— the pituitary — does throw substances into the 
blood which exercise a marvellous effect on the 
degree and type of growth. The differences be- 
tween chimpanzees and gorillas are largely 
pituitary effects. 



AN OFFICIAL TIGER-SLAYER/ 

Mr. Digby Davies, a Deputy Inspector- 
General of the Indian Police, served for over 
thirty years in the Bombay Presidency, and din- 
ing that long period had exceptional opportunities 
for indulging his love of sport, espcciallv while 
carrying out the duties of his unique office of 
Tiger-slayer to the Government of Bombay. His 
reputation as a successful hunter of dangerous 
game had led to his appointment for the purpose 
of reducing the number of tigers and leopards, 
whose depredations amongst cattle and destruc- 
tion of human lives had formed the subject of 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



numerous complaints, of which the Government 
were obliged to take serious notice. Thus Mr. 
Davies found himself in the position of all others 
most suited to his tastes, and, being assisted in 
every way by the authorities, had a unique exper- 
ience which probably in no other way could have 
fallen to his lot. Although he kept a journal, in 
which he entered notes of the various wild animals 
killed by him — not only tigers, but leopards, bears, 
hyaenas, wild boar, sambur, axis-deer, and, in 
fact, most, if not all, of the big game to be found 
in the Bombay Presidency — it appears that, being 
less skilful with his pen than with his rifle, he did 
not feel equal to writing a book which would em- 
body his long experiences as a sportsman. Hence' 
we are indebted to his friend, Mr. C. E. Goulds- 
bury, for the volume that is now before us. In 
his capacity as editor, though he styles himself 
author, he tells us that the work has been com- 
piled from notes and stories furnished by Mr. 
Davies, and that he has endeavoured to construct 
an autobiographical narrative that has necessitated 
his writing' throughout in the first person singular. 
This is perhaps as well, for a personal narrative 
always carries greater conviction of the truth of 
the adventures related than if told second-hand by 
one who had no part in them. We have only to 
bear in mind that the author is Mr. Davies and 
not Mr. Gouldsbury. To the latter, however, 
praise is due for the skilful manner in which he 
has utilised the material placed at his disposal. 
To relate another's story, as he himself remarks, 
is naturally more difficult than to tell one's own; 
but in this case Mr. Davies's accounts of his 
adventures are so full, and his descriptions of the 
appearance and habits of the various wild animals 
he encountered are given in such detail that the 
editor's task has been comparatively an easy one. 
The result is a very entertaining book, and open- 
ing it where we will, and in spite of all that has 
been written about Indian game by other sports- 
men, we find Mr. Davies's stories so graphically 
told as to be extremely diverting. 

Although by the terms of his appointment Mr. 
Davies was bound to make tigers and leopards the 
chief object of pursuit (p. 71), he did not of course 
neglect to take chances of slaying other big game 
animals whenever he happened to- come across 
them, or was unexpectedly attacked by them. But 
as to these the subject may be passed lightly over, 
for we may take it that most readers will be more 
concerned to know what was the outcome of ap- 
pointing an official tiger-slayer. The author's 
experiences date back to 1888. In the early part 
of that year he accompanied two- friends on a 
shooting trip to the Central Provinces. In those 
days that part of India had not been much shot 
over, and the party had excellent sport in the 
Chandu district, though, unfortunately, the local 
forest officer was killed by a buffalo. "Of the 
eleven tigers we bagged, says Mr. Davies, "one 
which fell to my rifle measured 10ft. 2in. , the 



record so far as my own shooting is concerned, 
yet strangely enough, it gave me less trouble to 
secure than many considerably smaller ones. . . . 
He was a very old tiger, light in colour, and much 
scarred about the. face, possibly from wounds re- 
ceived in combat with others of his kind or in 
battle with a boar." The aA T erage length of a 
tiger, according to Mr. Davies, is 9ft. 6in., and he 
adds that in measuring a tiger "care should be- 
taken that the measurement is in a straight line 
from nose to tip of tail, and not round the curves 
as measurements are taken in Bengal" (p. 491. 
Writing of sport as it was in India five-arid-twenty 
or thirty years ago, the author says : — 

"I regret now that I did not keep an exact 
record of the number of tigers I have slain. As 
tiger-slayer to the Bombay Government, how- 
ever, I had to submit a weekly return of tigers 
killed, and during my term of office the figure.-, 
so' far as I remember, reached about 200. These 
did not include the number I killed before being- 
appointed to that office, or during- any period 
of leave. I may safely say, therefore, that 
the numbers of tigers I have shot 1 cannot be 
much under 300 in all. 

"My biggest bag for one year in Khandesh 
was thirty-one, and in one week six. At one 
time, indeed, I remember being almost tired 
of shooting- tigers, they were so plentiful, and in 
SO' many cases they were shot without any 
greater effort on my part than holding the rifle 
straight." 

But as he generally shot on foot, although 
sometimes from a tree, or machan, but never from 
the back of an elephant, due credit must be allowed 
for possession of that courage and nerve without 
which, in front of an angry tiger, no rifle can be 
expected to be held very straight. 

It may be well imagined that a man who has 
slain nearly 300 tigers in the course of his life, to 
say nothing- of leopards, bears, buffalo, and other 
dangerous Indian game, must have had an almost 
unique experience of jungle life well worth record- 
ing; and such we think will be the verdict of those 
who peruse his book. 

* Davies.— Tiger-slayer by Order. By Digby Davies. lace 
Bombay Police. Edited by C. E. Gouldsbury, late Indian 
Police. With numerous illustrations. Svo.. pp. _!■ 
London: Chapman and Hall. 



SHOOTING HIPPOPOTAMUS WITH 
SHOTGUN. 

Our contemporary, "The Field," has the fol- 
lowing very interesting letter : — 

Sir, — The following occurrence, which I im- 
agine to be almost unique, may possibly be of 
interest to some of your readers. About ten days 
ago (i.e., in September, 1915) a party of four. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



consisting of Dr. Ellacombe, of the B.S.A. Com- 
pany's Service; Messrs. T. L. Russell and H. C. 
de C. Evans, two well-known traders in Barotse- 
land, and the writer crossed the river from here 
to the recently conquered piece of country which 
was formerly known as the Caprivi Zipfel strip 
of German South-West Africa, and which abuts 
on the Zambesi at this point, with the object of 
indulging in an afternoon's pheasant shooting. 
After going about a mile we approached a lagoon 
of some considerable dimensions, when, to our 
astonishment, we saw a hippo on the far side 
some 30 yards from the water, in itself a sufficient- 
ly unusual spectacle in broad daylight. The wind 
was from the animal to us, but he evidently had 
heard us or suspected our presence, and walked 
slowly into the thick bush instead of plunging 
into the river. Having nothing but shotguns with 
us, it seemed impossible to attempt to do otherwise 
than leave him to his own devices. 

Mr. Evans had, however, learnt a trick from 
rm old hunter in Barotseland of cutting round the 
case of a cartridge just over the big wad which 
separates the shot from the powder, a process 
which he assured us rendered the charge at close 
quarters as effective as a rifle bullet of the heaviest 
calibre. Hastily cutting two No. A. A. A. cart- 
ridges, of which he had had a few with him, he 
made off round the end of the lagoon with the 
object of getting a shot at the hippo, if possible, 
followed somewhat sceptically by the rest of the 
party, who very naturally imagined that even 
if he succeeded in hitting the quarry, the only 
effect would be to alarm and annoy the latter and 
make it seek the shelter of the adjacent water. 
We had not long to wait before we heard two 
shots fired at intervals of about thirty seconds, 
shortly afterwards followed by three more, and, to 
our amazement, the grunting roar of a wounded 
hippo. In some trepidation for our companion's 
safety we hurried forward, and were greeted with 
the spectacle of the hippo in his death struggles, 
with Mr. Evans standing by cutting more cart- 
ridges with the utmost sang-froid in order to put 
the brute out of his pain. It appeared that he had 
crepl up to within about 20 ft. of the hippo before 
firing his firsl shot, which we found on examina- 
tion to have entered the ear to all intents and pur- 
poses like a bullet, as Mr. Evans had assured us 
il would. This shot brought the brute down, but 
it managed to gel to its legs again and stagger 
a tew yards, Mr. Evans following it and adminis- 
tering a second dose in the other ear. This finally 
brought it down, although it made frequent and 
desperate efforts to get to its feet and charge Mr. 
Evans, who eventually killed it with a well-directed 
shot through the heart from a rifle for which Mr. 
Russell had sent a boy back to camp as soon as 
Mr. Evans started on what we could not help re- 
garding as a fruitless and even foolhardy quest,. 
The hippo was a full-grown bull, and the weapon 
used was an ordinary 12-borc shotgun. 



The trick of cutting round a cartridge in the 
manner described may not be generally known, 
and may perhaps be of use to anyone finding him- 
self for any cause forced to depend upon the ser- 
vices of a shotgun when at close quarters with 
big game. Ernest H. Jalland. 

Sesheke, September, 1915. 



The following notice appeared in "Cage 
Birds," 6th Novembmer last: — 

BRIGHT PROSPECTS FOR 
CANARY BREEDERS. 

We wonder if Canary breeders have grasped 
the significance of the advertisements which ap- 
peared in our issue of last week asking for Canar- 
ies in any quantity for export. 

The war has told hardly upon many classes 
of our countrymen, and there can be no doubt 
that among those that have suffered with the 
rest are bird-keepers in general. There is no 
cloud without a silver lining, however, and Canary 
breeders wall certainly have justification for opti- 
mism. An opportunity without precedent is now 
before them. The trade in German-bred Roller 
Canaries is at an end for a long period, if not per- 
manently, notwithstanding the statement in a 
London newspaper that the traffic is still being 
carried on via Holland, and a boundless prospect 
is opened up in connection with the supply of 
English Canaries, Rollers or other, to the 
United States. Wages in America are reckoned 
by the dollar, and in many cases a United States 
citizen, earning, as he does, dollars to the English 
worker's shillings, spends them with about the 
same degree of respect for their value. 

The American demand for English Canaries 
has always been large, and it will now be multi- 
plied in its extent. If our breeders do not rise to 
the occasion they will have only themselves to 
blame. We think there is little fear of such a 
contingency, and we are looking forward with 
lull confidence to a period of prosperity for our 
English breeders who are able to grasp the oppor- 
tunity now being presented to them. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

That several interesting articles are promised lor 
the December number, amongst which will be 
one by Walter Winans, Esq., "European 
Bisons," and one by Mr. Frank Finn on "The 
Incidental and Establishment Charges of the 
various Zoological Gardens." 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



That we have received congratulations on the im- 
provement of this Magazine, more especially the 
October number. 

That we have also received a most interesting let- 
ter from The Director, Zoological Gardens, 
Perth. Mr. Le Souef writes as follows : — 
" Perth, Western Australia. 

20th September, 1915. 

I am sorry that there is no chance of my 
getting the parrots you wish. There are no 
parrakeets excepting yellow cheek rosellas and 
ring neck parrakeets within hundreds of miles 
of Perth. I often think that the people in Eng- 
land have not the slightest idea of the hardships 
and immense distances in uncivilised country 
that the catchers have to go through in order to 
get birds. They have been gradually frozen out 
of the trade by low prices offered in the past, 
and I do not think it likely that young men will 
take on the work to succeed them as the risk 
and poor returns are not enough to make it 
worth while. I have travelled thousands of miles 
lately by motor car in Western Australia and the 
only parrakeets that I have seen are rosellas, 
yellow collarded and Budgerigars. The trappers 
have to go right to the Kimberleys after birds 
and it has always been a marvel to me how they 
have managed to be so successful considering 
the difficulties under which they labour. I find 
it practically impossible to buy the native parra- 
keets for the Zoological Gardens and have a 
very poor collection. After the war I will see if 
it is not possible to procure the birds for export 
but at the present time this is not possible." 

Comment on this interesting information 
must be reservel for the next issue. 

That Mr. Alfred Erza has added two more " Hum- 
mers" to his wonderful collection. 

That a Mr. A. J. Shipton, of Balham, writes : — 
"Are you still publishing your Magazine? 
If so, kindly send one on. I will send you P.O. 
I heard you had given it up." 

If Mr. Shipton will send on the name and 
address of his informant, I will post Mr. Ship- 
ton the Magazine free for twelve months and 
seek a personal interview with this scandal- 
monger. 

That Mr. Charles Judge, the celebrated animal 
trainer, has had the misfortune to lose, both his 
performing Chimpanzees. Our sympathies are 
with him in this matter. 

That our Chimpanzee, "Peter," sailel on Satur- 
day, 13th November, on the s.s. "Norman" to 
join Mr. E. H. Bostock's Volpys Circus in Cape 
Town. We had " Peter" quite a time. He was 
the most wayward Chimpanzee that ever passed 



through our hands. His chief pleasure con- 
sisted in destroying the furniture/ and chasing 
the maid-of-all-work up and down stairs> Still 
we all loved him. May "Peter" and his trainer, 
Mr. Randall, have a pleasant voyage and safe 
journey. 

That Walter Winans, Esq., Claridge's Hotel, 
Brook Street, London, W., has the following- 
animals for sale: — 11 Wapiti, including a 15 
and a 13 pointer, 13 Cross-Bred between Wapiti 
Red Deer, and Altai, including a 17, 14, and 13 
pointers, 4 Cross Deer (Red Deer, Wapiti, Altai 
and Marral, hinds), and several other Cross- 
Bred Deer, 3 Sambur, 2 Stags. 

That the Trade loses another fervent collector. 
Dr. Lovell Keays, Avhose advertisement appears 
in this issue. The worthy Doctor writes, date 
November 11th, as follows: — 

" Birls going like wild-fire ! I have al- 
ready sold and have on order nearly £100 worth. 
I am not parting with a single bird without cash 

first, even ., who had £33 worth, paid in 

advance. I offered the lot for £150, and was 
offered £100 which I refused. The telegrams 
and letters are simply bewildering." 

We must congratulate Dr. Lovell Keays 
that there is still such a value and demand for 
birds. 

That the Editor of "The Amateur Magazine" car, 
obtain all the information he requires bv ap- 
proaching an established and recognized Trade 
paper. An extract from one is given in this 
number. We can only add to that extract that 
well-known sentence, "Honi soit qui mal y 
pense." 

That 300! Canaries have arrived during the last 
four weeks. In normal times 6,000' (six thou- 
sand) would have arrived. This affords food 
and reflection for the critics. 

That some Monkeys, one Chimpanzee, with a few 
Grey Parrots, also a consignment of Amazon>. 
arrived in Liverpool. 

That in London there have been some dozen Indian 
Monkeys, 5 Cuckoos, 1 Barbet, 4 Mynahs, 19 
Moustache Parrakeets, 1 Crown Crane, 1 
Demoiselle Crane, witr 6 Alexandra Parrots, 
also 400 Senegal birds. 

That there is a great demand for Australian and 
Indian Parrots and Parrakeets. 

That just as we are going- to press we are offer; • 
1 large male Chimpanzee, 2l baby Chimpanzee, 
1 Mandrill. 

That we owe an apology to our Subscribers for 
the late appearance of this number. 



Printed by W. J. Hasted & Son, (T.U.), 306, Mile End Road, London, E. 



Telegrams : Hamlyn, London Docks, London, 



Telephone : 6341 Avenue 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East. 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station. 
Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence five minutes walk. 

P. O.O. payable at Leman Street, East. Cheques crossed " London County &> Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TERMS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from time of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back. TELEPHONE.— Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVJENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS.— Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIVERY. — Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

The arrivals from abroad during the past month have been very small. Particulars are given 



General Notes. 



Following Waterfowl offered — a bargain 
3 pairs Chilo Wigeon ... 
2 ,, ,, Fintail ... 
1 ,, Bahamas 
2J ,, Red Crested Pochards ... 
l| „ Chestnut Brested Teal 

The 20 Birds for £18 . 10 . ( 



50/6 
50/6 



50/6 
60/6 



hens 12/6 
„ 16/6 
,, 20/6 



25/- 



pair 25/6 
males 20/- 



S\ pairs Carolinas 

7 White Swans, females 

6 Jungle Fowls cocks 10/6 

4 Silver Pheasants ,, 12/6 
6 Golden ,, ,, 16/6 
1 large Blackbacked Gull 
Cormorants, feed from hand ... ... ... € 

Herons, fine condition ... 

1 Indian Sarus Cranes (Grus antigone), adults ... € 

1 Demoiselle Crane, very fine ... 

2 Australian Emus ,, „ ... ... ... e 

1 ,, tame, Lemon Crested Cockatoo, 

lately a performer 

5 Blue and Buff Macaws, talking ... ... e 

1 Red Blue Macaw, very fine ... 

(This is an exceptionally fine, large, tame bird. 
Some very tame white fronted Amazons ... e 

3 Blue fronted Amazons 
1 Orange-flanked 1'arrakeet, tame, perch on finger 

1 Grey checked Conure, actually talking 

4 Black Indian Cuckoos, most interesting birds ... 

2 Large Black Myuahs 

1 Indian Barbet 
4 ,, Red vented Bulbuls ... 

3 Australian Rosellas ... 

2 pairs Australian Ruficaudas ... 
2 extra fine African Grey Parrots, just arrived 

from the South West Coast ... ... ,, 50/6 

North American Grey Squirrels (Sciurus cinercus. A few of 

these interesting pets expected. Prices on application. 
15 Canadian Black White Skunks (Mephitis 

mephiticaj ... ... ... ... each 80/6 

These take the place of the Indian Mongoose for rats and 
all vermin. They are entirely devoid of any objectionable 
smell, the scent bacs being abstracted. The only Skunks at 



20/6 
25/6 
30/6 
10/6 
12/6 
12/6 
£10 
£5 
£12 

40/6 
£4 
£5 

22/6 
40/6 
40/6 
40/6 
30/6 
50/6 
30/6 
12/6 
25/6 
30/6 



•esent for sale 
in 80/6 each. 



Great Britain, and will not be sold less 



for 



Direct from South Africa: — 

1 male, adult, Blessbok (Damaliscus albifrons), in 

sound, healthy condition, first direct importa- 
tion for years. Very low price 

2 Cape Hyrax, Rock Rabbits (Hyrax capensis) ... 
2 American Raccoons (Procyon lotor), adult 

2 Foxes, adult. 1 Cub 

3 Australian pure bred Dingoes 

2 Marmozets, white whiskered 
1 White nosed Monkey, tame ... 

3 Chimpanzees, prices on application. 
Various Monkeys constantly arriving. 
Mongooses constantly arriving ... 

The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at The Zoologi 
cal Society s Gardens, Regents Park, London : — 

4 Heloderma suspectum ... ... ... each 

3 Stink pot Terrapins ... ... ... ... ,, 

1 Texas Terrapin 

2 American Green Tree Frogs ... ... ... ,, 

2 ,, Alligators, 3£ feet each ... ... ,, 

2 ,, King Snakes 

2 ,, Mocassin Snakes ... ... ... ,, 

1 ,, Chicken Snake 

1 ,, Hognosed Snake ... 

1 Indian Python 

6 Hardwickes Mastigure (Uromastix hardwickii) each 



lot for 100/- 

for £5 

each 40/6 

£5 



each 25/6 



40/6 
12/6 
12/6 
5/6 
70/6 
25/6 
25/6 
25/6 
25/6 
80/6 
10/6 



The following reptiles are expected shortly : — 
1 Anaconda, 12J feet long. 
1 „ 6 „ ,, 

6 Boa Constrictors. 
6 Rainbow Boas. 
4 Cooks Tree Boas. 

3 Parrot Snakes. 

4 Golden Tree Snakes. 
6 Water Snakes. 

With some Frogs, Bird eating Spiders, etc. Prices on application. 



ROLLER CANARIES, Season commencing. 
Cocks, I. class ... ... ... 12/6 each, 7 for 60/6 

„ II. ,, 7/6 „ 7 „ 50/6 

Hens, two beautiful birds, in wicker cage, 3/- ; 14, in 7 cages, 18/- 



Wanted to purchase. — 3 Fallow Deer immediately ; also, rare 
Pheasants and Parrakeets. 



^ 



o 




Hamlyns 
Menagerie 
Magazine 



E 



No. 8.— Vol. 1. 



DECEMBER, 1915. 



Price One Shilling. 



1 



CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTORY 

SOME OLD TIME AND PRESENT DAY SHOWMEN 

A CHIMPANZEE'S "NEST" ... 

THE EUROPEAN BISON 

ESTABLISHMENT CHARGES IN ZOOS 

JAMRACH'S ... 

AN OLD-TIME MENAGERIE ... 

ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND 

GENERAL NOTES 



& 



£ 



Telegrams : Hamlyn, London Docks, London, 



Telephone : 6341 Avenue 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St George's Street;, London Docks, East. 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station. 

Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence five minutes walk. 
P.O.O. payable at Leman Street, East. Cheques crossed " London County & Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TERMS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from time of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back. TELEPHONE. — Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS. — Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIYERY.— Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same. 



For the arrivals from 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

ibroad during the past month. Full Particulars are given in 



General Notes." 





£25 


for 


50/6 


-. 50/- 


, 60/- 


each 


40/6 




70/6 


,, 


60/6 


fot 


£7 


,, 


£4 



each 40/6 



Jorth American Grey Squirrels (Sciurus cinereus. A few of 
these interesting pets expected. Prices on application. 

15 Canadian Black White Skunks (Mephitis 

mephitica) ... ... ... ... each 80/6 

These take the place of the Indian Mongoose for rats and 
all vermin. They are entirely devoid of any objectionable 
smell, the scent bacs being abstracted. The only Skunks at 
present for sale in Great Britain, and will not be sold less 
than 80/6 each. 

Direct from South Africa : — 

1 male, adult, Blessbok (Damaliscus albifrons), in 
sound, healthy condition, first direct importa- 
tion for years. Very low price 

1 Cape Hyrax, Rock Rabbits (Hyrax capensis) ... 

10 Indian Rhesus Monkeys ... ... each 

4 Blackeared Marmozets 
3 Lapunda Apes. Pigtails. Price on application. 

5 Indian Jackals 

1 Indian Porcupine, very fine ... 
1 Red Deer Stag, 2 years old ... .„ 

Various Monkeys constantly arriving. 
Mongooses constantly arriving ... 

The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at The Zoologi 
cal Society's Gardens, Regents Park, London : — 
1 Heloderma suspectum 

1 American Green Tree Frog ... 

2 ,, Alligators, 3£ feet each 
2 ,, King Snakes 

2 ,, Mocassin Snakes ... 

3 Hardwickes Mastigure (Uromastix hardwickii) 
1 Florida Tortoise, very fine feeder 
1 Anaconda, 12 feet, splendid specimen... 

1 Anaconda, 6 feet ,, ,, 

6 Boa Constrictors, 6 to 8 feet ... ... each 

4 Cooks Tree Boas (Corallus cookii) 
3 Thick-necked Tree Boas (Epicrates cenchris) ... 

2 Banded Tailed Tree Snakes (Leptophis liocercus) 
1 Boddacrts Snake (Drymobius boddaerti) 
6 Angulated Snakes (Helicops angulatus) 

3 Giant Toads (Bufo marinus) ... 
10 Bird-eating Spiders (Avicularia avicularia) 

(Extraordinary specimens, seldom imported.) 

4 Gigantic Centepedes (Scolopendra gigantea) ... ,, 12/6 

Total amount deposited at Zoo — £80. 
A few small pet Alligators expected shortly. 



for 


40/6 




5/6 




70/6 


,, 


25/6 


,, 


25/6 


each 


10/6 


for 


40/6 




£15 




£6 


50/- 


60/- 


each 


30/- 


,, 


30/- 




30/- 


for 


80/- 


each 


25/- 


,, 


12/6 


» 


20/6 



lately 



30 Redheaded Pope Cardinals, very fine 
5 Glossy Cow Birds — males 
2 ,, ,, hens 

5 Zebra Finches — cocks 

1 Pileated Finch 

6 Saffron Finches 

2 Long-tailed Whydahs 

3 Ruficauda Finches ... 

2 Pennant Parrakeets ... 
1 Crimson-winged Parrakeet — cock only ; medium 

condition, otherwise worth £5 ... 
120 Budgerigars, adults, breeding pairs ... 
1 Grey Checked Conure 
1 Tame, Lemon Crested Cockatoo, 

performer 

3 Blue and Buff Macaws, talking 
Some very tame white fronted Amazons 

3 Blue fronted Amazons 

1 Indian Barbet 

4 „ Red vented Bulbuls ... 

2 extra fine African Grey Parrots, just arrived 

from the South West Coast 

3 Cormorants, feed from hand ... 

1 Indian Sarus Cranes (Grus antigone), adults ... 

2 Australian Emus, very fine ... 

(These are adult splendid birds, been outdoors 2 

7 White Swans, females ... ... 25/-, 

6 Jungle Fowls cocks 10/6 hens 12/6 

Following Waterfowfr offered — a bargain : — 

3 pairs Chilo Wigeon ... 
2 ,, ,, Pintail ... 
1 ,, Bahamas 
2J ,, Red Crested Pochards ... 

The 17 Birds for £17. 



Expected Shortly— 

4 South African Stanley Cranes. 

2 ,, ,, Secretary Birds. 

(Prices on application.) 

ROLLER CANARIES, Season commencing. 
Cocks, I. class ... ... ... 12/6 each, 7 for 60/6 

,, II. ,, ... ... ... 7/6 ,, 7 ,, 50/6 

Hens, two beautiful birds, in wicker cage, 3/- ; 14, in 7 cages, 18/- 



each 


7/6 


,, 


7/6 


,, 


5/6 


,, 


4/6 


for 


7/6 


pair 


10/6 




12/6 


,, 


SO/6 


>■ 


80/6 


for 


25/6 


pair 


5/6 


for 


lb/6 




40/6 


each 


£4 




22/6 




40/6 




30/6 


" 


12/6 


„ 


50/6 


,, 


10/6 




£10 


,, 


£12 


years.) 


males 20/- 


pair 


20/6 


pair 


50/6 




50/6 




60/6 


., 


50/6 



Wanted to purchase.— Rare Pheasants and Parrakeets. 



Hamlim's Jttettajjerie Jttagajto. 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 8.— Vol. 



LONDON, DECEMBER, 1915. 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

List of Subscribers, Oct. 16th to Dec. 4th. 

Dr. F. D. Baker, National Zoological Park, 

Washington, D.C., U.S. A, 
F. E. Blaauw, Gooilust, S. Gramland, Hilversum, 

Holland. 
Dr. Eliot, Earlstown, Lancashire. 
Dr. Lovell Keays, East Hoathley, Sussex. 
W. H. St. Quinton, Scampston Hall, Rillington, 

York. 
The Superintendent, Victoria Gardens Office, 

Bombay, India. 

A. Woodward, Mayville, Kingston-by-Sea, 
Brighton. 

The Director, Zoological Gardens, Copenhagen. 



The subscription for Vol. I., Nos. 1 to 12, is 
6/- post free. Only specimen copies can be sent 
at 6d. each. All subscriptions commence with 
No. 1. The price of this December Number is 
1/-, post free. There are 76 subscribers up to 
date. I am anxious to increase this number to 
100 before the end of 1915. 

Negotiations are in progress to place this 
Magazine on sale at the various railway book- 
stalls. Articles are on hand and are promised by 
the Leading Collectors and Dealers throughout 
the world. Many subscribers are asking for per- 
sonal recollections and adventures. These will all 
appear in due course. I trust my various readers 
will appreciate "Old Time" articles and reviews. 
The present day Amateur knows very little of the 
"Old Time" Menagerie, Zoos, and the various 
dealers of long ago. The short account given 
here of "An Old Time Menagerie" recalls a 
famous Menagerie of the past. 

Many interesting reproductions of old photo- 
graphs will appear from time to time. I have a 
collection of several hundred. The first appears 
in this issue, of which particulars are given on 
the other side. 



Advertisements are inserted at very reason- 
able rates. 

If you have not already sent in your 6/- sub- 
scription, might I respectfully ask you to do so? 

JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



SOME OLD TIME AND PRESENT DAY 
SHOWMEN 

at a Menagerie Sale in 1896. 

The interesting photograph appearing on 
page 5 was taken at a Menagerie Sale in 189'6. 

In the front, sitting down on the turf, are : — 
Bob Fossett, Tom Holden, with the Masters Bos- 
tock and Braham. 

On the front row, sitting down, from the 
left, among'st others are R. Anderton, Pat Collins,. 
F. T. Salva, Frank Bailey, John D. Hamlyn,, 
Heinrich Hagenbeck, Karl Hagenbeck, Billy Rus- 
sell, Lord George Sanger, E. H. Bostock, Ran- 
dell Williams, W. A. Upton, Claude Ginnett and 
Major Rowe. 

Standing up at the back, A. Fitt, Frank Bos- 
tock, Sydney Braham, Buff Bill, Tom Norman,, 
Francis Ferrari, Frank Charles Bostock and T. 
Read. 

Many of the above have left us and crossed 
the "Great Divide" where, I trust, they have 
entered into another sphere of usefulness. Their 
number, unfortunately, is great. They are R. 
Anderton, Frank Bailey, Frank Charles Bostock, 
Sydney Braham, Creber, Jimmy Chittock, Fran- 
cis Ferrari, Karl Hagenbeck, T. Read, Lord 
George Sanger, W. A. Upton, Randell Williams, 
Jim Walmsley, with others whose names for the 
moment I have forgotten. I believe it was a suc- 
cessful sale for the Proprietor. It was also a most 
enjoyable day for the company, for many of the 
above travelled hundreds of miles to be present. 
It was a reunion of Circus and Menagerie pro- 
prietors, Wild Beast dealers, and of the Show 
World in general, and my one and only regrel is 
that we shall never all meet together again. 

JOHN I). HAMLYN, 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



A CHIMPANZEES "NEST." 

An interesting note upon a "nest" made by 
a chimpanzee at Belle Vue has been contributed 
by Mr. George Jennison to the proceedings of the 
Zoological Society of London/ "- Mr. Jennison 
writes: — "A female chimpanzee (Anthropopithe- 
cus calvus) was purchased for our collection in 
May, 1913. She was not, in fact is not yet, adult, 
but had good health, and was kept until May, 
1914, in a rather small cage, having access to 
the open air. She was then removed to our new 
Chimpanzee house, and installed in a large cage, 
through the middle of which there is a beam about 
three inches wide- Early in August it was noticed 
that she took a small supply of hay, or would 
even fray out a rope and lay it carefully along* the 
beam and there lie. We therefore nailed a rough 
branch horizontally from the beam to the wall, so 
enclosing a space of about three feet, and another 
cross-branch to make a very roug-h base, and 
provided a supply of hay, straw, and leafed twigs 
which were thrown on the floor ten feet below. 
Next morning the nest was partly made. Careful 
watching by Mr. W. Antcliffe, the keeper, showed 
that she carried up at first one or two straws, and 
then proceeded to gather a bundle of twigs, which 
she tucked between one leg and thigh, dragging 
herself to her nest by her arms and the other leg. 

The twigs were carefully arranged with the 
leaves to the centre of the nest, and she also 
gathered up one of her swingigng ropes, laying it 
in short parallel lines on the twigs. Mindful of 
Du Chaillu ("Exploration in Equatorial Africa"), 
we nailed suitable branches over the nest as a 
basis for a roof, but no- attempt has been made to 
utilise them to form a shelter, as, of course, there 
is no rain in the house. The animal spends most 
of her time in the nest, and carries all her food 
there, even a glass of tea, which is taken up, like 
the nesting material, in the hollow of the thigh. 
From time to time the nest is either thrown out or 
falls through, and is reconstructed with fresh 
material. Having succeeded so well with this 
animal, similar facilities were given to three 
females (A. troglodytes) in the adjoining cage, but 
no attempt was made to use them. Nevertheless, 
although they usually sleep on the floor-level, they 
will carrv a sack into their trees and sleep upon 
it. A. calvus, the "nest" builder, will also take 
up a sack and sleep on it." 

It may be mentioned that two tine pairs of 
elands (the largest African antelopes) have recently 
been added to the collection at the Gardens from 
the famous herd of the Duke of Bedford. Another 
addition is the brown bear, which by an order of 
the court was taken from a travelling Serbian 
showman last week. Mr. Jennison tells us it was 
a weary object on arrival, but in three days became 
chirpy as a cricket. 



THE EUROPEAN BISON. 

By Walter Winans. 

In answer to your letter of to-day's date, I 
give below further particulars about the Aurochs. 

The Aurochs are the original wild cattle found 
all over Europe, and which Julius Caesar mentions 
as being found in Gaul. 

In the Sachsen-Wald, Friderichs-Ruh, near 
Hamburg, the property of the Bismarck family, 
where I have shot many wild boar, a thousand 
years ago Aurochs were hunted by Charlemagne. 

They are now extinct except at Pilawin, in 
Poland, and in one or two of the Emperor of Rus- 
sia's private shooting- estates. I should not think 
there are more than 60 all told in. the world; the 
one I shot had to be killed, as he was killing off 
the young Aurochs bulls. 

They are very near relations to the American 
Bison and cross freely, but the Aurochs are the 
more savage animal and grows larger; the one I 
shot stood 6 feet 5/8 inches at the withers, girth 
9 feet 7/8 of an inch, 15| inches between the eyes, 
11 feet 1/8 inches long including- tail. 

Through the kindness of Count Joseph Patot- 
ski, I was able to shoot the record Aurochs head 
in 1913. 

The dimensions were as follows : — 
Distance between tips of horns, 21 1/8 inches. 
Length along outside curve of horn, 21J inches. 
Widest between horns, 24 3/16 inches. 
Weight, 2,001 pounds. 

The Count had a cairn of stones erected on 
the spot where the Aurochs fell, and a bronze cast 
of the skull and horns on top with an inscription. 

This head is a shade better than the former 
record head, in the South Kensington Natural 
History Museum, which was shot by His late 
Majesty, the Emperor Alexander III. 

Count Patotski, besides the herd of Aurochs, 
had some American Buffalo, but the Aurochs I 
shot had killed the bulls of that herd. 

This herd of Aurochs is the only one in exist- 
ence besides that preserved on the Imperial estates 
of Russia. 

I am very much afraid the fighting near War- 
saw has done damage to the Count's preserves; 
if so, the finest shooting- estate, in the world has 
been destroyed, as he had also herds of Wapiti, 
Elk, and many species of deer at Pilawin. 

I have shot American Buffalo also, and the 
difference I noticed between them and the Aurochs 
may be of interest. 

To begin with, the smell is quite different; 
Buffalo smell like cattle, but the Aurochs have a 
peculiar Oriental smell rather like when incense 
is burnt; I have never smelt such a peculiar smell 
in any animal. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



The coat was a faded yellow-brown colour, 
very coarse; it looked like a badly worn door-mat, 
the neck was not dark like the American Buffalo. 

He was very savage, and tried to charge, al- 
though I gave him, as soon as he appeared, a 
right and left almost touching the heart at 50 
yards. 

He had killed a horse and badly injured his 
rider a few days before; he was a solitary bull 
turned out of the herd as rogue elephants are. 

It may interest you to know that I shot a 
two-year-old Wapiti who was a thirteen pointer 
(I think this is unique for a two-year-old) the 
other day at Surrenden. 

The day I shot the Aurochs I also shot an Elk 
and a Wapiti, which I think could be done in no 
other estate except Pilawin. 

I have just been informed that the reports in 
some newspapers, some of them illustrated, of a 
herd of Aurochs attacking German troops in Rus- 
sia, and being annihilated, are absolutely false. 

There has been no fighting near Pilawin, 
Count Joseph Patotski's estate in Russian Poland, 
and the Aurochs are quite safe. 



ESTABLISHMENT CHARGES IN ZOOS. 

By Frank Finn. 
One of the finest monuments of French 
thoroughness I have ever come across is the three- 
volume work of Dr. Gustave Loisel, "Histoire 
des Menageries," in which he traces the fortunes 
of zoological collections from antiquity down 
through the Middle Ages to the present day, the 
work having appeared in 1912. It is naturally 
the third volume which deals with modern zoologi- 
cal collections, and perhaps the most interesting 
section of this is that which deals with the ex- 
penses of upkeep of the various Zoological Gar- 
dens. Especially interesting are the salaries paid 
to the officials in different places, but in many 
cases details were evidently not available about 
these, only lump sums being given. Thus, for 
instance, we do not find set down the salaries of 
the officials of the two Paris Zoos, the Menagerie 
du Jardin des Mantes and the Jardin Zoologiquc 
de l'Acclimatation. We can, however, form some 
idea of what zoo administration costs in France 
by the salaries paid at the little zoo of Mar- 
seilles, where, it seems, the Curator gets 600 
francs a year, with house and heating; the head 
gardener 2,200 francs, the six keepers from 1,200 
to 1,400 francs. The garden seems to have a dis- 
proportionate importance, here, lor there are as 
many as twenty under-gardeners, whose pay is 
not given. 

At our own Zoo the gardener's wages arc 
cited as £124 per annum, with housing, while the 
.Superintendent gets £500 and housing, heating, 
lighting and water, together with any travelling 



expenses. The Bird Curator (who is also Officer 
of Works, by the way) gets £400 annually, and 
the Reptile Curator half that amount; the Patholo- 
gist the same as the last. The Assistant Superin- 
tendent gets £200 also, but with housing; the 
Chief Keeper is also housed in addition to a salary 
of £102, but the head of the Works Department is 
not housed, receiving a salary of £144. The 
Storekeeper is paid £96, the 20 junior Keepers 
£72, senior Keepers £78, and Head Keepers £90. 
No details are given about salaries in the Bristol 
and Dublin zoos, and that at Edinburgh did not 
exist at the time Dr. Loisel 's book was published. 
Neither are there any accounts of salaries paid at 
Melbourne or at Cairo, so for staff expenses at 
zoos run by English-speaking people we must 
turn to the American institutions where details are 
fortunately full in the case of New York, the Direc- 
tor, receiving, we are told, 8,000 dollars annually, 
the Bird and Reptile Curators 2,400, also annually, 
while the Veterinary, whose job is a half-time one, 
gets 110 dollars a month. The two head keepers, 
one for birds and one for reptiles, receive 80' dol- 
lars monthly, and of the other keepers, eleven get 
70 and eight 60 per mensem. The Storekeeper 
has 50 dollars monthly, two gardeners 70' dollars 
a month, and of three under-gardeners two have 
55 and one 40. 

Philadelphia gives no> details, but Washing- 
ton Zoo pays its Superintendent 3,300' dollars and 
the Under-Superintendent 2,000, presumably an- 
nually. There are no details about salaries at the 
Buenos Ayres zoo, so we may leave America al- 
together and return to Europe for the considera- 
tion of salaries paid at Continental gardens in 
countries we have not noticed, where sufficient 
details are given. 

We find, then, that at Amsterdam the Direc- 
tor gets 6,000 florins annually, with housing, 
lighting and water; the 22i menagerie and 2 
aquarium keepers, the 2 storekeepers and 5 gar- 
deners, get from 10' to 15 florins weekly. Antwerp 
used to pay (we fear things are very different 
now !) 12,000 francs to its Director, who was also 
housed. The Inspector-General got 4,000 francs, 
and there were 32 keepers, whose salary is not 
specially stated, but it ranged, for these and other 
subordinates, between 120 and 200 1 francs a month. 

Berlin paid its Scientific Director (in 1911) 
16,000' marks, and housed him; the Administrative 
Director got 12,000, the Scientific Assistant 5,500; 
the garden-inspector was paid 1,800 and housed, 
and the head keeper also got housing as well as 
a salary of 2,100' marks. The 14 keepers' wages 
in 1911 are not stated, but in 1907 they were up 
to 1,500', and three of them had housing in ad- 
dition; 17 helpers in 1911 were paid up to 4 marks 
a day. 

Breslau paid its Director 5,000 to 9,000 
marks, and supplied travelling expenses, hous- 
ing and heat; the head gardener there had 2,700, 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



and the store keeper 1,650, also with heat and 
housing; the 9 keepers and 4 assistants got 
daily wages of from 2.10 to 3.50 marks, and 4 of 
them also got lodging and heating. 

The only other German Zoo* giving full details 
is Hamburg, whose Director received 14,000 
marks and housing, besides 700 1 marks extra for 
lighting-, heating and life insurance. Here the 
head keeper, who is also store keeper, is put 
down for 321 marks a week, the head gardener the 
same, rising to 35, and the 13 keepers 2:3 to 29, 
while 3 to 5 helpers were paid, by the day, 3.50 1 
marks. 

Rotterdam's Zoological Director receives a 
payment of 4,400 florins, and his. deputy 21,400;, 
apparently annually; the gardener in charge of 
the greenhouses gets apparently nearly as much, 
with 2,000, for he is lodged in addition; the head 
keepers for the animals and the gardens, respec- 
tively, receive 1,350 and 850 respectively, and are 
both housed at the gardens. The chief officer of 
the works is paid 1,400 florins, and the 14 keepers 
receive weekly wages of 11 to 12 florins. 

The Imperial Zoo> of Schonbrum, Vienna, was 
spending, at the time Dr. Loisel wrote, 3', 600' 
crowns annually to its Inspector, also housing 
him; a Veterinary Assistant, also housed, received 
1,600', and the General Overseer also had hous- 
ing in addition to a salary of 2,000 crowns; four 
"titular" keepers had 6,600' between them, and 
ten other keepers 13,680l 



For the information of readers we may men- 
tion that the values of the foreign coins mentioned 
in Mr. Finn's article were at the time of the 
publication of Dr. Loisel's work, as follows : — 

Francs, 25 to £; Dollars, 5 to 20/10; Florins, 

12 to £; Crowns, 1,000 to £40; 1,000 fcs. = 

£40; 1,152 florins = £96, 



JAMRACH'S. 



A subscriber has kindly sent us the following 
interesting article on the late Charles Jamraeh, 
which appeared in the first number of a well- 
known magazine twenty-six years> ago. 

We only regret not having a portrait of this 
famous old gentleman, but should any of our 
numerous readers lend one for reproduction in 
this Magazine, it shall be returned forthwith. 



The shop we are about to visit — perhaps quite 
the most remarkable in London — stands in a re- 



markable street, Ratcliff Highway. Ratcliff High- 
Avay is not what it was — indeed, its proper name 
is now St. George's Street, but it still retains 
much of its old eccentric character. The casual 
pedestrian who wanders from the neighbourhood 
of the Mint, past the end of Leman Street and 
the entrance to' the London Dock, need no longer 
fear robbery with violence; nor may he with any 
confidence look to witness a skirmish of crimps 
and foreign sailors with long knives; but, if his 
taste for observation incline to more tranquil har- 
vest, his eye, quiet or restless, will fall upon many 
a reminder of the Highway's historic days, and of 
those relics of its ancient character which still 
linger. Sailors' boarding-houses are seen in 
great numbers, often with crossed flags, or a ship 
in full sail, painted, in a conventional spirit pecu- 
liar to the district, upon the windows. Here and 
there is a slop shop where many dangling oilskins 
and sou '-westers wave in the breeze, and where, 
as often as not, an old figure-head or the effigy 
of a naval officer in the uniform of fifty years ago 
stands as a sign. There are shops where advance 
notes are changed, and where the windows pre- 
sent a curious medley of foreign bank notes, clay 
pipes, china tobacco-jars, and sixpenny walking 
sticks, and there are many swarthy-faced men, 
with ringed ears, with print shirts and trousers 
unsupported by braces; also' there are many ladies 
with gigantic feathers in their bonnets, of painful 
hue, and other ladies who get along Aery com- 
fortably without any bonnets at all. 

In a street like this, every shop is, more or 
less, an extraordinary one; but no stranger would 
expect to find in one of them the largest and most 
varied collection of arms, curiosities, and works 
of savage and civilised art brought together for 
trade purposes in the world, and this side by side 
with a stock of lions, tigers, panthers, elephants, 
alligators, monkeys or parrots. Such a shop, v 
however, will be the most interesting object of \ 
contemplation to the stray wayfarer through St. 
George's Street, and this is the shop famed 
throughout the world as Jamrach's. Everybody, 
of course, knows Jamrach's by name, and per- 
haps most know it to be situated somewhere in 
the waterside neighbourhood of the East End; 
but few consider it anything more than an em- 
porium from which the travelling menageries are 
supplied with stock. This, of course, it is, but it 
is something besides; and, altogether, one of the 
most curious, and instructive spots which the 
seeker after the quaint and out-of-the-way may 
visit is Jamrach's. 

The shop, which we find on the left-hand side 
as we approach it from the west, is a double one, 
and might easily be taken for two separate estab- 
lishments. The first window we reach might be 
passed as that of an ordinary bird fancier's, were 
Continued on Page 6. 






HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 




HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



the attention not attracted by the unusually neat, 
clean, and roomy appearance of the cages dis- 
played, and the uncommon shapes and colours of 
the birds which inhabit them. The next window 
is more catching to the eye. Furious Japanese 
figures, squatting Hindoo gods, strange and 
beautiful marine shells, and curious pottery bring 
the pedestrian to a stand, and arouse, a desire to 
explore within. All this outside, however, gives 
small promise of the strange thing-s to be seen 
and learnt behind the scenes. Returning to the 
door by the aviary window, we enter, and find 
ourselves in a bright, clean room, eighteen or 
twenty feet square, properly warmed by a stove 
placed in the centre. The walls, from floor to ceil- 
ing, are fitted with strong and commodious cages, 
in which birds of wonderful voice and hue,, and 
monkeys of grotesque lineament yell, whistle, 
shriek, and chatter. Great and gorgeous parrots 
of rare species flutter and scream, and blinking 
owls screw their heads aside as we pass. But the 
cause in chief of all this commotion is the presence 
of an attendant in shirt-sleeves who., carrying 
with him a basket, is distributing therefrom cer- 
tain eatables much coveted hereabout. Beaked 
heads are thrust between bars, and many a long, 
brown arm reaches downward and forward from 
the monkey-cages, in perilous proximity to the 
eager beaks. In a special cage, standing out from 
the rest, a beautiful black and white lemur sits 
and stretches his neck to* be fondled as the attend- 
ant passes, but shyly hides his faces when we 
strangers approach him. 

Here Mr. Jamrach himself comes to meet us 
— a fine old gentleman, whose many years and 
remarkable experiences have left but small im- 
pression upon him. Coming from Hamburg — 
where his father before him was a trading natura- 
list — he founded the present business in Shadwell 
more than fifty years ago, and here he is still in 
his daily harness, with all the appearance of being 
quite fit for another half-century of work among 
snakes and tigers. His two sons — one of whom 
we shall presently meet — have assisted him in the 
business all their lives. The elder of these, who 
was a widely-known naturalist of great personal 
popularity, died some few years since. 

Mr. Jamrach takes us into a small dusty back 
room, quaint in its shape and quaint in its. con- 
tents. Arms of every kind which is not an ordin- 
ary kind, stand in corners, hang on walls, and 
litter the floors; great two-handed swords of 
mediaeval date and of uncompromisingly English 
aspect stand amid heaps of Maori clubs, African 
spears, and Malay kreeses; on the floor lies, open, 
a deal box filled with rough sheets of tortoise- 
shell, and upon the walls hang several pictures 
and bas-reliefs. Mr. Jamrach picks up by a string 
a dusty piece of metal, flat, three-quarters of an 
inch thick, and of odd shape, rather resembling a 
cheese-cutter. This, we are informed, is a bell. 



or, perhaps more accurately, a gong, and was 
used on the tower of a Burmese temple to sum- 
mon the worshippers. Reaching for a short knob- 
kerry, which bears more than one sign of having 
made things lively on an antipodean skull, Mr. 
Jamrach strikes the uninviting piece of metal upon 
the side in such a way as to cause it to spin, and 
we, for the first time, fully realise what sweet 
music may lie in a bell. The sound is of the 
most startling volume — as loud as that of a good- 
sized church bell, in fact — and dies away very 
slowly and gradually in a prolonged note of indes- 
cribable sweetness. The metal is a peculiar amal- 
gam, silver being the chief ingredient; and, oh ! 
that all English church bells — and, for that matter, 
dinner bells — had the beautiful voice of this quaint 
bit of metal ! 

Then Mr. Jamrach shows us wonderful and 
gorgeous marine shells, of extreme value and 
rarity, and some of a species which he originally 
introduced to men of science, in consequence of 
which it now bears an appalling Latin name end- 
ing with " jamrachus." 

To be continued. 



AN OLD-TIME MENAGERIE. 

Our contemporary, "The Field," has a most 
interesting and well informed article on the late 
George Wombwell. It will be read with pleasure, 
especially by those who take an interest in old 
time concerns appertaining to the Wild Beast 
trade. 

On November 16th, 1850, there passed away 
the celebrated menagerie proprietor, George 
Wombwell, who at one time was such a popular 
favourite at the London fairs, and achieved a 
name for himself which is still remembered. His 
untiring industry and skill kept him at the head 
of the walk of life he chose for very many years. 
He is said to have started earning his living as a 
cobbler in what was then called Monmouth Street, 
Seven Dials. As a boy it is understood that he 
evinced a liking for keeping such ordinary pet 
animals as birds, rabbits, and dogs, but according 
to some accounts, while he was keeping a shoe- 
maker's shop in Soho, he visited the London 
Docks one day, and came across some boa con- 
strictors, part ol a cargo which had just been 
brought into this country. At that time the real 
character of these reptiles was not so well known 
as it is now, and so it is not astonishing to hear 
that these particular snakes were sold for sums 
much below their value. Wombwell, seeing that 
there was money in the idea, bought a pair, and 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



in a very short timme realised considerably more 
than the purchase money by their exhibition. This 
purchase gave him a start, and he gradually be- 
came an importer of wild animals and a proprietor 
of one of the largest and finest collections on the 
road, while later on he started or acquired others. 
His small yellow business card bore the device 
of a tiger and the inscription : 

Wombwell, 

Wild Beast Merchant, 

Commercial Road, 

London. 

"All sorts of foreign animals, birds, etc., bought, 

sold, or exchanged at the Repository, or the 

travelling menagerie." 

He was a regular attendant at Bartholomew 
Fair, but the story is stold that on one occasion 
he nearly missed it, for a fortnight beforehand his 
menagerie was at Newcastle-on-Tyne. Hearing, 
however, that a rival was advertising that his 
collection would be the only wild beast show in 
the fair, Wombwell made a forced road march 
to London, and succeeded in arriving" in time, but 
in so doing lost his elephant, who- died from the 
exertions that it made. The news spread, of 
course, and the enterprising rival announced that 
his menagerie contained "the only living elephant 
in the fair," whereupon Wombwell had painted 
on a long strip of canvas the words, "The only 
dead elephant in the fair," and the quaintness of 
the idea gained him the victory. 

Thomas Frost when a boy always made a 
point of visiting Wombwell's show at Croydon, 
and tells us that he could never sufficiently admire 
the gorgeouslv uniformed bandsmen, whose 
brazen instruments brayed and blared from noon 
till night on the exterior platform, and the im- 
mense pictures suspended from lofty poles of ele- 
phants and giraffes, lions and tigers, zebras, boa 
constrictors, and whatever else was most wonder- 
ful in the brute creation or most susceptible of 
brilliant colouring. The difference in the scale to 
which the zoological rarcties within were depicted 
on the canvas, as compared with the figures of 
men that were represented, was a very character- 
istic feature of these pictorial displays. The boa 
constrictor was given the girth of an ox, and the 
white bear should have been as large as an ele- 
phant, judging by the size of the sailors who 
were attacking him among his native icebergs. 
Many of the animals used to perform, the elephant 
of Siam, lor example, uncorking bottles and de- 
ciding lor the rightful heir, while the two famous 
lions, Nero and Wallace, were shown off by the 
keeper, " Manchester Jack." These were the lions 
which Wombwell is said to have turned against 
several mastiff dogs, and Hone quotes an account 
of the incident from the "Times" which docs 



not make very edifying reading. According to 
Frost, the lion Wallace was sometimes called 
Nero, and the newspapers reported two of these 
lion baitings, though the story appears to have 
been an exaggeration in some particulars, for it 
is not absolutely clear whether one or both lions 
were baited. 

To show how popular W r ombwell's menagerie 
was, it may be mentioned that the takings 
amounted to £1,700 at Bartholomew's Fair in the 
year 1826; and about that time the old showman 
advertised "that most wonderful animal, the 
bonassus, being the first of the kind which had 
ever been brought to Europe," and great crowds 
flocked to see this very fine specimen of an Ameri- 
can bull buffalo, which was afterwards sold to the 
Zoological Society. It was while performing in 
W'ombwell's menagerie that poor Helen Blight, a 
so-called "lion queen," met her death. She had 
very imprudently struck a sulky tiger with her 
whip, and the enraged animal killed her before 
help could arrive, this causing a stop to be put to 
such performances by women for many years. 
Wombwell at one time had a really fine collec- 
tion, for he mustered twelve lions, besides lion- 
esses and cubs, eight tigers, a tigress and cubs, 
a black tiger, several leopards, a jaguar, a puma, 
several kinds of bears, three elephants, a fine one- 
horned rhinoceros, and several deer and antelopes. 
On one occasion a good deal of excitement was 
caused by an elephant in the early hours of the 
morning- walking through Croydon and forcing 
his way into a confectioner's shop, after which 
he helped himself liberally to whatever he found 
there. No other harm was done, and the delin- 
quent was speedily recaptured, but Wombwell, 
though he gained an excellent advertisement, was, 
of course, compelled to compensate the injured 
tradesman. 

Wombwell died at Richmond in his living 
carriage at the age of seventy-three, and was 
buried in Highgatc Cemetery, his coffin being 
made of oak from the timbers of the " Royal 
Ceorgc," and the menagerie was, according to 
his will, divided into three parts, which were be- 
queathed to his widow and relations. Mrs. 
Wombwell retired sixteen years later, and Fair- 
grieve, who succeeded her, sold the collection by 
auction at Edinburgh in 1872, and it is said that 
the proceeds were a little under £3,000 Wombwell 
is reputed to have had to pay £35 a day to keep 
his three large menageries going-, and, of course, 
he lost heavily through mortality. He was a 
painstaking showman who paid great attention 
to the care of his animals, and to the day of his 
death took an active interesl in all matters con- 
nected with the menagerie, often giving his ser- 
vants a practical lesson how things should be 
done. The name lingered long after the old 

show man had passed away. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Hamlgn's Jifattagme jEagasfttu. 

Published on the 15th of each month. 



Editorial and Business Office (pro tem) :— 

221, ST. GEORGE'S STREET, LONDON, E. 
Telephone: Avenue 6341. 
Telegrams : " Hamlyn, London Docks, London." 

Advertisement Rates, very reasonable, on application. 

The Editor will be glad to receive for publication articles 
and all interesting photos, the imports and exports of all 
Stock, and foreign adventures with all wild stock. The 
subscription is 6/- per ann., or 6d. per copy, post free, 
which will be sent under cover. 



ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF 
IRELAND. 

The Council met on Saturday, 4th December, 
Dr. R. R. Leeper (Vice-President) in the chair,. 
The Secretary stated the following gifts had been 
received : — Vegetables, from Mrs. Gibson Black; 
seeds for the bird collection, from Miss Linda Hil- 
las; a donkey for the carnivora, from Mr. Wis- 
dom Hely; a cow, from Lady Ardilaun. Much 
assistance can be rendered the Society by those 
who have for disposal horses or other suitable 
animals which have to be done away with, by rea- 
son of old age or sometimes other causes, by re- 
membering to write or telephone to the Zoologi- 
cal Gardens, offering these animals to the Society. 
A very heavy weekly expenditure is incurred in 
feeding the large carnivora, and donations of the 
kind referred to are of great assistance. The visi- 
tors to the Gardens for the week are 654. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

That "The Daily Sketch," November 22nd, gave 
us quite a delightful notice which is well worth 
reproducing : — 

"Have you ever heard of 'Hamlyn's Men- 
agerie Magazine'? There's good stuff in it. 
I read in the November number that one 
Peter, a chimpanzee, is now on his way to 
the Cape, to join a circus there. Mr. Hamlyn 
says of him : — 

We had Peter quite a time. He was the 
most wayward chimpanzee that ever passed 
through our hands. His chief pleasure con- 
sisted in destroying the furniture, and chas- 
ing the maid-of-all-work up and down stairs. 
Still we all loved him." 



That a cable has been received announcing the 
safe arrival of "Peter" at Cape Town last 
Wednesday. The little fellow is now in a land 
of perpetual sunshine. I have never forgotten 
four lines given me whilst travelling in South 
Africa many years ago, concerning that delight- 
ful country. Here they are, to the best of my 
recollection; if wrong, perhaps some Africander 
will correct me : — 

Birds without song, 

Flowers without smell, 

Rivers without water, 

Women without virtue. 



That the arrivals since November 15th almost 
show a return of the arrival of old times. I 
was greatly surprised to receive from an old 
trader on the 16th November a small lot of 
choice Australian birds. There were 4 King 
Parrots, 2 Bloodwings, 9 Pennants, 4 Rosellas, 
1 Bloodrump, and 4 white Cockatoos, all in 
the pink of condition. Another consignment 
on the 2.9th November from Calcutta : 185 
Rhesus monkeys, with 1 Indian Porcupine. On 
the 9th December, a very choice collection from 
the West Indies, comprising 25 Anocondas, 
Boas, with other mixed snakes, also 12 Bird- 
eating Spiders, 4 giant Centepedes. and 3 giant 
Toads. The spiders are most interesting, being 
worthy the attention of every collector. The 
Centepedes are of an extraordinary size. On 
the 11th December, 3 very fine Lapunda Apes, 
and 5 young Jackals. Just to satisfy some 
Amateurs, I wish to state that special orders 
were obtained for their landing. , 



That several consignments have arrived in Liver- 
pool from South America and the W. Indies : 
Amazons, Cardinals, Saffrons, Cowbirds, 
Marmozets, Jays, etc. One local dealer is re- 
ceiving monthly consignments. 



That the West African arrivals have been prac- 
tically nil. Grev Parrots and African Monkeys 



are scarce. 



That only three small consignments of canaries 
have arrived during the past four weeks. 



That so far I have not heard of any arrivals for 
Zoological Gardens or private individuals. 



That "The Amateur Menagerie" Monthly Bulle- 
tin for December contains two short interesting 
notices, one especially of the Zoological Gar- 
dens, Mvsore. 



That our readers will be sorry to hear that the 
twenty-eight foot Python at Lincoln Park Zoo, 
Chicago, is seriously ill, and fears are enter- 
tained for its recovery. 



Printed by W. J. Hasted & Son, (T.U.), 306, Mile End Road, London, E. 



WILLSON'S LIVE STOCK PROVIDERS, Ltd., 

37, New Oxford Street, London, W.C. 

Telephone— Gerrard, 7708. Telegrams— Highbred Westcent, London. Bankers— London County & Westminster. 



LONDON'S CHIEF EMPORIUM FOR DOGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



All our adult dogs are sold on 14 days' trial on condition that if not liked they will be 
exchanged for livestock to value from our stock within this period. 

All our Dogs are daily inspected by a Qualified Veterinary Surgeon. 






.A. ATISIT JS E/ESPEOTFTJLLY REQUESTED. 

E. W. LITTLE, F.z.s., 

Practical Naturalist and Taxidermist. 

SPECIALIST IN BIG GAME TROPHIES 
-AND FISH MOUNTING - 

Studios: 65, YORK STREET, BAKER STREET W. 

PADDINGTON 6903. 



THIS SPACE TO LET. 



p= 



«C 



^ 



ED 



Hamlyn^s 
Menagerie 
Magazine. 



: 



No. 9.- Vol. 1. 



JANUARY. 1916. 



Price One Shilling. 






CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTORY 

THE IMPORTATION OF HONEY-SUCKERS ... 
WORLD'S BIGGEST ELEPHANT DISCOVERED 
FURTHER REMINISCENCES OF OLD-TIME SHOWMEN 
EXPECTED BIRTH OF AN ELEPHANT IN EUROPE 
ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND 

REGIMENTAL PETS AT THE ZOO 

BOXING DAY IN LONDON ... 
JAMRACH'S ... 



GENERAL NOTES 



& 



^Oc 



4 






Telegrams: Hamlyn, London Docks, London, 



Telephone : 6341 Avenue 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East. 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutos from London Bridge Station. 
Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence fiYe minutes walk. 

P.O.O. payable at Leman Street, East. Cheques crossed " London County &* Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TERMS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from time of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back. TELEPHONE. — Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS —Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIVERY. — Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

For the arrivals from abroad during the past month. Full Particulars are given in 



General Notes.' 



North American Grey Squirrels (Sciurus cinereus. 

Females 20/6. Pairs 32/6. 

After two years delay, I have received a consignment of these 

well known pets. Grey Squirrels thrive in all our London Parks, 

and the various Zoological Gardens. They can be sent safely 

packed, and delivery guaranteed. Early application requested. 



African saddle backed Jackals. Each 60/6. 

These are the largest Jackals ever I have imported. 3 Males, 
2 Females, all in sound condition. 

12 Canadian Black White Skunks (Mephitis 

mephitica) ... ... ... ... each 80/6 

These take the place of the Indian Mongoose for rats and 
all vermin. They are entirely devoid of any objectionable 
smell, the scent bacs being abstracted. The only Skunks at 
present for sale in Great Britain. 

Direct from South Africa :— 

1 male, adult, Blessbok (Damaliscus albifrons), in 
sound, healthy condition, first direct importa- 
tion for years. Very low price ... ... £25 

1 Cape Hyrax, Rock Rabbits (Hyrax capensis) ... for 50/6 
4 Indian Rhesus Monkeys ... ... each 40/-, 50/-, 60/- 

2 Blackeared Marmozets ... ... ... each 40/6 

3 Lapunda Apes. Pigtails. ... ... ... ,, 60/6 

2 Patas or Hussar Monkeys ... ... ... ,, 40/6 

2 Bonnet Monkeys, extra large, adults. ... ... ,, 60/6 

1 Senegal Baboon ... ... ... ... M 80/6 

2 Meercats, from South Africa... ... ... ,, 40/6 

2 Mongooses, from India ... ... ... (1 40/6 

(These are for Rats and all Vermin) 

1 Red Deer Stag, 2 years old. ... ... ... M 80/6 



Male Chimpanzee, as per description in 



"Gilbert,' 
General Notes. 

This is a very intelligent young male, standing about 30 inches 
high, between 2 and 3 years old. Absolutely tame with anyone. 
Price reasonable. 



for 


40/6 


ii 


70/6 


>> 


25/6 


ii 


25/6 


each 


10/6 


for 


40/6 


. 


£15 




£6 


each 50/- 


60/- 


each 


30/- 




30/- 


for 


30/- 


each 


25/- 


• > 


12/6 


• 


20/6 



The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at The Zoologi- 
cal Society's Gardens, Regents Park, London : — 

1 Heloderma suspectum 

2 ,, Alligators, 3£ feet each 
2 ,, King Snakes 

2 ,, Mocassin Snakes ... 

3 Hardwickes Mastigure (Uromastix hardwickii) 
1 Florida Tortoise, very fine feeder 
1 Anaconda, 12 feet, splendid specimen... 

1 Anaconda, 6 feet ,, ,, 
6 Boa Constrictors, 6 to 8 feet ... 

4 Cooks Tree Boas (Corallus cookii) 
3 Thick-necked Tree Boas (Epicrates cenchris) . 

2 Banded Tailed Tree Snakes (Leptophis liocercus) 

1 Boddaerts Snake (Drymobius boddaerti) 
6 Angulated Snakes (Helicops angulatus) 

3 Giant Toads (Bufo marinus) ... 
8 Bird-eating Spiders (Avicularia avicularia) 

(Extraordinary specimens, seldom imported.) 

2 Gigantic Centepedes (Scolopendra gigantea) ... 

Total amount deposited at Zoo — £80. 

20 Redheaded Pope Cardinals, very fine ... each 7/6 

5 Glossy Cow Birds — males ... ... ... ,, 7/6 

2 ., ,, hens ... ... ... ,, 5/6 

3 Zebra Finches — cocks ... ... ... ,, 4/6 

1 Pileated Finch ... ... ... ... for 7/6 

6 Saffron Finches ... ... ... ... pair 10/6 

2 Long-tailed Whydahs ... ... ... ,, 12/6 

2 Ruficauda Finches ... ... ... ... ,, 30/6 

3 Blue and Buff Macaws, talking ... ... each £4 

Some very tame white fronted Amazons ... ,, 22/6 

3 Blue fronted Amazons ... ... ... ,, 40/6 

2 extra fine African Grey Parrots, just arrived 

from the South West Coast ... ... ,, 50/6 

1 Cormorant, feed from hand ... ... ... ,, 10/6 

1 Indian Sarus Cranes (Grus antigone), adults ... ,, £10 

2 Australian Emus, very fine ... ... ... ,, £12 

(These are adult splendid birds, been outdoors 2 years.) 

7 White Swans, females ... ... 25/-, males 20/- ; 

6 Jungle Fowls cocks 10/6 hens 12/6 pair 20/6 

2 South African Stanley Cranes. Prices on application. 

2 ,, ,, Secretary ,, ,, ,, 



Hamlims JEntag^rk JHagajin^ 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 9.— Vol. 1. 



LONDON, JANUARY, 1915. 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

List of Subscribers, 

December 15th to January 10th, 1916. 

J. F. Dewar, 2, St. Patrick's Square, Edinburgh. 

Guy Falkner, Westbourne House, Belton. 

Fred Thorniley, 43, Belgrave Road, Failsworth. 



The subscription for Vol. I., Nos. 1 to 12, is 
6/- post free. Only specimen copies can be sent 
at 6d. each. All subscriptions commence with 
No. 1. The price of this January Number is 1/-, 
post free. 

I have still a few December numbers for sale, 
1/-, post free. This contains- the reproduction of 
a photograph taken at a Menagerie Sale in 1896. 
I might mention that over one hundred were sold, 
in addition to the regular subscribers. 

Negotiations are in progress to place this 
Magazine on sale at the various railway book- 
stalls. Articles are on hand and are promised by 
the Leading Collectors and Dealers throughout 
the world. Many subscribers are asking for per- 
sonal recollections and adventures. These will all 
appear in due course. They are only held over 
for want of space. 

The conclusion of the "Sette Cama Recollec- 
tions," containing the native description of the 
supposed Water Elephant, will appear in the Feb- 
ruary number. 

An account of the first arrival of the Gouldian 
Finch in Europe, 1885, with interesting particu- 
lars of the first consignment ever brought for .sale 
to Great Britain. 

Many interesting reproductions of old photo- 
graphs will appear from time to time. I have a 
collection of several hundred. 

Advertisements are inserted at very reason- 
able rates. 

If you have not already sent in your 6/- sub- 
scription, might I respectfully ask you to do so? 

JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



THE IMPORTATION OF HONEY- 
SUCKERS. 

By Frank Finn. 

The habit of living more or less on honey 
sucked from flowers is found in several groups of 
birds, and some of these have long been imported, 
namely, various species of Lories, which are honey 
sucking Parrots. The Honey-eaters (Meliphagi- 
dae) of Australasia have, also been brought over, 
but with the exception of the Tui of New Zealand, 
now, unfortunately, not to be had (the New Zea- 
land Government prohibiting the export of all 
native birds but the sheep-killing Kea Parrot and 
egg-stealing Weka Rail), none have "caught on" 
at all, most being too deficient in bright colour to 
win favour with the public, while they are also 
generally quite ordinary birds in general appear- 
ance and size. 

It is quite otherwise with- the Sun-birds and 
Humming birds, which are so generally very small 
in size and beautifully decorated with metallic 
plumage; these little creatures have always at- 
tracted much notice in their native countries, but 
have been little imported owing to their delicacy. 
The Humming-birds, which are purely American, 
have gained the highest reputation; they average 
far smaller than the Old-world Sun-birds, and, un- 
like them, have not the ordinary shape and move- 
ments of little tree-birds in general, but, as 
everybody knows, feed while hovering, like some 
insects. In fact, one of their French names is 
"Oiscau-mouche" (fly bird), and their flight is so 
completely fly-like that they can go backwards or 
sideways as easily as forwards, and their wings, 
when in action, are hardly visible, being moved 
so rapidly. But, unlike flies, they cannot travel 
on their feet; they must either perch or fly, so that 
if their plumage gets sticky with the syrup sup- 
plied them, their exercise is cut off altogether. 

In spite of this difficulty, Humming-birds 
were brought to Europe long before Sun-birds, as 
far as I know; even more, than a century ago, 
Latham has recorded that a hen of the Mango 
Humming-bird (Lampornis mango) was captured 
and brought on board a ship, with her nest and 



2 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



eggs; she hatched her young, and these lived to 
reach England, and were kept some time; there 
by Lady Hammond, one living at least two 
months. There seems to be no further record till 
1857, when Gould, so well known for his un- 
rivalled illustrated works on birds, and on Hum- 
ming-birds in particular, brought over a pair of 
the North American Ruby-throated Humming- 
bird, and landed one safely in London, where it 
soon died, its companion having- succumbed in 
the Channel. As, however, the ship had a long- 
voyage, including crossing the Banks of New- 
foundland, where the little birds became torpid 
now and then from cold, the feat was a remarkable 
one, especially when we remember that till quite 
recently the New York Zoo could not keep this 
species, though it is found wild in summer in then- 
grounds. 

It appears from some notes published in the 
"Avicultural Magazine" for December last, that 
from 1876 onwards quite a number of Humming- 
birds were imported into France, in one case 17 
out of 20 1 having lived for at least six years in a 
lady's possession, and in 1885 a French lady got 
two, which lived for a year — one of them even 
longer. Mr. Cholmondeby had a number in 
Shropshire in 1878, but they did not live long; and 
when their first Humming-bird was exhibited at 
our Zoo, a weak specimen of the Violet-ear (Peta- 
sophora iolata), presented by Captain A. Pam in 
1905, which only lived a fortnight, a dealer stated 
in the "Field" that he had imported the Horned 
Sun-gem (Heliactin cornutus) alive. 

Only as recently as 1907, Captain A. Pam 
brought quite a large consignment to our Zoo, in- 
cluding several species, none of which lived more 
than about two weeks, except two out of three 
specimens of Prevost's Humming-bird (Lampor- 
nis prevosti) one of which lived four, and the 
other five weeks — I am sure of this., for I paid par- 
ticular attention to them, and got laughed at by a 
distinguished aviculturist for doing so ! The Zoo 
Council decided Humming-birds were not worth 
going on with, and the French Zoos, in spite of 
French success, evidently were of the same 
opinion, as I have never seen or heard of any there; 
while as to the much-boomed German Zoos, they 
never seem to have tried their hands at Humming-- 
birds at all. 

Then, only a few years back, Mr, De Von 
brought a Humming-bird home from the West 
Indies; it did not live long, it is true, but it is 
worth noting that it had been reared from the 
nest. 

Mr. A. Ezra's two well-known specimens date 
back to rather less than two years ago; one is a 
specimen of the Garnet-throated Carib (Eulampis 
jugularis), received from a French amateur who 
had several species, and the other, obtained from 
a Continental dealer just before the war. a Ricord's 



Humming-bird (Sporadinus ricordij. Many of our 
readers must have seen these at the Horticultural 
Show in November, 1914 — the first occasion on 
which these little gems were known to have been 
shown at a bird-show; we believe both are alive 
and well at the time of writing, and Mr. Ezra has 
since obtained from his French correspondent a 
specimen of the Ruby-and-Topaz (Chrysolampis 
moxpitus), a pair of which species, by the way, 
formed part of the Zoo's consignment from Ven- 
ezuela. These birds have every chance of surviv- 
ing for years in Mr. Ezra's care, as that gentle- 
man has been so successful in keeping several 
species of Sun-birds, including the very delicate 
Amethyst-rumped species of India (Cinnyris zey- 
lonica). 

I was myself, as far as I know, the first to 
import this or any species of Sun-bird ; but my poor 
Amethyst arrived very sick, and died before I 
could get to London, while its companion, a Pur- 
ple Sun-bird (Cinnyris asiatica) got to the Zoo all 
right, and died there in a fortnight; it would prob- 
ably have lasted longer had it not been in moult 
when I started from India with it, so that it was 
not in good condition for the voyage; but it was 
the only one I could get just them, Purples being- 
far less common in Calcutta than Amethysts. This 
was in 1892:; then, during 1 the past ten years or so 
the Zoo. exhibited their first Sunbird, a hen of 
some African species, and Mr. J. D. Hamlyn 
brought home from South Africa a fine cock of 
the splendid Malachite Sun-bird, which was shortly 
after 1 exhibited — too soon, I fear, for though look- 
ing remarkably well when imported, its triumph 
cost it its life. During the period I am alluding- 
to, also, Mr. Ezra had an importation of six 
Amethyst-rumps from India, the whole number 
shipped surviving, and living some time after- 
wards, one for five years at least, a great winner 
when exhibited; I believe the only other one he 
kept is living still. 

Mr. Ezra has also had and still has several 
other Indian species, and some from Africa, in- 
cluding the splendid Malachite; the African kinds 
seem to be hardier than the Indian, of which the 
Purple is certainly far the easiest to keep; in Mr. 
Hamlyn 's establishment a cage-full lived nearly a 
year in the sitting-room. Humming-birds, how- 
ever, as a distinguished lady amateur remarked 
to me at the Show where the first was exhibited, 
make everything- else look common, and no doubt 
when things look up aviculturally after the war 
our English dealers will get plenty for those who 
can keep them. The essentials for their mainten- 
ance are really quite simple; they need warmth, 
becoming torpid like insects when chilled, and 
syrup alone will not keep them indefinitely, but 
must be mixed with something which will be a 
substitute for the little insects and spiders thev 
consume in addition to flower-nectar. Mr. Ezra's 
mixture of Mellin's Food, condensed milk, and 
honev, seemed to "fill the bill" admirably, but at 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



a pinch condensed milk alone would be better than 
simple sugar-syrup. 

I gave mv own Sun-birds condensed milk 
along with crushed biscuit and powdered yolk of 
hard-boiled egg, but the cold at sea was too much 
for the Amethyst even in June. Small though my 
success was, as I used it to encourage the impor- 
tation of these birds by others, I can, I think, 
fairly claim to have had, though indirectly, more 
to do with the revival of the importation of Hum- 
ming-birds than most people, as success with Sun- 
birds directly caused this. 



WORLD'S BIGGEST ELEPHANT 
DISCOVERED. 

How an accidental tumble led to the discovery 
of the remains of the largest elephant in the world 
has just come to light. The creature is known in 
scientific circles as "the Chatham Elephant," but 
it was on the outskirts of the little village of Up- 
nor, across the Medway, opposite the dockyard 
town, that the bones of the enormous mammoth 
were unearthed. 

The credit for the discovery belongs to a 
skilled labourer in the dockyard, named Syd Tur- 
ner, who lives at Nelson Terrace, Luton, Chat- 
ham, and to a representative of "Lloyd's Ntws" 
he has given an account of the remarkably for- 
tuitous circumstances under which he found the 
elephant. 

"It was on a Sunday morning' in the latter 
end of August, 1913," he said, "that, whilst on 
one of my rambles in search of ancient stone tools 
and implements and similar objects of archaeolo- 
gical interest, I went to Upnor. The village had 
been very unproductive hitherto from the point 
of view of mv hobby, and had scarce repaid me 
for my walks in the neighbourhood — just a few 
worked stones which constituted slight evidence 
of man's work, and denoted the existence of a 
coarse and rude culture. 

While I was roaming about it came on to rain, 
and I took shelter in the undergrowth which oc- 
curs on the hills there. In so doing I fell into a 
small, shallow trench which had been dug by a 
party of Royal Engineers. The trench was from 
18in. to 2ft. deep, and about 2ft. wide; at some 
points it had fallen in, and weeds were growing 
up everywhere, pointing to the fact thai it had 
been excavated some months previously. 

MISTOOK BONES FOR TREE ROOTS. 

"Well, here I sat down to shelter from the 
rain. I drew out my pipe and lit it, and started 



puffing away, at the same time casually began to 
survey my surroundings. I noticed what appeared 
to be the root of a tree which had been cut through 
on one side of the trench; the same feature was 
visible upon the opposite side. I bent down to 
examine it more closely, and was delighted to find 
that my first: impression was wrong' and that the 
'roots' were, in reality, large bones, some of which 
had been cut in the digging of the trench. 

" It dawned upon me that here were the bones 
and tusk of what was possibly a mammoth ! 

"Remains of these prehistoric monsters, are 
fairly numerous in the Chatham locality, especial- 
ly in the brick earths in the suburb of Luton. 
Many isolated bones and fragments of tusk have 
been found at various times, but as soon as they 
are exposed to the air they crumble away and 
lose their value. It would appear that in the 
earth about Chatham there is some preservative 
which keeps the bones intact as long as they are 
covered, and the greatest caution is necessary if 
they are to be brought out intact. 

" I managed to dig up one of the bones and 
took it home. Several of my friends to whom I 
showed it expressed the opinion that it belonged 
to some huge animal now extinct. I did 1 not re- 
veal the precise spot where I had discovered it, 
and I wrote to a number of institutions, finally 
getting into touch with the authorities of the 
Natural History Museum at South Kensington. 
The latter immediately invited me to send up to 
them for inspection the bone I had in my posses- 
sion. 

" I complied, and in due course received an 
intimation from them that it was one of the toe 
bones, of a mammoth, and they asked me if there 
were much more of it where I had excavated this 
relic. Without disclosing the spot where the bones 
lay I replied to all their questions. 

"After a lengthy correspondence, it was ar- 
ranged that I should meet Dr. C. W. Andrews, of 
the Museum, and take him to the scene. On Nov- 
ember 3rd of that year he came down to Chatham, 
and, in a car placed at our disposal by Dr. Cotman 
and Dr. Taylor — two local medical men both of 
whom accompanied us — I conducted him to* the 
trench which contained what has proved to be the 
remains of the largest elephant in the world." 

A NINE-FOOT TUSK. 

Mr. Turner, who is a native of Lulon, near 
Chatham, has worked for over seventeen years in 
the dockyard as a skilled labourer. It is very 
rare to find a case of "a working-man" who has 
made a hobby of such an abstruse study as geo- 
logy and archaeology, with their kindred branches 
of research. "In a geological aspect," declared 
Mr. Turner, "what I don't know about the locali- 
ty is not worth knowing. I was first led to study 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



it by a lecture delivered by Mr. Bennett, of Mail- 
ing, concerning prehistoric Kent, and havei con- 
tinued to occupy myself with researches in. this 
respect ever since. From the stone implements 
and tools which I have picked up in my rambles I 
believe that primitive man was very numerous in 
the locality." 

The delicate labour of excavating the remains 
of the mammoth were pursued during the past 
summer by Dr. Andrews, with the assistance of a 
specialist attached to the museum, who is an ex- 
pert in dealing with ancient discoveries of this 
character. As each relic was uncovered, it was 
coated with plaster of Paris, and removed to a 
building close by, some of the bones being im- 
mense, and as many as four men being required 
to lift the shoulder-blade on to a truck for trans- 
port. The toe-bone dug out by Mr. Turner was 
5Jin. by 10|in. , and some of the other measure- 
ments confirm the experts in the belief that the 
animal stood about 15ft. high, with tusks — one of 
which has been excavated uninjured — 9ft. long. 

(The "Illustrated London News," January 8th, 
1916, has most interesting sketches and pho- 
tographs of the World's Biggest Elephant. — 
Ed.) 



FURTHER REMINISCENCES OF 
OLD-TIME SHOWMEN. 

By A. H. Paterson. 

Your photo of old showmen is most interest- 
ing. I call to mind a number of them. I should 
imagine you have a lot of photographs of such a 
crowd that you could run a series of them — say 
one or two a month, with about lfJi or 12l lines of 
copy, just enough to say who they were — with 
birth and death — the show they ran, and one or 
two* hints at events that stood out in their history. 

Talking of menageries ! I can well remember 
the last half dozen shows that occasionally wan- 
dered into East Norfolk. First of all these was 
Edmond's with the magnificent show of horses — 
great huge beasts, with 20 milk-white horses 
to draw the elephant van alone. It was an event 
when they came, talked of weeks before, and a 
fortnight or so after. When it was known they 
were on the 20 mile grind from Norwich to Yar- 
mouth, sporting fellows drove half way to meet 
the show. One, named Drake, a menagerie-mad 
fellow, used to go with a heap ipf stuff in a sack 
to' escort the elephant. His rooms were decorated 
with pictures of animals, and a great litho of Man- 
der's interior hang over the bed-rails. Drovesmen 



and bandsmen and others were regularly feted. 
The band in the Market drew thousands to hear it; 
and the top-hatted bandsmen took themselves very 
seriously. The last waggon always came in with 
a condemned horse behind, round which we boys 
marched in an awe-stricken picket, talking in 
whispered accents about " it being for the lions to 
eat!" 

In 1868 came Mander's magnificent show with 
a rhinoceros, 3 giraffes, and the great Blue-faced 
Mandrill, "captured specially for this show — in 
Abyssinia." This was while the Abyssinian war 
was on. The horses were magnificent; the show 
great. It came to or three years after, a wreck — 
nearly all the horses had died with some mange- 
like disease — it might have been glanders, but I 
forget. And the show built up without a front ! — 
it had been distrained for rent at Norwich. Man- 
ders went the same way his predecessor Hvlton 
died — drink and trouble. 

In 1872 came the nobliest little menagerie of 
the time — Day's Crystal Palace Menagerie, with 8 
waggons and a living waggon. The great feature 
was "Daniel in the Lions Den" — young Dan. Day 
(whom I afterwards saw in Preston in 1884 with a 
decaying show, the chief attraction to me was a 
sick lioness) as a child rode round on Wallace in 
its den. Another feature was a nigger in a coal 
sack who went and boxed and wrestled with a big 
bear — it was a picturesque gag, and to us boys 
a huge gladiatorial display. In 1875 this show 
came again, no larger, but more gaudy. The 
paintings on panels outside were delightfully 
bright and well painted — I think by some one in 
Gloucester. They were real works of art, worthy 
of a genuine artist. Day never came this way 
again. 

Then there were the Bostocks (usually No. 1). 
Old Lady Bostock, plump and pleasant, I admired 
as the Menagerie Queen. I was so eager for show 
work that when but a lad I made up friendly to 
her, and might have been taken on as monkey-bow 
But father's foot was too big" to get away from. 
Old Jack (I think it was), the elephant, was very 
truculent at times, making his keeper stand in 
awe of him — or bolt. No one dare go near the 
pachyderm save Mrs. B., who would waddle up 
into the van, Jack flapping his ears, either in res- 
pect or salutation, or well-feigned terror, while 
she put a chain on his leg, and then he'd stand 
still while she bobbed under his belly and came 
out puffing, theatening- him with dire vengeance 
if he didn't behave himself. Then as< I grew older 
the show came less and less, occasionally with 
three or four years intervals. When it came it was 
working south for the Agricultural Hall at London. 
Always in damp rotten weather, and the usual 
thing was for the sound of pouring rain on the 
canvas outside, and streams running across the 
middle inside, over the hard ground on which the 
show pitched. 



HAMLVN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Hamlgit's 0Ltm%zxu JKaga^tiu. 

Published on the 15th of each month. 



Editorial and Business Office (pro tem) : — 

221, ST. GEORGE'S STREET, LONDON, E. 
Telephone: Avenue 6341. 
Telegrams : " Hamlyn, London Docks, London." 

Advertisement Rates, very reasonable, on application. 



The Editor will be glad to receive for publication articles 
and all interesting photos, the imports and exports of all 
stoclc, and foreign adventures with all wild stock. The 
subscription is fc'/- per ann., or 6d. per copy, post free, 
which will be sent under cover. 



The way the animals were arranged seldom 
varied. Entering on the left (as in your photo) the 
first was the living waggon. Then Bird van 
Xo. 1, No. 2 the Monkeys, No. 3' the small carni- 
vores and pigs (civets, etc); No. 4, Antelope, Zeb- 
ras or other herbrides; then the bigger things, as 
a Buffalo or small Elephant. The middle van was 
tenanted, left side (as you looked), by Zebra or 
Yak, or some big thing; middle, Elephant; right 
(facing), Llamas or Kangaroos. "Passing on to 
the next cage," Lions, of sorts; next, Tigers; next, 
Performing Lions; next, Leopards; next Bears 
and Hyaenas; and, curiously enough, if they had 
a Polar Bear they'd stick him next the Lions ! 

But, of course, Zoos damned the travelling 
shows, and they had to pick up the skeletons of 
the departing circuses and combine the two. 



EXPECTED BIRTH OF AN ELEPHANT 
IN EUROPE. 

Dr. Dreyer, Zoological Gardens, Copenha- 
gen, writes under date December 6th : — 

" I shall be pleased if you will book the 
Zoological Gardens, Copenhagen, as a subscri- 
ber to 'Hamlyn's Menagerie Magazine.' 

" Perhaps your numerous readers would 
like to know that we are expecting quite an in- 
teresting event here in the Gardens. 

"Our female elephant, 'Ellen,' is going 
to have her third calf. This is quite a unique 
case of a female elephant bearing three babies 
in captivity, and I feel sure it will be of great 
interest to the readers of your Magazine. 

I shall, perhaps, later write you particulars 
of this interesting event." 

We shall be delighted to have a full report; 
also a photograph of mother and calf shortly after 
birth. Some years ago a calf was born in the 
Zoological Gardens, Regents Park, but did not 
survive. It was the property of Mr. John Sanger, 
being one of his famous troupe of performing ele- 
phants. The male, "Palm," was destroyed some 
time back. 



ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF 
IRELAND. 

The Council met on Saturday, Sir R. N. 
Woods (Vice-President) presiding. Also present 
—Prof. G. H. Carpenter (Hon. Sec), Dr. M' 
Dowel Cosgrave (Hon. Treasurer), W. E. Pee- 
bles, Esq., Dr. G. A. K. Ball, M. F. Headlam, 
Esq., Prof. Scott, Dr. Scriven. 

Visitors to the Gardens during the Christ- 
mas holidays brought the usual amount of dain- 
ties with them for their special pets. The chim- 
panzees came in for a good share, given by per- 
mission of the keeper. Formerly, before these 
specimens were protected by the glass screen from 
an indiscriminating public, they were frequently 
given injurious goodies, which were anything but 
beneficial to their well-being. Now that is altered, 
and it is quite amusing to see the small-sized 
chimp, known to frequenters as "Charlie," rap on 
the glass to draw attention to his needs, and then 
turn round to the wire door in the inner passage 
leading to his cage, as much as to say, "There's 
the way in," and he immediately on the slightest 
move towards the passage door rushes to the wire 
opening where he stretches out a hand for the ex- 
pected dainty. " Empress," who inhabits the same 
compartment, looks on in disdain from the lofty 
top cross-beam, and only sometimes condescends 
to come slowly down, as if it were beneath the 
dignity of a gorilla to come when called. " George" 
who lives next door, gets very annoyed if he is 
left out in the cold, and makes his anger known 
by shaking the wire door for all his worth until 
some notice is taken of him. The gibbon has been 
recently quartered in the cage looking into the 
general monkey house, and is seen to greater 
advantage, and also attracts many admirers by its 
graceful motion and peculiar voice, which rises 
to so high a pitch. 



REGIMENTAL PETS AT THE ZOO. 

There are at present at the Zoo, deposited 
for safe custody, two sets of regimental pets — four 
bears belonging to the Canadians and four black 
buck or Indian antelopes belonging to the Royal 
Warwickshire Regiment. They are lodging next 
to one another in most comfortable quarters with 
a view over Regent's Park— the bears on the 
Mappin Terrace and the buck in a roomy pen 
immediately below them. 

The four bears are of different sizes and ages, 
all black and all most engaging. They were 
caught as cubs in Canada, and are respectively 
the mascots of the Second Infantry Brigade, the 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Divisional Ammunition Park, and the 8th and 
10th Batteries of the 2nd Brigade of the 1st 
Canadian Contingent. As companions in their 
cage they have one Syrian bear and one brown 
bear. 

The Warwickshire's black buck are pretty 
little creatures with spiral horns and spindle legs 
and sentimental eyes. They cast timid, pathetic 
glances at the few passers-by, and made appeal- 
ing- little noises in their throats, Avhich sounded 
rather greedy. A very little attention, we felt, if 
tactfully paid, would have made friends of them 
for life. 



BOXING DAY IN LONDON. 

The following figures show the attendances 
at various resorts in London : — ■ 



Zoological Gardens 

Kew Gardens 

British Museum ... 

Science Museum, South Kensington. 



3,854 
3,000 
2,797 
2,615 



JAMRACH'S. 

(Continued from No. 8.) 

Passing from the back of this little room, we 
enter a very large one, extending from the front 
to* the back of the entire premises, with a gallery 
on three sidesi above. Here we are joined by the 
younger Mr. Jamrach, and here we stand amid the 
most bewildering multitude of bric-a-brac and 
quaint valuables ever jumbled together : fantastic 
gods and godesses, strange arms and armour, 
wonderful carvings in ivory, and pricelessi gems, 
of old Japanese pottery. Merely to enumerate in 
the baldest way a tenth part of these things would 
fill this paper, and briefly to describe a hundredth 
part would fill the Magazine. And when we ex- 
press our wonder at the extent of the collection, 
we are calmly informed that this is only a part- — 
there are more about the building — four or five 
roomfuls or so' ! 

We have come to St. George's Street expect- 
ing "toi see nothing but a zoological warehouse, 
and all this is a surprise. That such a store as we 
now see were hidden away in Shadwell would have 
seemed highly improbable, and indeed we are 
told that very few people are aware of its exist- 
ence. "The museums know us, however," says 
Mr. Jamrach the younger, "and many of their 
chicf treasures have come from this place." Among 



the few curious visitors who have found their way 
to Jamrach 's there has been the Prince of Wales, 
who stayed long, and left much surprised, and 
pleased at all he had seen. The late Frank Buck- 
land, too, whose whole-souled passion for natural 
history took him to this establishment day after 
day, often for all day, could rarely resist the fas- 
cination of the museum, even while his beloved 
animals growled in the adjacent lairs. The Jam- 
rach 's do not push the sale of this bric-a-brac, and 
seem to love to keep the strange things about 
them.. Their trade is in animals, and their deal- 
ing's in arms and curiosities form almost a hobby. 
Many of the beautiful pieces of pottery have stood 
here thirty years, and their proud possessors seem 
in no great anxiety to part with them, now. A 
natural love of the quaint and beautiful first led 
Mr. Jamrach to buy carvings and shells from the 
sea-faring men who brought him his birds and 
monkeys, so that these men soon were led to re- 
gard his warehouse as the regulation place of dis- 
posal for any new or old thing- from across the 
seas; and so sprang up this overflowing museum. 

Among hundreds of idols we are shown three 
which are especially noteworthy. The first is a 
splendid life-sized Buddha — a work of surprising- 
grace and art. The god is represented as sitting, 
his back being screened by a great shell of the 
purest design. The whole thing is heavily gilt, 
and is set, in places, with jewels. Every line is a 
line of grace, and the features, while of a distinct 
Hindoo cast, beam with a most refined mildness. 
What monetary value Mr. Jamrach sets on this 
we do 1 not dare to ask; and, indeed, we are now 
placed before the second of the three — a Vishnu 
carved in alto-relievo of some hard black wood. 
This is a piece of early Indian art, and it has a 
history. It was fished up some twenty years ago 
from the bottom of the River Krishna, where it 
had been reverently deposited by its priests to 
save it from insult and mutilation at the hands of 
the invading Mohammedan; and there it had lain 
for eight hundred years. It is undamaged, with 
the exception that the two more prominent of the 
four arms are broken off; and that it has escaped 
the insult which its devout priests feared is testi- 
fied by the fact that the nose — straight, delicate, 
and almost European in shape — has not been 
broken. It is an extremely rare thing for a 
Vishnu free from this desecration — a fatal one in 
the eyes of worshippers — to be seen in this coun- 
try. Above the head are carved medallions repre- 
senting the ten incarnations of the god, for the 
last of which mighty avatars millions still devoutly 
wait in mystic India; while here, in Ratcliff High- 
way, after, all its dark adventures, and after its 
eight centuries of immersion below the Krishna, 
stands the embodiment of the god himself, mildly 
serene and meekly dignified. 

The third of these gods is quite a different 
person. There is nothing- resembling beauty — 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



either of conception or workmanship — about him. 
He is very flat-chested, and his form is faithfully 
represented in the accompanying illustration; with- 
out an illustration he would be indescribable. The 
head is very small, and grotesquely carved, with 
a large boar's tusk projecting from the jaw. The 
trunk and limbs, however, are the parts of inter- 
est; they consist of an entire human skin stretched 
on a sort of flat wooden framework, and partly 
stuffed with dried grasses. The skin is a light 
brown, leathery looking stuff, with here and there 
a small crack. The legs are clothed with loose 
blue trousers, which appear to be of dungaree, or 
a similar material, and the complete deity came 
from the Friendly Islands some time since. Just 
at his feet lie, in an open packing box, certain 
mummified heads, some bearing unmistakable 
marks of hard knocks, all having been, no doubt, 
among the most cherished possessions of the gen- 
tlemen who had separated them from the shoulders 
upon which they originally grew. 

Of heads and skulls we see many, and among 
them the skull of an undoubted cannibal — a thing- 
of very peculiar conformation. And so we go on 
from room to room, where the sunlight peeps in 
with difficulty, and paints with light and shadow 
the memorials of savage art, warfare and worship, 
as well as many exjuisite specimens of porcelain 
and metal work from Japan and Florence. We 
see the garment of cowtails which Ketchwayo 
wore when taken prisoner, and we see a testimony 
to the guile of the wily Maori in an axe made of 
iron only, but painted and got up to exactly re- 
semble greenstone. The reason of the disguise 
becomes apparent when it is explained that for the 
genuine greenstone article of this pattern a collec- 
tor will gladly pay a hundred pounds, while the 
metal imitation is worth its weight as old iron, 
and no more. We see two pairs of magnificent 
china vases five or six feet high, the like of which 
It would be difficult to find offered for sale any- 
where. Another pair, which had stood here for 
thirty years, were bought only a week or two 
back by a visitor of title with a cheque lor three 
figures — a bargain which the buyer jumped at. 

We arc shown old Satsuma ware of wondrous 

delicacj and richness, commanding something 

more than its weight in sovereigns in the market. 
We sec grand old repousce work in very high 

relief. We linger over a singular old Japanese 
medicine cabinet, the outside ol which is covered 
with hundreds ol" little silver charms, against as 
many varieties of disease — each charm a quaintly- 
wrought oval or SCarabaeus. We examine two 
immense Japanese vases of copper, each six feet 
high, and ol the most elaborate workmanship, the 

design revealing here and there, in a surprising 
manner, elementary forms and principles usually 
Supposed to be wholly and originally Greek. There 
are stone weapons, bronze weapons, steel wea- 



pons, and wooden weapons of every outlandish 
sort, and musical instruments such as one sees 
represented on Egyptian sculptures. There are 
many things bought at the sale of the effects of 
the late king of Oude, an enthusiastic old gentle- 
man whose allowance from the British Govern- 
ment was a lac of rupees a month, and who man- 
aged to spend it all, and more than all, on curiosi- 
ties and works of art, so that his funeral was 
followed by a sale on behalf of his creditors. 
Among the old king's treasures in this place are 
seven small figures, of a dancing bear, a buck 
antelope, a gladiator, a satyr riding a furious 
bull, another riding a camel, an armed man on a 
rhinoceros, and a monkey mounted on a goat, 
respectively. Each of these little figures is built 
up of innumerable smaller figures of beasts, birds, 
and fishes, fighting and preying upon each other, 
not one speck of the whole surface belonging to 
the main representation, while, nevertheless, the 
whole produces the figure complete with its every 
joint, muscle, sinew, and feature. And so we pass, 
by innumerable sacred masks, pashas' tails and 
alligators' skulls, toward the other and main de- 
partment of this remarkable warehouse — that 
devoted to natural history. 

We cross Britten's Court, where we observe 
a van with a small crowd of boys collected about 
it. A crane is swung out from a high floor, and 
from the end of the dependent chain hangs a 
wooden case or cage, violently agitated bv the 
movements of the active inhabitant. He is a 
black panther, the most savage sort of beast with 
which Mr. Jamrach has to deal, and, as this one 
feels himself gradually rising through the air, 
his surprise and alarm manifest themselves in an 
outburst strongly reminding the spectator of Mark 
Twain's blown-up cat "a-snorting, and a-clawing, 
and a-reaching- for things like all possessed." He 
arrives at his appointed floor at last, however, and, 
as the cage is swung- in, the blazing eyes and 
gleaming teeth turn from our side toward the 
attendant who receives him. 

The wide doors on the ground floor are swung 
open, and we enter a large apartment fitted with 
strong iron-barred cages on all sides. This is the 
lowest of three floors, similarly fitted, in which is 
carried on a trade in living creatures which is 
known from one end of the earth to the other. 
Jamrach \s is the market for wild animals from all 
the world over, and whatever a menagerie-kceper 
or a zoological collection may want, from an ele- 
phant to an Angora cat, can be had in response 
to an order sent here. Whatever animal a man 
may have to sell, here he max sell it, providing 
that it be in good and healthy condition. Mr. 
Jamrach has lived a lifetime among - his beasts, 
and has had his troubles and adventures with 
them. 

To be continued. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

That one of the larger operations undertaken in 
the laying out of the Scottish Zoological Park 
at Corstorphine was an enclosure for brown and 
black bears, designed, on the lines which the 
Park has now made familiar, to allow the bears 
to be seen under as natural conditions as possi- 
ble. The work on this enclosure was commenced 
two years ago, but owing to the necessity of 
devoting all available funds to more urgent re- 
quirements, it could not be completed at that 
time. For some months past, and especially 
since the arrival of the two very fine brown 
bears, which were presented to the Society last 
autumn, the completion of the enclosure had be- 
come a matter of great urgency. Work on it 
was accordingly resumed, and it has now been 
finished, so that the brown bears, which have 
had to be confined to their cages for some weeks 
will again be exhibited in the enclosure on New 
Year's Day. 

The enclosure is in principle' similar to that 
prepared for the polar bears. It is of considera- 
ble area, and consists in the main of a mass 
of rock-work, rising to a considerable height in 
the centre and falling away at the sides. Several 
tree trunks with stout branches are set in the 
concrete, and these, together with the irregular 
rock-work, supply abundant opportunity for the 
brown bears to exhibit their natural activity and 
playfulness. On the southern side, round which 
the path for visitors passes, is a pool. 



That a Derbyshire rat catcher, John Gaunt, claims 
to be the only man in this country who has 
trained foxes to work with ferrets. 



That I am expecting shortly a collection of African 
birds from the Senegal district. I append here- 
with French and English names which will 
doubtless interest amateurs in general : — 

joues oranges orange-cheek Waxbill 

bees de corail... common African Waxbill 

ventre orange African zebra Waxbill 

cou coupes Cut throat 

cordons bleus Crimson-cared Waxbill 

amaranthes Fire Finch 

nonnes Little pied Grassfinch 

veuves Paradise Whydah 

combassaus Combason 

iguicolors Orange Bishop 

mozambiques Mozambique Siskin 

travailleurs Red-beaked Weaver bird 

bees de plomb Silverbill 

chanteur Grey Singing Finch 

gris bleu Lavender Finch 



That the arrivals in Liverpool are Amazon Par- 
rots, Conures, Blue-winged Love-birds, with 
general South American small birds. The West 
African arrivals have been very few. The old 
traders are adverse to speculating in these dan- 
gerous times. 



That Peach-faced Love-birds continue to arrive 
from Portugal. These birds will soon revert to 
their old prices, 30/- to 35/- pair. The African 
Red-faced still maintains a high price, the arri- 
vals being very few. 



That the arrivals in London have been 2 Secre- 
tary Cranes, 4 Stanley Cranes, 3 Vervet Mon- 
keys, 8 Chacma Baboons, 1 Tricolor Parrot, 4 
Marmozets, 10 Mongoose, 1 Senegal Baboon, 
200 Budgerigars, 1 Mynah, 200 Senegal 
Finches, with other odds and ends. 



That the Bird-eating Spiders are of great interest. 

Mr. Gerald Rattigan writes on the 7th inst : — 

"Spider arrived safely. It is a splendid 

"specimen, and I am very pleased with it. It 

"appears none the worse for the journey. Its 

"living cage is unique." 



That "Gilbert" arrived last week from the Conak- 
ry district, West Africa. "Gilbert" is a young 
male chimpanzee of the dark masked variety, 
with dark markings as far as. the knuckles on 
each hand. His education has commenced. He 
promises to turn out a fairly respectable young 
man chimpanzee. Already feeds at table. He 
has so far strong objections to clothing the lower 
extremities of his interesting dark hairy body. 
Still I have every hope of his wearing trousers 
shortly. He is for sale at a reasonable figure. 
Absolutelv tame with anv one — man, woman or 
child. 

That, after two years, I have .received a consign- 
ment of North American Grey Squirrels ex s.s. 
"Minnehaha." For prices sec list. 



To the Editor of " Hamlyn's Menagerie Magazine. 
Sir, 

The verses you quote in your December 
Magazine are a variation of what was said in 
Russia during the Russo-Japanese War. The 
Russian opinion of the Japs was as follows : — 
Fleurs sans odeur, 
Femmes sans pudeur, 
Hommes sans honeur. 
Flowers without scent, 
Women without modesty, 
Men without honour. 

COSMOPOLITAN. 



Printed by W. J. Hasted & Son , (T.U.), 306, Mile End Road, London, E. 



The Manager, 

HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE 

I herewith enclose you the sum of Ten Shillings, being twelve months' subscriptions 
to your Magazine, commencing 15th May, 1916-17. 

Signed _____^ 

A d dress 

Date 1916. 



WILLSON'S LIVE STOCK PROVIDERS, Ltd., 

137, New Oxford Street, London, W.C. 
Telephone— Gerrard, 7708. Telegrams— Highbred Westcent, London. Bankers— London County & Westminster. 



LONDON'S CHIEF EMPORIUM FOR DOGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

11 our adult dogs are sold on 14 days' trial on condition that if not liked they will be 
exchanged for livestock to value from our stock within this period. 

All our Dogs are daily inspected by a Qualified Veterinary Surgeon. 
.A. VISIT IS RESPECTFULLY ZE^JEC^UIESTEID- 



E. W. LITTLE, F.z.s., 

Practical Naturalist and Taxidermist. 



SPECIALIST IN BIG GAME TROPHIES 
AND FISH MOUNTING- 

Studios: 65, YORK STREET, BAKER STREET, W. 



PADD1NQT0N 6903. 



LONDON. 



GREY SQUIRRELS for Sale. 

Direct from North America, per S.S. "Minnehaha. 

FEMALES, 20/6. 32/6 pair. 

SAFE DELIVERY GUARANTEED. 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 221, St. Georges Street, 



LONDON, EAST. 



p 



-9 



Hamlyns 
Menagerie 



Magazine. 







No. lO.-Vol. 1. 



FEBRUARY, 1916. 



CONTENTS 



INTRODUCTORY 

"THE WATER ELEPHANT"... 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

CHARLES JAMRACH ... 

BIRD LIFE IN REGENT'S PARK 

SKUNK FARMS IN AMERICA 

ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND 

ELEPHANT'S WAR WORK 

HISTORY OF THE GOULDIAN FINCH 
GENERAL NOTES 



6* 



Telegrams : Hamlyn, London Docks, London. 



Telephone : 6341 Avenub 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East. 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station. 

Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence five minutes walk. 
P.O.O. payable at Leman Stveet, East. Cheques crossed " London County &■ Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TERMS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from time of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back. TELEPHONE. — Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS. — Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIVERY. — Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

For the arrivals from abroad during the past month. Full Particulars are given in "General Notes. 



Chimpanzees : — 

" Gilbert,'' male, 30 inches high, between 2 and 3 years old. 
Absolutely tame with anyone. An exceptionally fine animal. 
Every week he increases in weight and price. Fully dressed. 
At liberty. 
" Phillip," male, 30 inches high, 2J years old. This animal was 
born with a club-foot, stands up and walks well. Remarkable 
healthy specimen. If perfect its value would be £60. Price £30. 
" Zoe," female, 26 inches high, 16 months old. Suitable for home 
pet. Fully dressed. At liberty in house. Price £30. 

Note.— Professor Keith, from The Royal College of Sur- 
geons, Lincoln Inns Fields, fully examined the above three 
Chimpanzees on Saturday, 5th February. He expressed 
unbounded admiration for these three specimens. They are 
all of different types, also from different localities. His re- 
marks will appear in the March Magazine. Offers are not 
requested for these animals, 
Group of 7 Blue Foxes and 1 White Fox, imported direct from 
Northern Europe. The owner advises me as follows: — "We 
have sold our Blue Foxes before the War for £20 each. We 
have paid ourselves £7 and £8 each. The Blue Fox-pelts are 
here worth up to £22 each." I vouch for the accuracy of the 
above statement. I prefer to sell them in one lot. Price on 
application. 

North American Grey Squirrels (Sciurus cinereus. 

Females 25/6. Males 20/6. 
After two years delay, I have received a consignment of these 
well known pets. Grey Squirrels thrive in all our London Parks, 
and the various Zoological Gardens. They can be sent safely 
packed, and delivery guaranteed. Early application requested. 
12 Canadian Black White Skunks (Mephitis 

mephitica) ... ... ... ... each 80/6 

These take the place of the Indian Mongoose for rats and 
all vermin. They are entirely devoid of any objectionable 
smell, the scent bacs being. abstracted. The only Skunks at 
present for sale in Great Britain. 
African saddle backed Jackals. Each 70/6. 

These are the largest Jackals ever I have imported. 3 Males, 
2 Females, all in sound condition. 
1 South African Chacma Baboon, female, good 
size, been Mascot on a Transport Steamer, 
very tame ... ... ... ... £9 

4 Mandrill Baboons, from Congo district, males each £8 

1 Schmidt Monkey, very fine speimen ... ... £5 

1 Mangahey Monkey, white eyelids, white breast £4 

12 Senegal Baboons, various sizes ... each 80/6 to 100/- 

1 Grivet Monkey, large specimen ... ... 60/6 

100 Indian Rhesus Monkeys to arrive shortly. 

2 Meercats, from South Africa... ... ... each 60/6 

2 Mongooses, from India ... ... ... ,, 

(These are for Rats and all Vermin) 
1 Raccoon, medium size ... ... ... only 

1 Japanese Bear, male, 2 yenrs old ... ... ,, 

1 Porcupine, from East Africa ... ... ... ,, 

1 male, adult, Blessbok (Oamaliscus albifrons), in 
sound, healthy condition, first direct importa- 
tion for years. Very low price 



40/6 

50/6 
£16 

£7 



80/6 



1 Red Deer Stag, 2 years old ... 

2 pairs Secretary Cranes. Prices on application. 
2 ,, Stanley ,, ,, 
2 Australian Emus, very fine ... ... ... each £12 

(These are adult splendid birds, been outdoors 2 years.) 

1 Australian Black Swan, female ... ... 80/6 

12 White Swans, females ... ... 25/-, males 20/- 

4 Jungle Fowls cocks 10/6 hens 12/6 pair 20/6 

2 Muscovy Ducks 

3 Mallards ... 
1 Hen Common Pheasant 

3 Talking African Grey Parrots in cages 

1 ,, Blue Buff Macaw, very fine ... 

4 Blue-fronted Amazons, very tame 

2 White-fronted 
2 Petzs Conures 
2 Red-fronted Conures 
2 Brown-throated Conures 
15 Red-headed Pope Cardinals, very fine 
4 Glossy Cow Birds — males 
2 „ ,, hens 

1 Saffron Finch 

2 Whydahs, hens 

3 Ruficauda Finches ... 
20 Yellow Budgerigars 
30 Green 

3 pairs Chilo Wigeon ... 
2 ,, ,, Pintail ... 

1 ,, Bahamas 
2\ ,, Red Crested Pochards ... 

2 ,, African Triangular Spotted Doves 
2 Roseate Cockatoos, tame 
2 Lemon Crested Cockatoos, tame 

The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at The Zoologi 
c'al Society's Gardens, Regents Park, London : 
2 ,, Alligators, 3£ feet each 

2 ,, King Snakes 

3 Hardwickes Mastigure (Uromastix hardwickii) 
6 Boa Constrictors, 6 to 8 feet ... ... e 

4 Cooks Tree Boas (Corallus cookii) 
3 Thick-necked Tree Boas (Epicrates cenchris) ... 

2 Banded Tailed Tree Snakes (Leptophis liocercus) 
6 Angulated Snakes (Helicops angulatus) 

3 Giant Toads (Bufo marinus) ... 
8 Bird-eating Spiders (Avicularia avicularia) 

(Extraordinary specimens, seldom imported.) 
2 Gigantic Centepedes (Scolopendra gigantea) ... 

Sea Lions.— To arrive from California in April— May, Six young 
Males. I have these ordered, still I am open to book for 
delivery others if ordered immediately. 

Polar Bears.— Four under order. Will be sent as they arrive. 
Prices on application. 

Very Large Chimpanzees.— Just as I am going to press, 
letter received from West Africa, Conakry district, offering two 
very large Chimpanzees. They are on collar and chain. P 
ticulars on application. 



each 


10/6 


,, 


5/- 




5/6 


£7 to £10 ea< 




£5 


each 


£2 


,, 


30/6 


pair 


25/6 


,, 


20/6 


,, 


20/6 


each 


7/6 


,, 


7/6 


,, 


5/6 




7/6 


„ 


7/6 


" 


16/6 
6/- 


pair 


4/- 

50/6 


,, 


50/6 


,, 


60/6 


,, 


50/6 




30/6 


each 


22/- 


,, 


32/- 


rhe Zoologi- 




70/6 


,, 


25/6 


each 


10/6 


ach 50/- 


60/- 


each 


30/- 


,, 


30/- 




30/- 


each 


25/- 


,, 


12/6 


.. 


20/6 



12/6 



Hamlin's JEotagerk Jttaga^ta. 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 10.— Vol. 1. 



LONDON, FEBRUARY, 1916. 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

List of Subscribers, Jan. 11th to Feb. 11th. 
H. E. Harcourt- Vernon, 15, Clifton Crescent, 

Folkestone. 
A. Steele, 47, Roxburgh Street, Kelso. 
Miss M. Staniland, Hussey House, Boston. 
Reginald Cory, Duffryn House, Swansea. 
H. A. French, St. Margaret's, Downs Park 

Street, Bristol. 
H. R. Blackburn, Woodlands, Preston, Brighton. 



By arrangement with Messrs. W. H. Smith 
& Son, 186, Strand, W.C., "Hamlyn's Menagerie 
Magazine" is on sale on the 16th of each month 
at the following Railway Stations : — 

Charing Cross (South Eastern and Chatham 
Railway). 

King's Cross (Great Northern Railway). 

Liverpool Street (Great Eastern Railway). 

St. Pancras (Midland Railway). 

Victoria (South Eastern and Chatham Rail- 
way). 

Waterloo (South Western Railway). 



The subscription for Vol. I., Nos. 1 to 12, is 
6/- post free. All subscriptions commence with 
No. 1. The price of this February Number is 1/-, 
post free. 

* * * * 

I have still a few December numbers for sale, 
1/-, post free. This contains the reproduction of 
a photograph taken at a Menagerie Sale in 1896. 

The conclusion of the " Settc Cama Recollec- 
tions," containing the native description of the 
supposed Water Elephant, will appear in the 
March number. 

Several very interesting old Menagerie Show 
Bills will be reprinted, some 100 years old. 



Many interesting reproductions of old photo- 
graphs will appear from time to time. I have a 
collection of several hundred. 



I am sorry that certain readers take exception 
to some remarks made concerning a late well- 
known and highly respected lady in the January 
number. Such an innuendo was quite uncalled 
for; it certainly escaped my notice when reading 
the manuscript, and I am grieved it was pub- 
lished. 



Advertisements are inserted at very reason- 
able rates. 



If you have not already sent in your 6/- sub- 
scription, might I respectfully ask you to do so? 
JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



" THE WATER ELEPHANT." 

Sir Harry Johnston, G.CjM.G., K.C»B., 
writes from St. John's Priorv, Poling, 27th Janu- 
ary, 1916 : — 

St. John's Priory, 

Poling, nr. Arundel. 

27th Jan., 1916. 
To the Editor of " Hamlyn's Magazine." 
Sir, 

I should like lo say that I have been increas- 
ingly interested in the information given in your 
Magazine, and trust that the venture will be a 
successful and a permanent one. 

I observe that a writer is lo give information 
in your pages on the stories of Water-elephants, 
I do not know what line he will take, or whether 
he will lend strength to the supposition that in 
the stories of "Water-elephants" we have the 
indication of the concealed existence in the swamps 
of Western Africa of some hitherto undiscovered 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



large mammal, possibly a relation of the Elephant. 
In connection with this, however, I should like to 
point out from my studies of the Bantu languages, 
that the ordinary large hippopotamus is not m- 
frequently called the water-elephant in the Bantu 
and Semi-Bantu languages of West-central Africa. 
The paraphrase is indeed a comparatively com- 
mon one, and especially in the regions whence t" e 
stories come of the existence of a water-elephant. 
I cannot help thinking, therefore, that the explana- 
tion of the whole rumoar lies in the too literal 
understanding of the African's terms. He has 
desired to inform theWhite man that in a certain 
river, lake, or swamp, there is a water-elephant, 
but what he means is nothing but the ordinary 
hippopotamus. 

I am, 

Yours obediently, 

H. H. JOHNSTON. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE. 

All Subscribers in Norway, Sweden, Den- 
mark, Spain, Portugal, Switzerland and Holland, 
who have not received their December and Janu- 
arv numbers, are requested to communicate at 
once with the Editor. They will in future re- 
ceive the Magazine through the Office of Messrs. 
W. H. Smith & Son, Strand, W.C. 



CHARLES JAMRACH. 




Born, 1815. Died, 1891. 

Aged 76 years. 

(This photograph was taken in 1868, when 53 

years old.) 

The Actual Founder of The Wild Beast, Bird and 

Reptile Trade in the World. 



I have received by the kindness of M. Wuir- 
ion, Societe Nationale d'Aviculture de France, 
Paris, the above photograph. 

It is the property of M. Geoffroy Saint 
Hilaire, the late Directeur du Jardin Zoologique 
d'Acclimatation de Paris. 

The thanks of the readers of this Magazine 
are cordially given to the above two gentlemen. 
It is my intention to write up fully the Life and 
History of this Founder of the Animal Trade in a 
later number of this Magazine. I should esteem 
it a favour if my readers will forward all inter- 
esting data, and any general information that 
they might have concerning the late Charles Jam- 
rac'h. 

It shall be faithfully and kindly recorded in 
this Magazine. 

I had the pleasure of being with this great 
man for twelve months some 38 years ago. It 
was a most interesting- and fortunate engagement 
for myself. His fund of humour was immense. 
His contempt for enormous losses and disappoint- 
ments were such as is seldom found in any man. 
I have known him lose £6,000 in one month and 
be absolutely cheerful over it. Yes; he was a 
great man in his day ! 

JOHN D. HAMLYX. 
February 5th, 1916. 



BIRD LIFE IN REGENTS PARK. 

By A. D. Webster. 

Having for many years kept a record of the 
visit of rare birds to the Park it has occurred to 
me that the following notes might prove of inter- 
est to some of your readers. 

Amongst the fifty-nine species that I have 
seen in the Park, several must be reckoned as 
extremely rare for London and include such un- 
common visitors as the Great Crested Grebe, 
Sandpiper, Nightingale, Golden Crested Wren, 
Y\ neatear, Snipe and Woodcock. 

When the general unfavourable conditions 
for bird life that exist in our parks are taken into 
account, the list must be considered as a long 
one, though the somewhat stringent rules of the 
Royal Parks and privacy of some of the shrub- 
beries and adjoining grounds have no doubt much 
to do with the appearance of the rarer kinds in 
this North Western corner of the great Metro- 
polis. A little over a century ago, when the pres- 
ent site of Portland Place was a famous Wood- 
cock drive and Snipe were shot by the Euston 
Road, old Marylebone Park Fields, now the site 
of Regent's Park, with their numerous hedges 
and thickets of trees were recorded as the haunts 
of several rare and interesting birds. Times have, 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



however, changed, and with the removal of trees 
and hedges, building of houses and opening up of 
the Park to the public, bird life became rarer and 
rarer, though everything taken into account, the 
present list of about sixty species must be looked 
at as encouraging for a densely inhabited district 
in the very heart of London. 

The Nightingale, for which old Marylebone 
Park was remarkable, I have only heard on three 
occasions, always near the same spot, a thick lilac 
shrubbery by the Inner Circle roadway, and where 
it was listened to with delight by several persons 
in the early hours of a June morning on two suc- 
cessive days in 1909. Small flocks of the Wheat- 
ear visit the Park about the beginning of April, 
and about the spring of 1909 they were particu- 
larly plentiful, as many as thirty having been 
counted in one flock. Twice during the autumn 
of 1900 I saw a pair of Goldfinches, and on several 
occasions the Grey Linnet and Siskin have paid 
us a visit. 

When the lake was being mudded in 1907 — 8 
a Kingfisher haunted the ground for the small 
roach and gudgeon that got stranded in some of 
the shallow pools. Regularly night and morning 
it visited the spot not seeming the least inconven- 
ienced by the large number of men at work. But 
probably rarest of all is the Great Crested Grebe 
which for fully seven weeks remained on the lake 
during the early part of last summer. The Lesser 
( Irebe has nested at the Northern end of the water 
which, being private, is always looked upon as a 
sanctuary for waterfowl. Twice in the early morn- 
ing I have seen the Sandpiper by the islands on 
the lake, but it is a rare and shy visitor. A pair 
of Herons have taken up their abode on one of the 
islands, and in the evening and early morning may 
be seen fishing in the shallow parts of the water. 
Once only has the Wnterrail been seen on the 
lake where it remained for about a week. 

During the spring of 1911 a Bullfinch was 
regularly fed from the hand with hempseed by a 
visitor to the Park — a most remarkable feat when 
the naturally shy nature of the bird is considered. 
The Barn Owl is not uncommon, as it breeds 
regularly in hollow elms by the lake side, but it is 
oftener heard than seen. Two or three times I 
have seen the Pied Wagtail, but it is rare and 
does not breed, which may also be said of the 
Yellowhammer, Hawfinch and Blackcap, all of 
which I have noticed on rare occasions. 

A liltle flock of the- long-tailed Tit visited my 
garden in 1905 but the}' did not remain long, 
merely flitting from one tree to another all the 
time uttering their somewhat plaintive note to 
each other. The Golden Crested Wren I have 
often seen and the Sedge Warbler by the reeds 
on the lake side. Twice to my knowledge has a 
Cuckoo been reared in the Park, the lost c-r mother 
on each occasion being the Robin and the home 
an ivy-clad wall or building. The Sparrow Hawk, 



evidently not an escape, was seen on several oc- 
casions during the summer of 1913, the fact being 
communicated to the Press by several visitors. 

The Redstart I have repeatedly seen during 
the winter and early spring, and once I saw a Haw- 
finch which is readily detected by its large beak 
and the conspicuous white iris of the eye. A nest 
of Blue Tits was reared bv the Inner Circle road 
in 1908 and again in 1910, but the Great Tit I 
have noticed only once. Regularly for a number 
of years the Missel Thrush bred in a large poplar 
tree in the Park. Chaffinches are rare, but by the 
lake side they may be sometimes detected. The 
Spotted Flycatcher reared its young- for several 
consecutive years from 19081 in the Park, but they 
have quite disappeared of late. 

The Woodcock has more than once been seen 
on Primrose Hill, and in May of 1908 a live speci- 
men was brought to me that had been caught by 
the Flower Garden; and during the long-continued 
drought of 1911 I flushed a Snipe on Marylebone 
Green at 6 a.m. on the 11th of August — a rare 
visitor indeed. 

Towards evening hundreds of Starlings as- 
semble for roosting on the thickly wooded islands 
of the lake, their song at that time being almost 
deafening. During a stormy night in October, 
1906, a most unusual occurrence took place, large 
numbers of these birds being washed to the ground 
and drowned by the heavy and continuous rain. 
Beneath a thorn tree near the centre of one of 
the islands I counted twenty-three dead birds and 
about seventy in othr parts of the adjoining 
grounds. 



SKUNK FARMS IN AMERICA. 

By Pierre Amedee-Pichot. 
(Translated from the Bulletin of the French Ac- 
climatization Society, December, 1915, by F, 
Finn.) 

One of the first documents one requires of an 
individual in the varied circumstances of social 
life is the certificate of his birth; before the estab- 
lishment of the civil state, it was his baptismal 
certificate. In the case of the animal about which 
I am just about to speak, I should have much diffi- 
culty in giving you either the one' or the other; 
its origin is lost in the mists ol ages, and as to 
its name, I have found so man) different appella- 
tions that 1 could not say which is the right "i.. . 
I leave to our scientific friends the task of eluci- 
dating a nomenclature so varied thai the Skunk 

has been called by al least twenty names bv 

naturalists, and thai the differenl species ol it arc 
equally rich in thai synonymy. 

The oldest author who has spoken of it is 



( apu< 



province of Paris. Fathe 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Gabriel Sagard Theodat, who, in a " History of 
Canada," published: in 1636, calls it "Child of the 
Devil," and says that it bea:s the name of " Scan- 
garesse" among the Hurons. "This animal," he 
says, "besides having a very bad smell', is very 
spiteful, and ugly to look at; it is of the size of a 
cat or a young fox; its skin is covered with a 
rough and sooty coat, and its bushy tail likewise; 
in winter it hides under the snow, and does not 
come out till the new moon in March." 

In these few lines are condensed the charac- 
teristics of that group of the Weasels of the New 
World, to which Buff on has applied the general 
name cf Mouffettes (stiflers) by analogy with the 
asphyxiating gas of which the unique perfume of 
these beasts reminds one. They are better known 
to us by the name of Skunks, adopted by our 
furriers, a word derived from the name " Seecawk" 
which is given to them by a certain tribe of Red- 
skins, and has the same signification. 

The Skunks have the widest distribution on 
the American continent of all the Weasels. They 
differ considerably from all the other animals of 
the family and show an approach toi the Badgers. 
Their gait is not lively like that of the Beech and 
Pine Martens and the Weasels; they plod quietly 
through meadow and wood; nothing frightens or 
upsets them, and it is no doubt their confidence 
in the efficaciousness, of their means of defence 
which gives them this contempt of danger. When 
it sees the foe, the Skunk does not run away; it 
stops, turns to meet him, and hoists its colours in 
the shape of its bushy tail, the long waving hair 
of which hartgs over its back and envelopes it- 
like the folds of a flag. Its coolness reminds one 
of the calmness with which the Colonel of the 
Crequi-dragoon Regiment said to his officers, in 
one of those splendid eighteenth-century battles — 
so unlike the brutal butcheries of our days — " Gen- 
tlemen, tighten the ribbons of your pigtails and 
see your hats are on straight; we are to have the 
honour of charging!" But the Skunk does not 
charge; its dis-charges, and what it tightens up 
are not pigtail-ribbons ! 

In fact, its weapons are neither the powerful 
canines with which its jaws are armed, nor the 
sharp claws on its paws, but its anal glands which 
secrete, in their muscular pouches, a horrible; fluid 
which this beast can eject in the form of a spray 
to a distance of three metres, and possesses such 
a stench and is so irritating and acrid that the 
boldest enemy is put to flight by a few discharges. 
Unfortunately for the beast, it wears a fur which 
nude humanity looked on with envy, and in spite 
of the persistence of its repulsive scent, of which 
for a long time it proved impossible to get rid, 
Skunk-furs became the staple of a trade so impor- 
tant that we have seen the number imported rise 
from 1,265 skins which the Hudson Bav Company 
sold in Europe in 1849, to 12,583, for this Com- 
pany alone, in 1890. Other American companies 



who, altogether, put, in 1858, 10,136 skins on the 
market, supplied, ten years later, 678,199. 

In spite of being distributed over the whole 
extent of the United States and the southern parts 
of Canada, in spite of its extreme prolificacy, 
which reaches the number of a dozen young at 
each litter, the Skunk is, therefore, like the birds 
whose plumage is favoured by fashions, threatened 
with extermination. Naturally the idea has arisen 
of exploiting its economically and sensibly by 
domesticating it. The disposition of the beast 
favours this; it is not only, as I have been saying, 
not timid, but its boldness even leads it to ap- 
proach human habitations, and it has been ob- 
served that it particularly frequents cultivated 
land 1 , where it likes to make its earth under farm- 
buildings and sheds, a practice which, on account 
of the scent of the animal, is not always looked on 
with a very favourable eye by the occupants. 

The proximity of poultry-yards, and the scraps 
of all sorts thrown away about houses, no doubt 
have something to do with this taste; for, not 
having the activity and quickness of movement of 
most of the Weasles, the Skunk lives on mice, in- 
sects, grubs, fruit, and the eggs of birds which 
nest on the ground — on what it can get with the 
least trouble to itself, in short. 

It thus comes about that several years ago 
the practice of rearing Skunks in captivity began 
in the United States. Besides the diminution of 
the wild animals another reasons operated in 
favour of these experiments. By breeding, it was 
hoped to obtain furs of better quality and colour 
than those furnished by the trappers' pursuit. 
The beast, not being exposed to the inclemency 
of the weather, hunger, and other vicissitudes of 
a life of freedom, ought to furnish much finer 
pelts, of a quality which should satisfy the 
demands of the trade. 

The earliest ajttempts seem not always to 
have given good results, owing to want of ex- 
perience in the sort of treatment needed for the 
captive animals, and a certain establishment begun 
on a large scale twenty years ago in Pennsylvania 
wound up lamentably; but since that time methods 
have been perfected, and one of the chief authori- 
ties on fur-bearing animals, Mr. Seton, of Con- 
necticut, considers that Skunk-farming is the 
most likely branch of the industry to give remuner- 
ative results. Nowadays there are several Skunk- 
farms which handle two or three hundred animals. 

Skunk-farms are managed in much the same 
way as the Fox-farms about which I have already 
spoken; that is to say, the animals have their 
liberty in fairly extensive enclosures, while at the 
same time they are under the control of the 
breeder. These enclosures are made as much as 
possible on dry soils — sandy or rocky, but not on 
chalk land; the ground must be porous, to avoid 
water-logging, but it is all the better if watered 
by a running-stream and covered with bushes, 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Hamlgn's ffltmgmt ^tajja^itu. 

Published on the 15th of each month. 



Editorial and Business Office (pro tem) : — 

221, ST. GEORGE'S STREET, LONDON, E. 
Telephone: Avenue 6341. 
Telegrams : " Hamlyn, London Docks, London." 



Advertisement Rates, very reasonable, on application. 

The Editor will be glad to receive for publication articles 
and alt interesting photos, the imports and exports of all 
stock, and foreign adventures with all wild stock. The 
subscription is fc'/- per ann., post free, which will be sent 
under cover. 



heath, and a growth of low shrubs. The enclosure 
is surrounded with a fence of netting or boards, 
the bottom of which is buried in the ground to 
prevent the beasts from digging underneath, and 
the top furnished with an overhang to prevent 
their escape by climbing over. It is divided into 
several compartments, for the accommodation of 
males, females, and young, at such times as it is 
necessary to keep these separate, and finally, 
each compartment is furnished with a row of 
hutches like those used for rabbits, where the 
females take shelter to give birth to their litters 
and rear them, if they do not dig their own earths 
in the ground. 

The Skunks, which are naturally omnivorous, 
are fed on meats (dried, boiled or raw), poultry 
offal, butchers' waste, mashes of oatmeal or other 
meals, cooked potatoes, milk, bread and fruit; 
and the insects which they find within the limits 
of their run go far to keep them in health. A diet 
of raw meat only would kill them as surely as 
would a purely vegetable one. 

NOTE. — To those contemplating Skunk farming 
I beg to refer them to the advertisement on in- 
side cover. There are only twelve left. The 
only arrivals in Great Britain during the past 
three years. They were imported at very great 
expense, in consequence of the frequent enquir- 
ies and orders given for these animals. When 
they arrived, the usual thing happened : the 
supposed buyers began to make offers; when 
these liberal offers were refused, they hinted if 
they waited long enough they might get 
cheaper. I am pleased to say the price still 
remains the same. — En. 



ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF 
IRELAND. 



ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING. 
The annual meeting of the Royal Zoological 
Society of Ireland was held on January 27th in the 



Theatre of the Royal Dublin Society, Leinster 
House. It was largely attended. 

Mr. W. E. Peebles, J.P. , Senior Vice-President 
of the Society, occupied the chair, in the absence 
of the President, Sir Charles B. Ball, Bart., M.D. 
He was sorry to announce that Sir Charles Ball 
was unable to be present owing to illness. 

The Hon. Secretary (Professor G. H. Car- 
penter) submitted and moved the adoption of the 
Council's Report for 1915. The depressing in- 
fluence of the war on the Society's resources had 
been a feature emphasised in the report for the 
year 1914. During the year just passed the diffi- 
culties of the situation had not diminished, though, 
thanks to the generous response of members to 
the appeal made at the end of 1914 for special 
gifts, which amounted to an aggregate of £424, 
the financial position of the Society was slightly 
better than it had been twelve months previously. 
This was encouraging, when it was found that 
the gate receipts had fallen £241 during 1915 after 
the alarming drop of £270 in the preceding year. 
The total number of visitors in 1913 was 162,618; 
in 1914, 175,332; in 1915, 153,031. The receipts 
at gate in 1913 were £2,197 16s. 3d.; in 1914, 
£1,910 6s. 8d.; in 1915, £1,673 15s. 7d. The 
Council had come to realise that during war-time 
the support of the members was more than ever 
a deciding factor for the' Society's continued use- 
fulness. After the generous response made last 
year, it had been decided to issue no further ap- 
peals for contributions at present, but those mem- 
bers who were able and willing again to help the 
finances by special gifts were reminded that the 
Society closed the year £447 in debt. Sir Charles 
Ball, having held the Presidency for a term of 
five years, now relinquished the office according 
to the Society's by-law. For the vacant chair 
of the Society the Council confidently submitted 
the name of Mr. W. Ei. Peebles, J. P., whose in- 
valuable services during his thirty-six years' mem- 
bership of the Council were appreciated by all 
frequenters of the Gardens. The year 1915, with 
its sad memories for all, would be notable for the 
death of two prominent and highly-valued mem- 
bers of the Council — Mr. J. Nugent Lentaigne and 
Mr. R. M. Barrington. A good account of Mr. 
Barrington's life and a list of his numerous origi- 
nal contributions to zoology and botany, by his 
friend, Mr. C. B. Moffat, would be found in the 
"Irish Naturalist" for November, 1915. 

THE ANIMAL COLLECTIONS. 

Owing to the need for strict economy, addi- 
tions to the stock of animals (the report stated) 
had been made only by gifts, no money being 
available lor the purchase of specimens. During 
the summer, sea lions were offered to the Society, 
and, in view of the death of the Society's speci- 
mens, the Council gratefully accepted Mr. T. K. 
Laidlaw's offer to defray the cost of one. Vn- 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



fortunately, it was found impossible to obtain the 
supply of fish necessary for feeding such an ani- 
mal, and the negotiations consequently fell 
through. The presence in the Society's collec- 
tion during 1914 of examples of each of the four 
type of anthropoid ape was a noteworthy feature. 
This "record" was brought to an end as early as 
March by the death of the orang-utan, "Sandy." 
In December the small female chimpanzee, 
"Susan," died, succumbing in a few days to an 
attack of pneumonia. However, the other four 
apes that had been in the house a year ago were 
still alive and vigorous — the Hoolock gibbon, the 
chimpanzees "George" and "Charlie," and the 
gorilla, "Empress, " the last-named having now 
lived two years in the charge of the Superinten- 
dent and Keeper, J. Supple. All the older animals 
in the Lion House a year ago were still on view, 
but during the summer a welcome and unexpected 
inquiry for cubs was followed 1 by the sale of most 
of the youngsters available, for which a good price 
was secured. During 1915 three litters were born, 
comprising four males and five females, all of 
which were alive on December 31st, when the 
Society's total lion stock amounted to twenty- 
three animals — twelve males and eleven females. 
The collection of birds suffered during the Novem- 
ber frosts, when a flamingo and the two black- 
necked swans hurt themselves on the ice, and 
died as a result of the injuries. Another loss was 
the large domestic goose, believed to have at- 
tained the age of 44 years. 

The Treasurer, Dr. MacDowel Cosgrave, 
seconded the adoption of the report. Having re- 
ferred to' some financial figures for the past year, 
he emphasised the necessity of gaining new mem- 
bers for the Society. He added that if the Society 
was to work successfully the gate-money ought to 
pay about two-thirds of the expenses. He asked 
that members should send gifts of fruit and vege- 
tables for the animals, and that citizens who were 
organising- entertainments should remember the 
Gardens. 

The report was adopted. 

The sets of pictures sent in to the yearly 
photographic competition in November were again 
of a high degree of merit. The silver medal in the 
.Senior Class was won by Mr. Arthur MacCallum, 
of Rathmines. The sets sent in by the juniors 
were so ,good that a special Silver medal has 
been awarded to Miss M. A. Goodman, and a 
bronze medal to Master James Fitzgibbon. 

The Chairman handed the medals to the win- 
ners. In his subsequent remarks, he said it was 
utterly beyond the Council's power to meet the 
present state of things which had caused the great 
debt the Society was under. The high price of 
coal, the high price of provender, and the drop 
in the gate receipts — these were things they had 
no power over. But there was a way of meeting 



the difficulty, and that was by increasing the num- 
ber of members of the Society. 

The Chairman then proposed a vote of thanks 
to Sir Charles Ball for his services as President 
of the Society. Having traced the connection with 
the Society of ether members of the Ball family, 
Sir Robert Ball and Mr. Valentine Ball, he said 
that during the lengthened period he had been 
on the Council — he had had experience of nine 
Presidents — there had never been a President who 
had given more of his time and attention to the 
Society's affairs than Sir Charles Ball. ■ 

A part of the proceedings that pleased the 
gathering very much was a lecture, in which Pro- 
fessor J. A. Scott described interestingly many 
animals, which were illustrated by lantern pic- 
tures. 

At the close it was announcd that the follow- 
ing Council had been elected for 1916 : President 
— W. E. Peebles, J. P. Vice-Presidents — Profes- 
sor J. Bayley Butler, T. K. Laidlaw, Sir R. H. 
Woods, M.D., M. F. Headlam, James Inglis. 
Secretary — Professor G. H. Carpenter. Treasurer 
— Dr. MacDowel Cosgrave. Ordinary Members 
—Dr. C. A. K. BalC Professor A. 'F. Dixon, 
Charles Green, Lieutenant-Colonel W. E. John- 
stone, Dr. R. R. Leeper, Professor A. E. Mettam, 
C. J. MacCarthv, A. Miller, Sir F. W .Moore, 
Dr. J. O 'Carroll, Professor J'. A. Scott, Dr. 
George Scriven, Colonel Sir Frederick Shaw, L. 
E. Steele, H. Francis Stephens. 



ELEPHANT'S WAR WORK. 



NOVEL SPECTACLE IN STREETS OF 
SHEFFIELD. 

A shortage of haulage facilities has caused 
Sheffield manufacturers to look round for likely 
assistance, and one enterprising firm — Messrs. 
Thos. W. Ward. Limited — has pressed an ele- 
phant into service. 

It is put between the shafts in correct man- 
ner, and can do the work of five horses. It 
thinks nothing of a load of eight tons. 

The animal belongs to Messrs. Sedgewick's, 
the well-known Menagerie Proprietors, who 
realised that while circumstances caused them to 
stop in Sheffield longer than they had anticipated, 
i( would be a good thing toi let out on hire thcir 
horses and a tractable elephant. 

As the elephant passes along it invariably 
investigates the tops of coal and other carts in 
the hope of finding something edible. More than 
one carter's dinner has mysteriously disappeared. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Some twenty years ago I was approached by 
a very well-known London Contractor as to the 
suitability of elephants for London street haulage. 

I pointed out to this gentleman that it was 
not a matter of only buying the elephant, bit its 
keeper and attendant was a very serious considera- 
tion. Suitable attendants for large elephants are 
very hard to find. Elephants have their likes and 
dislikes. I asked the Contractor what he would 
do in the event of the keeper not turning up one 
morning. "Well," he replied, "I should certainly 
send round for you !" The project fell through. I 
could not guarantee an elephant keeper at a 
moment's notice. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN, 



HISTORY OF THE GOULDIAN FINCH. 

FROM 1885 TO 1916. 



Poephila mirabilis (Redheads). 
Poepnila gouldia? (Blackheads). 



The first arrivals of the Gouldian Grass Finch 
in Europe consisted of five specimens' — three Red- 
heads and two Blackheads — in April, 1885, three 
of which were presented to the Zoological Society, 
Regents Park, by a Mr. C. X. Rosenfeld, and two 
being sold in Paris to a well-known amateur at 
twenty-five pounds each. 

These were from the Charters Towers dis- 
trict, Northern Queensland. 

I might say in passing that it is only within 
the last fifteen years, or thereabouts, that they 
ho e arrived from the Port Darwin district, North- 
ern Territory. 

Some thirty years ago the Quec nsland Coast 
was opened up by the British Indian Steamship 
Co., their steamers sailing monthly from the 
Royal Albert Dorks, calling at Thursday Island, 
Rockhampton, right up to Brisbane. 

The Gouldian district was Charters Towers, 
some considerable distance inland from Brisbane. 

Sometime in 1886, I received a letter from the 

( aptain of the S.S. " Bulimba," one of the B.I.S.S. 

licet, enclosing ■■■ dead specimen ol a highly col- 
oured redheaded bird, totally new to me. Never 
had I seen sin h i small finch with such wondrous 
plumage. i was card nils examining the speci- 
men when one of the Mr. Jamrach's entered the 
shop. He gave me the startling information thai 
there were onlj another five such birds in Europe; 
they were of great value and were known as the 
Gouldian Pinch. 



The Captain had evident! 
Jamrach and also rmself. Th 



n Mr. Ch 

■ 40 bird- 



all. The price was £10 each. If I required them 
I was to meet the steamer at Plymouth taking 
delivery there. 

I must candidlv confess I could not then mus- 
ter £400' for 40 birds. 

I resolved to wait the arrival of the steamer 
in the Royal Albert Docks, taking' a chance of 
buying at a lower figure. 

Mr. Jamrach went to Plymouth, but could 
not agree as to price. He considered the price 
prohibitive. I met the steamer at Gravesend. 
There, were twenty dozen mixed Cherry, Double- 
banded, Parson, and other small finches, which I 
purchased at twenty shillings a dozen. That was 
the usual price in those days. Two Aery Black 
Apes from Batavia. Forty Red and Black-headed 
Gouldian Finches. The Ca'ptain asked then £5 
each. I offered £2, each, which was refused. He 
took the birds home to Kensington the same day. 
I then mentioned the arrival of the birds to a Con- 
tinental Dealer who happened to be staying at 
his accustomed house, "The Brown Bear," Leman 
Street, E. He was willing to give £3 each. We 
called at Kensington the following morning and, 
after a very long discussion as to their value, the 
Captain accepted £120 for the lot. 

On their arrival at Leman Street, the late 
Joseph Abrahams and Charles Jamrach bought 
five pairs each, the remainder went to the Con- 
tinent. My commission was £20. Thisi was the 
first deal in Gouldians in the history of the trade. 

I disposed of the twenty dozen mixed finches 
to the Continental Dealer, the Black Apes went to 
Messrs. Jennison, Belle Vue. Manchester. I then 
resolved to< pay particular attention to the monthly 
steamers from Queensland. The next arrival of 
birds from that region consisted of 1 Ganga Cock- 
atoo, 20' mixed Bloodwings, King Parrots and 
Mealy Rosellas. In those days we paid ten shil- 
lings each all round for Parrots and Parrakeets, 
sixty shillings lor the Ganga. Some passengers 
brought a few pairs of Gouldians not for sale. 

A considerable time now elapsed before any 
quantity of Gouldians arrived. 

They were brought by a Mr. Owen, the sail- 
maker of l he steamer. He had the extraordinary 
number of 200 1 Red and Blackheads. The price 
asked was 15/- each. They were ultimately bought 
b\ the same Continental Dealer for 10/- each. 
After this they arrived in small quantities on each 
steamer, the price keeping to 10/- for quite twelve 
months. 

There then arrived an old Queensland Bird 
(atelier with a considerable number which spoilt 
the market. He took them to some friends of his 
in the City Road, selling out as best he could, 

w holcsale and retail. 

(To be continued. J 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

That we are now threatened with a Showmen's 
Syndicate to capture the Wild Beast Trade of 
the World. In 1913 certain amateurs suggested 
doing- so. We still breathe freely. Syndicates 
not yet formed ! We suggest they combine : 
united they have a ghost of a chance of suc- 
cess; divided they absolutely fail. Even united, 
we give them six months, and then the after- 
math ! What lovely recriminations. 

The article on above Syndicates held over. 

That a Walrus has been captured by the sailors 

of one of our warships. He was christened 

"Von Tirpitz." 

That M. G. de Soathoff, of Leysin, Switzerland, 

writes under date 24th January : — 

" I have received safely your Magazine. 
Why do you not publish more articles on the 
Menagerie World? You can publish that 
many servants at Hagenbeck's Travelling 
Menagerie were spions" (I suppose Mr. Sou- 
thoff means spies) " and now they are officers 
in the Huns army in France ! Hoping to> be 
able to send you some paper on the Animal 
Keeping. I wish you every success." 
That the arrivals in London Docks have been 
Amazon Parrots, quantity of Conures, 15 Mar- 
mozets, 1 Toucan, 30 Rhesus Monkeys, 20 Mon- 
gooses, 12 Mynahs, 13 Chacma Baboons, 3 
Secretaries, 2 Stanleys, 4 Hyrax, 2 Meercats, 4 
Chimpanzees, 4 Mandrills, 1 Schmidts, 1 Man- 
gabey (rare), 2i Bonnets, 2 Lapondas, 100 Ameri- 
can Grey Squirrels, 55 Budgerigars, 90' Cock 
Canaries, 309 Hens, 2 Demoiselle Cranes, 3 
talking Grey Parrots, 1 Black Swan, 1 Cock 
Jungle Fowl, 1 -Salt Desert Cat, 1 Acland 
Grison, 2 Sand Hamsters. 
That the arrivals in Liverpool have been 12 Dog- 
faces, 1 Mona, 1 Hussar, 1 Civet Cat, a few 
Grey Parrots, with other odds, and ends. 
That Monkeys and Parrots occasionally arrive 

in Hull. 
That a correspondent sends an account of the 
hardships of the animals at the Budapest Zoo : 
"The animals in the Budapest Zoo are also 
feeling the pangs of hunger owing to the 
scarcity of foodstuffs, and these are sad times 
for the animals in the Varosliget. The horse- 
flesh with which they fed the wild animals has 
become so expensive that rations had to be re- 
duced by half, so that the roaring of the lions 
and tigers is now incessant, to the great delight 
it may be added, of the children. The wild 
birds, eagles, and vultures, etc., are being fed 
with the flesh of rats, bred for the purpose in 
the Zoo by hundreds and killed by dozens daily, 
so as to save the horseflesh for the king of 
beasts. Some days there was no horseflesh at 
all, and in order to keep the lions and wolves 
and other wild beasts alive they had to slaughter 



some of the goats and other less valuable ani- 
mals exhibited in the Zoo. The herbivorous ani- 
mals are also very badly off. There is no hay to 
be had at all, and a substitute has been found in 
wild chestnuts, an innovation strongly deplored 
by the animals, but reluctantly accepted as bet- 
ter than nothing. Even under these circum- 
stances last year's budget of the Budapest Zoo 
was double that of the previous year, although 
many of the animals have been disposed of in 
consequence of the food difficulties. The seals — 
there were about ten of them — were killed, for 
no fish could be provided for them, and their 
flesh was given to the wild beasts,. Two of the 
polar bears were also shot, one because he abso- 
lutely refused to eat the war food and the other 
because he grew so weak on the new diet that 
it was an act of charity to finish him off. The 
director of the Zoo opened a competition for 
the shooting of the polar bears, and one Ximrod 
paid twelve pounds for the pleasure of settling 
them." 

That from time to time there have appeared in 
the English Press conflicting reports of w^hat 
was done with the animals in the Antwerp Zoo- 
logical Gardens at the time of the bombardment. 
The point is now settled by a letter from the 
director of the Rotterdam Gardens which ap- 
pears in the New York Zoological Society's 
" Bulletin." It is as follows : — 

"All the bears in the Antwerp Zoological 
Gardens were shot prior to the bombardment. 
The large feline carnivora were put into strong 
transportation cages and removed to the rcar 
of the garden, likewise prior to the bombard- 
ment, while the small felinse were transferred 
to cages in the cellars of the Festival Building. 
A few days before the surrender of the city, 
when the heavy cannonading started fires in al! 
parts of the city, which could no longer be put 
out in consequence of lack of water, the large 
carnivora were likewise shot by resolution of 
the board of directors, adopted contrary to the 
director's advice. None of the other animals 
were killed, with the exception of a few veno- 
mous snakes. During the bombardment onlv 
one shell dropped into the garden, striking the 
ground in the open space for the turtles, where 
it fortunately did no material damage,. Mr. 
L'Hoest (the director) and his two younger 
children were my guests from October 5 to the 
earlier part of November, while the other 
members of his family likewise came to Rotter- 
dam towards the end of the bombardment. Mr. 
L'Hoest himself, whose mind had suffered 
severely from the effects of the terrible excite- 
ment and of the successive events which over- 
powered him, also came to Rotterdam for a 
few days after the bombardment. The Ant- 
werp garden and the animals kept there have 
suffered no further damage during the siege." 



Printed by W. J. Hastid * Son, (T.U.), 306, Mile End Road, London, E. 



WILLSON'S LIVE STOGK PROVIDERS, Ltd., 

37, New Oxford Street, London, W.C. 

Telephone— Gerrard, 7708. Telegrams— Highbred Westcent, London. Bankers— London County & Westminster. 



LONDON'S CHIEF EMPORIUM FOR DOGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



All our adult dogs are sold on 14 days' trial on condition that if not liked they will be 
exchanged for livestock to value from our stock within this period. 

All our Dogs are daily inspected by a Qualified Veterinary Surgeon. 



-A. VISIT XS RESPECTFULLY E/EQ.UESTED. 

E. W. LITTLE, F.z.s., 

Practical Naturalist and Taxidermist. 

SPECIALIST IN BIG GAME TROPHIES 
AND FISH MOUNTING- 

Studios: 65, YORK STREET, BAKER STREET W. 

PADDINQTON 6903. LONDON. 

GREY SQUIRRELS for Sale. 

Direct from North America, per S.S. "Minnehaha." 

FEMALES, 25/6. MALES, 20/6. 

SAFE DELIVERY GUARANTEED. ONLY VERY FEW LEFT. 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 221, St. George's Street, 

LONDON, EAST. 



f 



>©< 



^ 



Hamlyns 
Menagerie 
Magazine. 



: 



No. 11.— Vol. 1. 



MARCH, 1916. 



Price One Shilling 






CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTORY 

THE KINDS OF CHIMPANZEES 
OLD PLAYBILL OF A MENAGERIE 
JAMRACH'S— (concluded) 
THE SPOTTED PANTHER BIRD 
THE FIRST ENGLISH MENAGERIE 
BLUE FOX FARMS ... 



GENERAL NOTES 



& 



:3©c 



4 



Telegrams: Hamlyn, London Docks. London, 



Telephone : 6341 Avenue 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station. 
Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence five minutes walk. 

P. O.O. payable at Leman Stveet, East. Cheques crossed " London County &> Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TERMS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from time of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back. TELEPHONE. — Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS— Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIYERY. — Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same. 



For the arrivals fror 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

abroad during the past month. Full Particulars are given in 



General Notes. 



Chimpanzees:— 

Constantly arriving, ranging from £50 to £150 each. 



North American Grey Squirrels (Sciurus cinereus. 

Females 25/6. Males 20/6. 
Grey Squirrels thrive in all our London Parks, and the various 
Zoological Gardens. They can be sent safely packed, and deliv- 
ery guaranteed. Early application requested. 

10 Canadian Black White Skunks (Mephitis 

mephitica) ... ... ... ... each 80/6 

These take the place of the Indian Mongoose for rats and 
all vermin. They are entirely devoid of any objectionable 
smell, the scent bacs being abstracted. The only Skunks at 
present for sale in Great Britain. 

African saddle backed Jackals. Each 70/6. 
These are the largest Jackals ever I have imported. 3 Males, 

2 Females, all in sound condition. 

100 Indian Rhesus Monkeys to arrive shortly. 

1 Meercats, from South Africa ... 

2 Mongooses, from India ... ... ... each 

(These are for Rats and all Vermin) 
1 Raccoon, medium size ... ... ... only 

1 male, adult, Blessbok (Damaliscus albifrons), in 

sound, healthy condition, first direct importa- . 

tion for years. Very low pr'ice(/y>-^c*^f7? r --ft ^, (2\ 
1 Red Deer Stag, 2 years old ... ... ... °^ J 

Some tame Fallow Deer for sale. 



60/6 
40/6 



50/6 



£30 
80/6 



Sea Lions. — To arrive from California in April — May, Six young 
Males. I have these ordered, still I am open to book for 
delivery others if ordered immediately. 

Polar Bears. — Four under order. Will be sent as they arrive. 
Prices on application. 

Chacma Baboons. — Direct importation from South Africa. 

Lion Cubs, 3 males, 1 female, 11 months old. Particulars on 

application. 
Blue and White Foxes, see other page. 
1 Australian Emus, very fine ... ... ... £12 

(Adult splendid bird, been outdoors 2 years.) 
1 Australian Black Swan, female ... ... 80/6 

12 White Swans, females ... ... 25/-, males 20/- 



cocks 10/6 hens 12/6 



for 
each 



4 Jungle Fowls 

2 Muscovy Ducks 

3 Mallards 
1 Hen Common Pheasant 

3 Talking African Grey Parrots in cages 

1 ,, Blue Buff Macaw, very fine ... 

4 Blue-fronted Amazons, very tame 
12 Green Macaws, very fine 
20 Large Double Yellow Fronted Amazons 
20 Large Red Fronted Amazons 

2 Laughing Jackasses 
10 Red-headed Pope Cardinals, very fine 
4 Glossy Cow Birds— males 
2 ,, ,, hens 

1 Saffron Finch 

2 Whydahs, hens 

3 Ruficauda Finches ... 
20 Yellow Budgerigars 
30 Green „ 
3 pairs Chilo Wigeon ... 
2 ,, ,, Pintail ... 

1 ,, Bahamas 
2 J ,, Red Crested Pochards ... 

2 ,, African Triangular Spotted Doves 

The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at 
cal Society's Gardens, Regents Park, London 
2 ,, Alligators, 3.J feet each ... ... ,, 70/6 

2 ,, King Snakes ... ... ... ,, 25/6 

3 Hardwickcs Mastigure (Uromastix hardwickii) each 10/6 
6 Boa Constrictors, 6 to 8 feet ... ... each 50/-, 60/ 



pair 20/6 

each 10/6 

5/- 

5/6 

£7 to £10 each 

£5 

each £2 

£6 

£2 

£2 

£10 

7/6 

7/6 

5/6 

7/6 

7/6 

16/6 



pair 



5/- 



50/6 



,, 50/6 
,,' 30/6 
The Zoologi- 



4 Cooks Tree Boas (Corallus cookii) 

3 Thick-necked Tree Boas (Epicratcs cenchris) ... 

2 Banded Tailed Tree Snakes (Leptophis liocercus) 
6 Angulated Snakes (Helicops angulatus) 

3 Giant Toads (Bufo marinus) ... 

8 Bird-eating Spiders (Avicularia avicularia) 

(Extraordinary specimens, seldom imported.) 
2 Gigantic Centepedes (Scolopendra gigantea) ... 



each 



30/ 
30/ 
30/ 
25/ 
12/6 
20/6 

12/6 



Hamlgn's Jttenagerie JEaga^to. 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 11.— Vol. 1. 



LONDON, MARCH, 1916. 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

List of Subscribers, Feb. 12th to March 7th. 

Lieutenant Colonel C. Hull, 8th Divisional Train, 
France. 

John \Y. Marsden, Thornhurst, Tewit Park, Har- 
rogate. 

R. Scott-Miller, Greenoakhill, Broomhouse, Scot- 
land. 

E. A. Le Souef, Zoological Gardens, Perth, Aus- 
tralia. 



The full list of Subscribers from the com- 
mencement accompany this number. 



By arrangement with Messrs. W. H> Smith 
& Son, 186, Strand, W.C., "Hamlyn's Menagerie 
Magazine" is on sale on the 16th of each month 
at the following Railway Stations : — 

Charing Cross (South Eastern and Chatham 
Railway). 

King's Cross (Great Northern Railway). 

Liverpool Street (Great Eastern Railway). 

St. Pancras (Midland Railway). 

Victoria (South Eastern and Chatham Rail- 
way). 

Waterloo (South Western Railway). 



The subscription for Vol. I., Nos. 1 to 12, is 
6/- post free. All subscriptions commence with 
No. 1. The price of this March Number is 1/-, 
post free. 

I have still a few December numbers for sale, 
1/-, post free. This contains the reproduction of 
a photograph taken at a Menagerie Sale in 1896. 



Many interesting reproductions of old photo- 
graphs will appear from time to time. I have a 
collection of several hundred. 



All Subscribers in Norway, Sweden, Den- 
mark, Spain, Portugal, Switzerland and Holland, 
who have not received their usual numbers, are 
requested to communicate at once with the Editor. 
They will in future receive the Magazine through 
the Office of Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son, Strand, 
W.C. 



On the 15th April, 1916, we complete the first 
volume of "Hamlyn's Menagerie Magazine." 



Its actual Subscribers to date number 80. The 
Honorary Subscribers by courtesy of exchange are 
50. The general circulation for business purposes 
average 800 1 . Copies have~ occasionally been 
posted to every Zoological Garden in the world, 
with the exception of those in Austria and Ger- 
many. 



It has survived great opposition from man} 
to whom I had looked for support. 



It was launched during the most critical time 
in the History of the British Empire. 



I believe it has justified its existence. It now 
remains for the Subscribers of Vol. I. to continue 
their support of Vol. II. 



The subscription for Vol. II. will be 10/- per 
mnum, post free; single copies, 19-, post free. 



I appeal to every reader of this number W 
forward their subscriptions without any delay. 



I have already received subscriptions lor Vol. 
II., and I take greal pleasure in staling that Mr. 

E. A. I.e Souef, of the Zoological Gardens, Perth, 

Australia, was the first subscriber lor Vol. II. 



JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Letter from Professor Keith, Conservator 

of Museum, Royal College of 

Surgeons, on 

THE KINDS OF CHIMPANZEE. 

Dear Mr. Hamlyn, 

I am sure that all who are connected with 
Natural History Museums welcome the appearance 
of your "Menagerie Magazine," and wish it a 
real and permanent success. By no other means 
can we hope to unite the interests of the profes- 
sional trader and the professional student. In 
reality we are all students — trading naturalists and 
museum naturalists, and for the progress of 
knowledge — and the enlistment of a healthy and 
liberal public interest — it is absolutely necessary 
that we should all work together. I can best illus- 
trate my meaning by referring to an interesting and 
profitable visit I made to your establishment a 
few days ago. You have at present three young 
chimpanzees — probably the most interesting group 
of anthropoids now in Europe or America. They 
are so different in appearance and also in their 
'disposition's that one naturally concludes that 
they represent three different kinds of chimpan- 
zee, different varieties or even, perhaps, different 
species. 

The youngest one, "Zoe," with all the cling- 
ing habits of a baby, is just completing her milk 
set of teeth — the canine or eye teeth and the 
second moilar or chewing teeth are cut and just 
coming into place; I suppose her to be a little over 
a year in age — perhaps 15 months; at a corres- 
ponding stage of tooth development a human child 
would be about two years of age. 

Now that brings me to my first question : Are 
chimpanzee babies born at any season as human 
babies are, or do they come, as is the custom 
among wild animals, at one season? Suppose 
that my estimate of her age is right, then she 
would have been born a little over a year ago — that 
is in one of the later months of 1914 — when the 
scaffolding of our European civilization was being 
shattered by Germany. We have very little in- 
formation concerning the season at which the 
young of chimpanzees are born, but I am certain 
that there are many naturalists who trade with 
the West Coast of Africa could help us in settling 
this matter. No one ever brought back from 
Africa so great a store of knowledge relating to 
gorillas and chimpanzees than Du Chaillu; his 
book, published in 1861, is still our chief diction- 
ary of anthropoid lore, but he made no enquiry 
relating to a breeding lime. In the month of May 
,Ou Chaillu shot a mother chimpanzee with a baby 
at breast, about one foot in length, which 1 esti- 
mate to have been 5 or 6 months old. That obser- 



vation points to a birth season about November 
or December. 

The two other anthropoids in your possession 
— -"Gilbert," a lively frolicsome fellow, and 
"Philip," who is morose, rather sulky and shy — 
are further advanced than "Zoe." In both of 
them the first tooth of the permanent set — the 
first molars or chewing teeth — are coming into 
use. From enquiries I made, over 20 years ago 
now, I was led to believe that such animals were 
at the end of their third or beginning of their 
fourth year. They would, therefore, belong to 
the chimpanzee brood of November or Decem- 
ber, 1912; — the difference between " Zoe" and them 
representing the growth of two years. Now I do 
not say that we have as yet any good grounds for 
believing in a definite breeding season amongst 
chimpanzees and gorillas, but I am certain there 
must be among your readers several who could 
help in settling the matter. 

Your three chimpanzees also raise for us 
another vexed question. They are very different 
in their pigmentation. " Zoe" has a pale face; 
"Gilbert's faceis darkening; "Philip's" face is 
becoming covered with black pigmented spots. 
Their noses are not shaped alike; their hair differs 
in texture and in abundance; "Gilbert's" hair is 
darker, longer, rougher, and more plentiful. The 
explanation which appeals to one most is to sup- 
pose that all three represent different varieties or 
even species. 

Zoologists and Naturalists are well aware 
that Lord Rothschild is keenly interested in the 
races, varieties and species of anthropoid apes. 
Twelve years ago he contributed a very important 
paper to the proceedings of the Zoological Society 
of London in which he sought to show that there 
are at least live quite distinct species of chimpan- 
zee, and that some of these species are sub- 
divided into as many as four distinct varieties. 
He has taken great care to gather accurate infor- 
mation, and has spent liberally in collecting speci- 
mens from all parts. Lord Rothschild would be 
the first to admit that we have still much to learn 
concerning the matter of species, and we can only 
hope to settle our doubts by the help of those who 
gather and import specimens from their native 
haunts in Africa. 

We can best realize the nature of our present 
difficulties if we suppose that a very intelligent 
chimpanzee has become director of Jungle 
Museum. He receives stray specimens of human 
beings collected by chimpanzee sailor men on a 
visit to Europe. I am pretty certain our jungle 
director would make many mistakes when he came 
to sort us out into varieties and species if he fol- 
lowed the method we have adopted. A bald head 
would seem to hini a very distinct character, and 
he would probably group all the bald heads to- 
gether whether they came from England, Russia 
or Italy. He would note there were long faced 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



and round faced specimens and consequently he 
might be induced to make a long faced species 
and a round faced species. Red-haired people 
woud almost certainly be classified as a distinct 
variety or species. Bery likely all the marks which 
we know as characteristic of youth and old age 
would be mistaken for specific markings. We 
smile when we think a museum chimpanzee could 
be so foolish but are we not doing just the same 
kind of thing? We see that such mistakes could 
not be made if the chimpanzee zoologist came to 
Europe and studied us as we live in our several 
countries. He would discover the extraordinary 
manner in which we differ individually — that colour 
of hair, baldness, shape of face, distribution of 
hair pigmentation were not really reliable indica- 
tions of difference of breed. He would perceive, 
however, after a prolonged study that the breeds 
of men varied as he passed from country or region 
of Europe to another, and that there are well 
marked local varieties of Europeans. To know 
the breed the examination of one specimen is not 
enough; we must know a dozen or more from the 
same locality. 

Now it is not possible for many of us tx> go 
to Africa and study chimpanzees in the great terri- 
tory they inhabit — a territory which represents in 
extent about 20 Englands, but if we were in- 
formed of the exact locality from which every 
imported chimpanzee has been derived we should 
soon be in a position to tell the true specific mark- 
ings of all races of chimpanzees. I am certain 
there must be a great number of very different 
kinds — varying according to the regions from 
which they come. Lord Rothschild is of opinion 
that four or five different species may inhabit the 
same region— living side by side without mixing. 
" Zoe," for instance, comes from Angola (Loanda); 
she has a triangular hairless patch on her fore- 
head — the base of the triangle being above the 
orbits, its apea high up in a central parting on 
the crown. "Gilbert" and "Philip" come from 
the region of the Gambia. 

Unfortunately, I made no notes of the exact 
colour of the hair on the crown, back and limbs, 
nor of the colour or degree of pigmentation of 
the face round the orbits, round the mouth, and 
round the nose, in your specimens. But I am 
certain if traders and collectors would make an 
effort to obtain accurate information of the dis- 
trict from which their specimens are obtained they 
would no! only increase the value of their stock- 
but also help in the progress of knowledge 

" Philip" has a remarkable deformity ol the 
right foot. At first sight one is led to suppose 
thai only the great toe is present — the rest of the 
toes having probably been bitten off by an irate 
mother. When, however, the foot is closely exam- 
ined, no trace of a scar can be detected, such as 
should be found if the toes had been lost by acci- 
dent. I am of opinion that the foot has been 



deformed not by accident but has been congeni- 
tally deformed — a condition not unlike one occa- 
sionally seen in man — but not yet noted amongst 
anthropoids. 

I am, 

Yours very truly, 

ARTHUR KEITH. 



Old Playbill of a Menagerie that came to 
Bath, December 24th, 1810. 

Dec. 24th, 1810: 

In 

Commodious Yard, 

Walcot Street, 

Bath. 

Most Superb Menagerie. 
S. POLITO 
The celebrated collector of living curiosities begs 
to inform the Nobility, Gentry & Public that he 
has once more brought forward in this city his 
beautiful collection of 

Living Birds & Beasts. 



MALE OSTRICH 
Which surpasses the description of the largest 
ever seen in the Universe; it actually weighs up- 
wards of 300 1 lbs., will reach eleven ft. high, and 
is absolutely the only African Ostrich alive in 
Great Britain. 



The onl 



A NOBLE LION 

of Senegal. 

A BEAUTIFUL LIONESS 

surviver of the original breed of Lions 

in the Tower of London. 



THREE ROYAL TIGERS 

One quite in its infant state, being 8 months old 
was brought to England by the Marquis of 
Wellesly. ' 



A MOST NOBLE PANTHER 
From the riser La Plata in South America. 



A pair of those most singular quadrapeds, 
LARGE KANGAROOS, 

male and female from Hot am Bay. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



A REMARKABLY HANDSOME LEOPARD. 



An uncommon animal recently descovered in the 

interior parts of Bengal, 

THE URSINE SLOTH. 



A RAVENOUS WOLF. 



The Civet and Genet — commonly called Muscovy 

Cats — A real Jackall — The Magot or Great Ape — ■ 

Raccoons — the hneumon — Coatimondi — Agouti, 

and upwards of fifty different animals. 



A pair of Great Emews (Emus, perhaps) or Lin- 

naeus's Southern Ostrich from Van Diemans 

Land, 7 ft. high. 



The Cassowarv of New South Wales. 



A pair of those birds of ancient fame, 
"The Pelicans of the Wilderness." 



A pair of the birds recently supposed to be fabulous 
THE BLACK SWANS. 



The King of the Vultures, supposed to be the 

Phoenix of ancients :■ — 

THE BRAZILIAN VULTURE. 



Several Curasoos from S. America — Great Horned 
Owl from Hudsons Bay, Spoonbill, Storks, Eagles 
and great Variety of other birds of the most splen- 
did plumage in the known world. 



ADMITTANCE ONE SHILLING. 



Admittance at Feeding Time Two Shillings and 
Sixpence. 



Birds & Beasts bought, sold, or exchanged by the 
proprietor. 



JAMRACH'S. 



(Continued from Page 6, No. 9.) 
One of the most exciting of these adven- 
tures took place some thirty years ago. A line, 
full-grown Bengal tiger was deposited, in his 
roung wooden cage, on this very spot at the 
gates, having just been delivered from a ship in 
the docks. The lair at the back was being pre- 



pared for his reception, when, the attention of Mr. 
Jamrach and his merry men being otherwise en- 
gaged, Tigris regalis set his hind quarters against 
the back of his temporary receptacle, and, using 
all his strength, managed to burst out the boards. 
Then he quietly trotted out, and down the main 
street. The sudden appearance of a full-sized 
tiger at mid-day on the pavement of Ratcliff High- 
way was the signal for a general skedaddle, ex- 
cepting on the part of a little boy of about eight 
years of age, who, never having seen a thing of 
the sort before, innocent]}' extended his hand and 
stroked the big cat. A playful tap of the great 
soft paw at once knocked the child upon his face, 
stunned; and, picking him up by the loose part 
of the jacket, the animal was proceeding up the 
next turning, when Mr. Jamrach who had just dis- 
covered the escape, came running up. Empty- 
handed as he was, he sprang at the tiger's neck 
from behind, and, grasping the throat with both 
hands, drove his thumbs into the soft place behind 
the jaw. Mr. Jamrach was an unusually powerful 
man — indeed ,he is no weakling now, though 
nearer eighty than seventy years of age — and at 
his scientific grasp the tiger, half choked, let his 
captive fall, when a couple of heavy blows across 
the eyes from a crowbar thrust into the naturalist's 
hands by an attendant thoroughly cowed the great 
beast, who turned tail and meekly trotted back 
straight into the lair prepared for him, the dcor 
of which stood open for his reception. The little 
boy was without a scratch; but, although £50 
was offered his father as compensation, Mr. Jam- 
rach 's intrepidity was rewarded by an action for 
£500 damages. In the end the smaller amount first 
offered was awarded, and the loss in costs was 
made sweeter by the judge's praise of the defen- 
dant's prompt and courageous action. The mone- 
tary loss had already been discounted by the ar 
rival, in hot haste, the day after the accident, of a 
showman, who gladly paid £300 for the culprit. 
This was no bad speculation on his part, it was 
found, when he had counted up the sixpences re 
ceived all over the country for admission to see 
the "tiger that had eaten a boy alive in Ratcliff 
Highway." 

And, so, with many an anecdote of his own 
and his father's experiences in their peculiar busi- 
ness from Mr. Jamrach the younger, we go up- 
stairs and wander among the stock. This, of 
course, is ever varying in quantity and species, 
but has always some interesting feature. We are 
introduced to a solemn monkey, who salaams 
gravely three times, and then waits to be asked 
to shake hands, which he does with great cere- 
mony. We see porcupines, black swans and ante- 
lopes, and we hear, at the peril of never hearing 
anything afterwards, the noisy cranes. There is 
a Sumatra civet cat, with a small, fox-like head, 
and a magnificent tail; he is not cordial, and snaps 
an awkward-looking row of sharp teeth at us. 
Just behind his little cage is a large one, which 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Hamlin's J&*na0*rw J$taaa*;tttt. 

Published on the 15th of each month. 

Editorial and Business Office (pro tern) : — 

221, ST. GEORGE'S STREET, LONDON, E. 
Telephone: Avenue 6341. 
Telegrams: " Hamlyn, London Docks, London." 



Advertisement Rates, very reasonable, on application. 

The Editor will be glad to receive for publication articles 
and all interesting photos, the imports and exports of all 
stock, and foreign adventures with all wild stock. 



contains a fine, tall guanaco or wild llama. The 
docile-looking creature moves to and fro, behind 
the bars, keeping his eye on us, and pursing his 
mouth the while. Suddenly Mr. Jamrach says, 
"Look out, he's going to spit !" and we all duck 
in different directions with great celerity — only 
just in time. The intelligent quadruped has con- 
ceived a prejudice against the shape of somebody's 
hat, or the colour of somebody's tie, and expresses 
it by spitting, with much force and precision, at 
the offender's face. 

A large increase in the general chatter and 
growl around us announces the approach of an 
attendant with food. The emus and cassowaries 
stretch their long necks as far between the bars 
as possible, and the pelicans and cranes yell agon- 
isingly. A large black panther throws himself 
against the bars of his cage, and gives voice 
unrestrainedly. In contrast to these, the domestic 
cat of the establishment follows the man's heels, 
with much tender purring and a sharp eye to any 
stray fallen morsel. There are other cats here in 
cages — cats too valuable to be allowed to run loose 
— magnificest Angoras and Carthusians, who rub 
their heads against the wires, and, as we approach 
extend their paws in an appeal to be noticed and 
petted. 

We are promised an interesting feeding sight 
downstairs, and we descend to the ground floor. 
Among the more risky speculations of the com- 
mercial naturalist are the alligator and the croco- 
dile. They will sulk and go into a decline on the 
least provocation or without any provocation at all, 
and, being expensive to begin with, often prove 
awkward losses. They almost invariably sulk at 
first, we are told, and, refusing to take food, would 
be likely to get into a bad way unless cured; and 
the curing of a crocodile's sulks is a surprising 
things to see. We find, on reaching the ground 
floor, poor crocodilus laid by the heels and per- 
fectly helpless, lashed immovably to iron rings 
asd posts. His head is ignominiously sat upon 
by a sturdy man in shirl sleeves, who presently 
pokes the end of a crowbar among the big teeth, 
and forcibly prizes I he mouth open into that posi- 
tion of comprehensive smile so familiar to the 
readers of children's natural history books. Then 
another man kneels before the unfortunate reptile 



and feeds him. That is to say, he takes a lump 
of meat weighing five or ten pounds or so, and 
dexteriously pitches it into the aesophagus, after- 
wards firmly and decisively ramming it home with 
a long pole. This is the dinner of all naughty, 
sulky crocodiles, and, after having it served in 
this fashion regularly four or five times, the victim 
gives up sulking as a bad job. He will have to 
swallow, it one way or another, he argues within 
himself, and in that case he may as well take it 
without being tied up, anl sat upon, and insulted 
generally; besides which, he may as well enjoy the 
flavour as swallow all those eatables without tast- 
ing them. Whereupon he reforms and becomes a 
respectable crocodile, taking regular meals, and 
is in time promoted to the Zoological Gardens or 
a respectable meagerie. 

This and other things we see, and we have it 
explained how dangerous animals are transferred 
from cases to permanent cages, and back again. 
To transfer a savage panther or tiger from a case 
to a cage is not difficult. Certain of the bars of 
the cage are raised, the case is put opposite the 
opening, and the side removed. Seeing an open- 
ing, the captive jumps at it, and the bars are at 
once shut down. But to tempt him back again 
into a case, when he has become to some extent ac- 
customed to his quarters, is not always so easv 
a thing. Carefully baiting the case with food 
usually has its effect, if circumstances permit wait- 
ing; but, if not, recourse has to be had to smoke. 
A litttle damp straw thrust between the bars and 
lighted soon makes the lair uncomfortable, and 
then ensues a scene. Eyes gleam, and teeth gnash 
from obscure corners, and presently, with a bound 
and a well, the powerful beast dashes through the 
opening into the case, and is secured. It may be 
easily understood that any little clumsiness or mis- 
take at the critical moment might lead to the case 
being overturned in the rush, or improperly closed. 
Then, with a tiger or black panther worked to the 
highest pitch of frenzy by the fire and sloke, some 
lively adventures would probably take place. 

And so we reach the door into Britten's Court, 
and, with cordial thanks to our entertainers for a 
most pleasant and instructive afternoon, emerge 
into Ratcliff Highway, with its dock labourers, 
its sailors' boarding houses, and its slop-shops. 
(The End.) 



THE SPOTTED PANTHER BIRD. 

By Frank Finn. 
Many birds have been remarkablj unlucky in 

their names; I think everybody who has seen 

them alive, or even stuffed, in say nothing of 

leading about them, will agree that i| is the Hum- 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



mvng- Birds which ought to have been called 
"Birds of Paradise"; the Amherst Pheasant ought 
certainly to have been the Cilver, as it is a sort 
of silver counterpart of the golden species; and 
the Mandarin Duck might well complain that it 
ought to have been the "Paradise Duck" instead 
of the New Zealand Sheldrake, about which M. 
Rogeron, after carefully describing its tempes- 
tuous disposition in his charming "Les Canards," 
says that he wonders at its receiving such a name, 
since its colour and temper rather point to "the 
other place." 

So it is with the subject of this note; by 
"Spotted Panther Bird" we ought to mean a sort 
of feathered counterpart of the Panther or Leo- 
pard (Panther is simply the Greek name "the all- 
hunter," mosti appropriate for a beast which, as 
Blanford says, "will strike down an ox or bound 
upon a sparrow"). And such a bird should be 
large and powerful, with spotted plumage and 
eyes which gleam with cold rapacity; a bird which 
would pry on feather and fur alike, and never 
relax its relentless grip till the miserable victim 
had yielded its last breath under the grip of its 
iron talons, etc, etc. 

The Martial Hawk Eagle (Spizaitus bellico- 
sus) of Africa would fill the bill nicely; but what, 
as a matter of fact, has been called the "Spotted 
Panther Bird" ? A little Australian bird of much 
the same size and habits as our Blue Tit, with 
drab plumage set off with touches of red and yel- 
low, and with the black cap facings set off by a 
sprinkling of white spots. The spotting is all it 
has of the Panther; and, as a matter of fact, the 
name "Panther Bird" is "made in Germany," and 
is a rendering of the scientific name, Pardalotus, 
from pardalis, another Greek name of the Leopard. 

The particular species of which I am writing 
is Pardalotus punctatus — there are several others 
in Australia, but these are less common; and if 
you want to get information about our present 
subject from Australians or Australian books, you 
must ask for the "Diamond Bird," and you may 
have to make it clear that you don't mean the 
Diamond Sparrow, which is quite a different 
species altogether, and now-a-days called in Aus- 
tralia the Spotted-sided Finch. The Diamond 
Bird proper is an insect feeder, and has much the 
habits of the Blue Tit, but, though also nesting 
in a hole, it builds low down, making its nest in 
a burrow which it tunnels out in a bank, after the 
fashion of our Sand Martin, except that it does 
not bore so deep, and makes a more elaborate 
nest at the end, a domed one, in fact. It is prob- 
ably, like the Blue Tit again, not any too easy to 
keep, although common and widely distributed; 
and on doubt our Editor's idea in asking- me to 
write about it was derived from a story plate from 
the " Avicultural Magaine" of about a dozen years 
ago; for the explanatory article of this plate, when 
I came to look it up, only told of a single pair im- 
ported here by that fine old naturalist dealer, 
Abrahams. 



THE FIRST ENGLISH MENAGERIE. 

By F. J. Stubbs. 

221, St. George's Street, is, in the usual 
sense of the phrase under the shadow of the Tower 
of London, a place that was for centuries the home 
of our greatest menagerie. When it commenced 
we do not know, and probably ever since the Tower 
was built, right up to a hundred years ago, wild 
animals of one kind or another were kept within 
its walls. Seven centuries ago the Emperor 
Frederick sent our own Henry III. a present of 
three leopards, a graceful compliment to the royal 
armorial bearings. Then, and for years after, the 
lion of England was by heralds supposed to be a 
leopard. The same king added a polar bear to the 
collection, with a daily pension of fourpence a day 
for his keep (food was cheap in the 13th century), 
and orders to provide a muzzle and " unam longam 
et fortem cordam, ad tenendum eum ursum, pis- 
cantem in aqua Tamisiae." One imagines the 
keeper hanging on by this long and strong rope 
while his charge went a-fishing in the Thames ! 

Most kings were proud of their menageries, 
and glad to receive donations; but sometimes a 
neighbour could be too kind — even for the third 
Henry, who certainly did not share that failing. 
So when in 12;56 Louis IX. of France sent our 
monarch a huge elephant ("sith most seldom or 
never any of that kind had been seene in Englond 
before that tyme") he very kindly presented it 
to the Corporation of London; and shortly after 
they were the recipients of the following note : — 
"The King to the Sheriffs of London, greeting : 
We command you, that ye cause to be built, with- 
out delay, at our Tower of London, one house of 
forty feet long and twenty feet deep, for our Ele- 
phant." On October 11th, 1257, it is recorded 
that the Sheriffs got a further command "to find 
for the said Elephant and his keeper such neces- 
saries as should be reasonable needful." 

Later on we learn that a royal lion was al- 
lowed a quarter of mutton per day, and a keeper 
got lOJd. per week; but in 1490 the collection had 
so grown in importance that the Earl of Ox lord 
was not above accepting the post of keeper of 
"the lions, lionesses, and the leopard" in His 
Majesty's Tower. 

From scattered records in ancient books we 
can glean many particulars relating to the inmates 
of this Royal Menagerie. In 1609 there were 
several "lustie young lions" bred on the premises; 
and I have encountered records of a litter of cubs 
born on 13th August, 1731, from a lioness and a 
lion born in the Tower six years previously; a lit- 
ter whelped in 1794; and three cubs born on the 
20th October, 1827. \*o doubt a special search 
would discover further records, but the above 
show pretty clearly that our ancestors knew all 
about the art of lion keeping. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



In 1828 was published E. T. Bennett's guide 
to the "Tower Menagerie," copiously illustrated 
from the life of William Harvey. At that period 
the collection was probably at its best, and the 
book describes as actual inmates of the Tower, 
Lion, Tiger, Leopard, Cheetah, Puma, Jaguar, 
Ocelot, Caracal, Hyaena, Wolf, Black Bear, Grizz- 
le}', Bornean Bear, Thibet Bear, various Mon- 
keys, Elephant, Zebra, Rusa Deer, Llama, and 
many smaller animals and birds. There were 
also over a hundred Rattlesnakes, varying in size 
from four feet to six feet. The keeper at that 
time was Mr. Alfred Cops, who seems to have 
been an able and an enthusiastic naturalist. One 
of his methods was to let the lions run loose in 
the yard, where they were petted by the visitors 
— a practice that highly delighted the Duke of 
Sussex on his first visit. 

The menagerie was located in the extreme 
western corner, and demanded so much space, 
and interfered so greatly with the plans for re- 
building the entrance, that in 1831 the Duke of 
Wellington urged its removal. King William 
acquiesced, and presented the animals to the Zoo- 
logical Society, with the wish that such specimens 
as were not required at Regent's Park should be 
sent to the Zoological Society of Dublin. And 
this was the last of a very famous collection. One 
cannot but regret that this ancient royal menagerie 
had not been domiciled at some such place as 
Kew, where it would have had room to expand. 



BLUE FOX FARMS. 



From "The Star," 6th March, 1916. 



The very idea of a fox-farmer is enough to 
cause a thrill of horror in fox-hunting districts, 
but Mr. J. D. Hamlyn, the famous wild beast 
dealer, has a great idea. He can enable you to 
start the business with six blue foxes from Green- 
land, which are now in his menagerie in Shadwell. 

Mr. Hamlyn told a "Star" representative that 
fox-farming could be introduced into Scotland or 
1o one of the islands of the Hebrides, and would 
pay well, ll has been adopted in Newfoundland 
and Prince Edward island, where foxes .ire bred 
for their fur. 



IN FOUR COLOURS. 
1 In- animals arc kepi in large wire enclosures, 
the families consisting of a fox and two vixens. 
Bach forxy family has a separate wire enclosure, 
and when the} become adult they are killed for 
their skins. 



There are white, black, red, and blue foxes, 
and high prices are obtained. 

The blue fox's colour is a peculiar dark blue, 
not unlike the shade of a sailor's serge; but when 
the Arctic winter comes on he begins to shed his 
colour, and the coat takes on a whiter hue in 
order to be in harmony with the white wastes of 
the Polar landscape. In the spring the coats be- 
come blue aefain. 



£26 A PELT. 

Before the war blue fox skins fetched £20 
each in Canada, and now they are £2.2:, owing to 
the international demand for furs. Out of that, 
£7 or £8 is clear profit after paying all expenses 
of the farm. 

The blue foxes are very plentiful in Alaska, 
but Mr. Hamlyn's half-dozen (four foxes and two 
vixens) came from Greenland. When the sealers 
land on the coast there to shoot bear and walrus 
for their furs, they trap these blue foxes, and so 
they reach this country alive. 

The blue fox is smaller than the English 
country gentleman's fox, and not so savage. 



AN IRRITABLE ANIMAL. 

It is a little snappy in confinement, but many 
of us would be a trifle irritable at being shut up 
in Shadwell in the society of a lot of more-than- 
human" chimpanzes and other intellectual won- 
ders. 

Even the prospect of spending a year or so 
in "a lone sheiling on a misty island" in the 
Hebrides hardly reconciles these visitors to their 
present life, but they are in magnificent condition, 
and Mr. Hamlyn boasts that they are looking 
bluer than ever. 

Mr. Hamlyn said his blue foxes are the only 
arrivals of this species in England for a number 
of years. Now is the time, therefore, for anybody 
who would like to try fox-farming in the Hebrides 
to step up with the Treasury notes. 



By the Editor :— 

I have 6 genuine Blue Foxes, 2 White Foxes, 
imported direct from Northern Europe. The sen- 
der advises me as follows : — 

"We have sold our Blue Foxes before 
the War lor £20 each. We have paid our- 
selves £7 and £8 each. The Blue Fox-pelts 
arc here worth up to £22 each." 

I vouch lor the accuracy of the above statement. 
1 prefer to sell them in one lot. Price on applica- 
tion. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

THAT an extremely interesting and gratifying 
event has taken place at the Scottish Zoological 
Park, Corstorphine — the birth of a litter of lion 
cubs. The father of the cubs is "Brutus," the 
fine forest-bred lion presented to the Zoological 
Soicety two years ago by the late Mr. John 
Jordan, and the mother, a later gift from the 
same donor, is also forest-bred; the cubs ought, 
therefore, to be of good type. They are not, 
of course, on view at present, but if all goes 
well with them, visitors to the park will be able 
to see them in some five or six weeks. 

There have been several other interesting 
additions to the collection in the park recently, 
chief among them being three zebus (the small, 
humped cattle of India), presented by the Cor- 
poration of the City of Glasgow; a chacma ba- 
boon, and a coati-mundi, the latter being a car- 
nivorous animal of the bear family, but rather 
resembling the civet. 



THAT a gift of £10,000 has been intimated by 
the Carnegie United Kingdom Trustees for an 
important development of the Scottish Zoologi- 
cal Park at Corstorphine. This handsome grant 
will be devoted to the building and equipping 
of an aquarium upon lines which will probably 
make it the first of its kind in the United King- 
dom. The building of the aquarium will not 
be begun until the war is finished, but in the 
meantime a site has been chosen on the south 
side of the Park, which will place the building 
with its frontage to the main road, and thus 
facilitate the opening of the aquarium to the 
public during the winter evenings when the 
remainder of the Park is closed. The present 
intention is that the aquarium should contain 
both marine and fresh water animal life. 

The Carnegie Trustees have laid down as 
conditions of the grant that the operations 
should be commenced within two years; that the 
building should be associated with the name of 
Mr. Carnegie; and that upon the days when the 
public are admitted to the Park at 6d. per head 
the charge for admission to the aquarium should 
not be more than Id. per head and 2d. in the 
case of parents and small children coming to- 
gether. On other days the Society may fix an 
entrance fee, but no part of the revenue coming 
from the aquarium is to be devoted to the gen- 
eral purposes of the Park. An Advisory Com- 
mittee of the Society is at present considering 
how best the grant can be applied. 



THAT Richard L. Garner, who several years ago 
made a study of the language of the apes in 



the African forests, will soon again take up his 
temporary residence in a steel cage in the 
French Congo region to resume his scientific r ^ -f- 
studies of the gorilla and chimpanzee. His trip) f*^> ^ 
is under the auspices of the Smithsonian Insti-S fait 5, 
tution at Washington and of the New York*- 
Zoological Society. 

Professor Garner will attempt to increase 
his vocabulary of words used by the apes, and 
will carry phonographic records to record the 
language of monkeys. The scientist will con- 
struct a cage of steel rods 5-16th of an- inch in 
diameter, enclosed by a netting of steel wire, 
on a pineapple plantation in the Lake Fernan 
Vaz basin, about two degrees south of the equa- 
tor, and 150 miles from the coast. The cage 
will be covered with branches and leaves, and 
Professor Garner will live in it while pursuing 
his studies. 



THAT a Correspondent has kindly sent me a 
photograph of a Brazilian scientist's snake farm. 
He says : — 

"This symmetrically planned enclosure 
with its curious mounds is alive with poison- 
ous fangs. It is the snake farm of Dr. Vital 
Brasil, of Sao Paulo, Brazil, who is a great 
authority on snake bites and their cure. By 
experiments on the inhabitants of his farm he 
has evolved a cure for almost every variety 
of snake-bite poison known to the South 
American countries." 



THAT Prof. H. G. Plimmer, in a recent report 
presented to the Zoological Society, said that 
there was a considerable reduction last year in 
the death-rate at the Zoological Gardens, the 
numbers being as follows : — mammals, 280; 
birds, 706; reptiles, ITS — representing, respec- 
tively, 21 per cent, 27 per cent, and 29 per cent 
of the total there, including new arrivals during 
the year. There had been two cases of cancer, 
and, we are sorry to say, many birds had died 
from overheating. 



THAT the direct importations into London the 
last month have been practically nil, with the 
exception of the 6 Blue Foxes, 2 White Foxes, 

1 Japanese Bear, 1 Indian Porcupine, and 56 
Grey Squirrels, 7 Basket Pheasants from France 

2 enormous Chimpanzees from Sette lama, 
with a few Grey Parrots. 



THAT the importations into Liverpool : 45 Grey 
Parrots, 20 African Monkeys, with a few Ama- 
zons. 



Printed by W. J. Hasted & Son, (T.U.), 306, Mile End Road, London, E. 



WILLSON'S LIVE STOCK PROVIDERS, Ltd., 

37, New Oxford Street, London, W.C. 

Telephone— Gerrard, 7708. Telegrams-Highbred Westcent, London. Bankers— London County & Westminster. 



LONDON'S CHIEF EMPORIUM FOR DOGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



All our adult dogs are sold on 14 days' trial on condition that if not liked they will be 
exchanged for livestock to value from our stock within this period". 

All our Dogs are daily inspected by a Qualified Veterinary Surgeon. 



.A. YISIT IS RESPECTFULLY RE GUTTIES TIE ID 

E. W. LITTLE, F.Z.S., 

Practical Naturalist and Taxidermist. 

SPECIALIST IN BIG GAME TROPHIES 
— AND FISH MOUNTING. 

Studios: 65, YORK STREET, BAKER STREET, W. 

PADD1NGT0N 6903. LONDON. 

GREY SQUIRRE LS for Sale. 

Direct from North America, per S.S. "Minnehaha" and S.S. " Mesaba." 

FEMALES, 25/6. MALES, 20/6. 

SAFE DELIVERY GUARANTEED. ONLY VERY FEW LEFT. 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 221, St. Georges Street, 

LONDON, EAST. 



f. 



'Q* 



Hamlyns 




MAY 12 



Menagerie 
Magazine 






[ 



No. 12.- Vol. 1. 



APRIL, 1916. 



Price One Shilling 



1 



CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTORY 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

A VANISHED RACE 

THE NEW ZOOLOGICAL PARK AT BUENOS AIRES 

THE WATER ELEPHANT 

SKUNK FARMS IN AMERICA 

THE SCOTTISH ZOOLOGICAL PARK 

ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND 



GENERAL NOTES 



^ 



>Qc 



4 






Telegrams: Hamlyn, London Docks, London. 



Telephone : 6341 Avenue 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East. 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station. 

Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence flye minutes walk. 
P. O.O. payable at Leman Street, East. Cheques crossed " London County &> Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TERMS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from time of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back. TELEPHONE. — Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LE ITERS. — Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIVERY. — Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING:. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

For the arrivals from abroad during the past month. ' Full Particulars are given 



General Notes.' 



Arrivals the last 4 weeks.— 3 Lions, 14 months old. 1 
Lioness, 14 months old. 1 Chimpanzee, female. 3 Bennetts 
Kangaroos. 1 Himalyan Bear. 1 Large Anabis Baboon. 1 
Large Senegal Baboon. 5 Dog-faced Baboons. 2 Vervets. 2 
Monas. 1 Diana. 1 Putty-nosed 3 Hamadrias. 1 Mangabey. 
1 Mandrill. 6 Rhesus. 2 Macaques. 1 Barbary Ape. 2 Lemurs. 

1 Meercat. 1 Hyrax. 25 White Swans. 1,200 Green Budgeri- 
gars. 300 Yellow Budgerigars. 3 Greater Birds of Paradise. 

2 White Peacocks. 3 ordinary Peacocks. 5 Canadian Geese. 
5 Egyptian Geese. 5 Bernicle Geese. 7 Chinese Geese. 2 
Mnscovy Ducks. 6 Turkeys. 2 Guinea Fowls 12 Grey Parrots. 
3,000 Norwich and Yorkshire Canaries. 

The whole of the above stock sold to one buyer. 



Chacma Baboons, African Baboons and Monkeys, Indian 
Monkeys, all have been contracted for three months in advance, 
consequently have none for sale in Great Britain during the 
coming season. 



Chimpanzees :— 
Constantly arriving, ranging from £50 to £150 each. 



Sea Lions, splendid specimens ... ... ... each £35 

My representative brought these over only this week. 



North American Grey Squirrels (Sciurus cinereus. 

Females 25/6. Males 20/6. 
Grey Squirrels thrive in all our London Parks, and the various 
Zoological Gardens. They can be sent safely packed, and deliv- 
ery guaranteed. Early application requested. 
8 Canadian Black White Skunks (Mephitis 

mephitica) ... ... ... ... each 80/6 

These take the place of the Indian Mongoose for rats and 
all vermin. They are entirely devoid of any objectionable 
smell, the scent bacs being abstracted. The only Skunks at 
present for sale in Great Britain. 
Blue and White Foxes, 5 Blue, 2 Whites, all in first-class 
condition. These will only be sold in one lot, £70. 

Canadian Porcupines, very interesting, each, 70/6. 



1 male, adult, Blessbok (Damaliscus albifrons), in 
sound, healthy condition, first direct importa- 
tion for years. Very low price ... ... £30 

1 Red Deer Stag, 2 years old ... ... ... 80/6 

Some tame Fallow Deer for sale. 

4 Green Macaws, very fine ... ... ... each £6 

10 Large Double Yellow Fronted Amazons ... ,, £2 

10 Large Red Fronted Amazons ... ... ,, £2 

Blue Fronted Amazons ... ... ... ,, £2 

7 Red-headed Pope Cardinals, very fine ... ,, 7/6 
1 Glossy Cow Bird— male ... ... ... 7/6 

3 Saffron Finches ... ... ... ... „ 7/6 

1 Whydah, hen ... ... ... ... 7/6 

3 Ruficauda Finches ... ... ... ... ,, 16/6 

Talking Grey Parrots ... ... ... £7, £10, £15 each. 

Ordinary Grey Parrots ... ... £3, £4, £5 „ 

Budgerigars, hens 6/-, cocks 4/- ... ... pair 8/6 

,, Yellow hens 7/6, cocks 5/- 

3 pairs Chilo Wigeon ... 

2 ,, ,, Pintail ... 

1 ,, Bahamas 
2J ,, Red Crested Pochards ... 

2 ,, African Triangular Spotted Doves 
The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at The Zoolog 

cal Society's Gardens, Regents Park, London : — 
2 ,, Alligators, 3J feet each 

2 ,, King Snakes 

3 Hardwickes Mastigure (Uromastix hardwickii) 

4 Cooks Tree Boas (Corallus cookii) 
3 Thick-necked Tree Boas (Epicrates cenchris) ... 

2 Banded Tailed Tree Snakes (Leptophis liocercus) 
6 Angulatcd Snakes (Helicops angulatus) 

3 Giant Toads (Bufo marinus) ... 

8 Bird-eating Spiders (Avicularia avicularia) 

(Extraordinary specimens, seldom imported.) 
2 Gigantic Centepedes (Scolopendra gigantea) ... ,, 12/6 

Only 12 arrived. Early application requested. 



,, 


10/6 


pair 


50/6 


,, 


50/6 


,, 


60/6 


„ 


50/6 




30/6 


Zoologi- 


,, 


70/6 


,, 


25/6 


each 


10/6 


each 


30/- 


,, 


30/- 


,, 


30/- 


each 


25/- 


,, 


12/6 


,, 


20/6 




MAY i% m< 



— T^' 



Hamlgtt's JHatag£rk JBagajta. 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 12.— Vol. 1. 



LONDON, APRIL, 1916. 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

List of Subscribers, for Vol. II., 1916—17. 

John W. Marsden, Thornhurst, Tewit Park, Har- 
rogate. 

R. Scott-Miller, Greenoakhill, Broomhouse, Scot- 
land. 

E. A. Le Souef, Zoological Gardens, Perth, Aus- 
tralia. 

The Lord Rothschild, Museum, Tring. 

The Lady Julia Follett, The Woodside, Old Wind- 
sor. 

Richard Arnold, Tower House, Leigham Court 
Road, Streatham. 

Sir John Bland Sutton, 47, Brook Street, Gros- 
venor Square. 

James Jennison, Belle Vue, Manchester. 

L. Pullar, Dunbarnie Cottage, Bridge of Earn. 

Herbert A. French, St. Margaret's, Downs Park 
West, Bristol. 

Ernest W. Robinson, Liscombe, Leighton Buz- 
zard. 

Mrs. Eva Jordan, Gorthie, Wokingham. 

# * * * 

The full list of Subscribers from the com- 
mencement accompany this number. 

* * * * 

Vol. I., Nos. 1 to 12, can be sent post free 
on receipt of 6/-. The subscription for Vol. II., 
1916—17, is now due, 10/- post free. Kindly fill 
in the accompanying slip and return immediately. 



Dr. Ernst Hartert, The Director, Zoological 
Museum, Tring, writes under date 31st March, 
1916:— 

"This Museum wishes to subscribe to 
Vol. II. and the subscription will be sent in 
due course. 

"May we take this opportunity of sug- 
gesting to you that the paging might be con- 
tinuous from one part to another beginning 
with Vol. II. of your Magazine. 



" It is very useful when a volume is com- 
plete and bound. 

" We also hope there will be a Title-page 
to each Volume." 

I thank this learned gentleman for the sug- 
gestions which shall receive every consideration. 
The binding of Vol. I. will be notified to our 
readers in the next number. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE. 

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who have not received their usual numbers, are 
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the Office of Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son, Strand, 
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By arrangement with Messrs. W. H. Smith 
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HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



A VANISHED RACE. 



THE LAST AMERICAN WOOD PIGEON. 



From an American Correspondent. 

A short time ago there died in the Cincinnati 
Zoological Gardens, at the ripe age of 23 years, a 
passenger pigeon — the last of the American wood 
pigeons, and a terrible example of man's power 
to overthrow the balance of nature and in his 
perversity to destroy the strongest and most pro- 
lific races. 

The passenger pigeon was a bird of rapid and 
sustained flight, bearing with ease the greatest 
extremes of climate, and equally at home in the 
ricefields of South Carolina or the beech mast 
of New York, and so suited to the possibilities 
of life that one breeding migration of 1813 was 
computed to contain 2',2!30, 000,000 birds! The 
woods where they nested often broke under 
their weight, and a whirr of wings was like a 
hurricane. 

The pigeons were a pleasant change of diet, 
and the nesting woods when they were ready 
for flight became a huge camp. For weeks 
■everyone ate pigeon, and as many birds as possi- 
ble were salted for winter use. The railways 
that brough down more and more trappers, and 
provided a ready market for the produce in 
creased the slaughter tremendously. The birds 
brought 6d. or Is. per dozen, but they were so 
easily taken , at nesting-time, or were netted in 
such numbers by cap-nets with a decoy, that the 
sport was well worth while. 

In 1869 the town of Hartford, Michigan, sent 
•off three carloads a day for forty days— a total of 
over 11,500,000 birds — and this at a time when 
their diminution was so> marked that protection 
for the race was under discussion. The bare 
idea of its necessity was in gentral scoffed at; 
what efforts were made were only half-hearted, 
and the flocks continued to diminish with ever- 
increasing rapidity. 

In 1876 there was still a breeding-place 28 
miles long by three or four miles wide. In 1881 
the biggest was only eight miles long. London 
Zoological Gardens got their last representative 
in 1883. Cincinnati obtained the bird that has 
just died in 1892. A wild specimen fell to the 
gun at Detroit on September 14, 1908, and $5,000 
reward has failed to find another. So lately has 
it gone that all the natural histories retain it in 
their pages without comment. The pigeon trap- 
pers, like the pelt hunters who went before them 
and killed off the buffalo*, would not and will not 
credit the result of their folly. They believe that 
the great flocks have but altered their migration 
for a time to> Mexico and will soon return. Then- 
are keeping their hands in by exterminating in 
the meantime other valuable birds whose loss they 
will soon have equal cause to regret. 



THE NEW ZOOLOGICAL PARK AT 
BUENOS AIRES. 

By G. DE Southoff, F.Z.S. 
(Translated by F. Fixx). 

The town of Buenos Aires had already pos- 
sessed for a number of years, a magnificently-in- 
stalled zoological garden, the numerous and in- 
teresting collection in which was duly appreciated 
and was the admiration of visitors to the capital 
of Argentina; but the Municipality of this city 
wanted to go further and give Buenos Aires a 
real zoological park. With the rapidity of exe- 
cution which shows well-directed energy, they 
ordered the management of the zoological garden, 
over which M. Clemente Onelli so judiciously 
presides, to convert some waste land situated at 
the south of the city, near the workers quarter 
into a park containing a set of houses for the 
accommodation of the animals, and embellished 
with broad avenues. This park covers about two 
hectares (a hectare is 2 acres, 1 rood, 35 perches) 
and is specially intended for the benefit of work- 
ing people, who will find it a means of instructive 
recreation; thus the Municipality of Buenos 
Aires has undertaken an enterprise of real social 
value. 

The original idea in this establishment is 
that the animals are housed in buildings of classi- 
cal Greek and Roman construction, copied from 
ancient models. The general view of the whole 
is delightful, and very instructive, All the build- 
ings, even those for the sale of sweets, refresh- 
ments, etc., are reproductions of ancient monu- 
ments. One might fancy one's-self in Greece 
or on the Roman Campagna, for the Argentine 
sun gilds the arcades and colonnades with the 
same warm tones. A section of the aqueduct of 
Claudius on the Apponstay houses the carnivores 
under its arcades. An almost exact copy of the 
Erechtheum at Athens serves as an aviary for a 
number of passerine birds. Two Roman pigeon- 
cotes house pigeons which fly loose. Another 
avairy is like the Temple of Vesta. Walking 
along the paths, bordered with myrtles, oleanders 
and acanthus, one comes across a Temple of 
Virile Fortune, another of Jupiter, and other 
splendid architectural works, ornamented with 
decorations and .statues of a pure style, and, 
finally, a statue of the Roman she-wolf which in 
its wholeness stands conspicuous over everything 
in this classical bit of ground. 

The exceptionally favourable climate of 
Buenos Aires allows of a collection comprising 
Monkeys, Lions, Bengal Tigers., Jaguars, Pumas, 
Bears from Syrice and from the Caucasus, 
Wolves, Jackals, and Foxes, as well as of numer- 
ous small South American mammals, living under 
the shelter of these monuments. The wiring is 
light and unobstrusive, and space for the animals 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



has not been stinted, any more than light, and 
they have snug dens hollowed out in the masonry 
of the temples and aqueducts. Birds of all sorts, 
from Condors to Finches, Parrots and Ostriches, 
inhabit the aviaries and enclosures. Siberian 
Cranes, Porphyrios, Bustards, Crested Screamers 
and Water Fowl of various sorts enjoy full liberty 
in the park. This park was opened to the public 
in October, 1914, two years before which date its 
site was unsightly waste land, seldom visited by 
anyone. It is called the Southern Zoological 
Park, and is a worthy complement to the Zoologi- 
cal Garden of the same city. 



THE WATER ELEPHANT. 



SOME NOTES ON SETTE CAMA 
(Continued from No. 3, July, 1915, Page 2). 



Sette Cama always had a strange fascination 
lor me. The Hinterland had never been evplored. 
The Panguins, a celebrated hunting- tribe, were 
very warlike, their country is extremely rich in 
ivory, rubber, and also minerals. They were very 
careful in allowing the White Man to enter their 
territory, and took care that its wonderous re- 
sources were not exposed to the White Adven- 
turers who frequent that region. They, however, 
had a great respect for the English Agent with 
whom I was stopping. When this region was 
very foolishly handed over to the French, this 
Englishman had been in possession of Sette Cama 
for many years; in fact, Messrs. Hatton and Cook- 
son had an establishment there for over fifty years, 
taking occupation after the Portuguese traders 
had left that part of the Coast. Rumour says it 
was the headquarters of the slave trade, but of the 
" Black Ivory" business I know very little. I 
believe it ceased when the Portuguese left. 

There was one serious disadvantage in visit- 
ing Sette Cama. Its wonderful surf. Supposed 
to be the worst landing in South West Africa. 
I well remember when leaving Boma, the capital 
of the Belgian Congo, the English Agent enquired 
my next port of call. I told him Sette C-'ama. He 
very pleasantly enquired whether I was a good 
swimmer, for on his last visit, he swam ashore. 
My landing certainly came up to his description, 
for we were upset after passing the second 
breaker, and miraculously rolled on shore with 
the third breaker. I saw at once it would be im- 
possible to ship any large animals from the 
beach. All landings and shippings were in surf 
boats. The greatest sensation in nil my travels 
was the passing of the three breakers in the Sette 



Cama beach. Whilst there it was nothing unusual 
for the ships officers landing cargo to wear life 
belts, one seldom saw them land without. 

The Agent had a great knowledge of the mys- 
teries of the Hinterland. It was with great diffi- 
culty that he could be persuaded to speak on the 
strange customs and mysterious animals found 
in that region. And so it came about that one 
evening he spoke of a new water animal which 
existed in the region of Fernan Faz. His remarks 
were to the point. He never troubled to mention 
the animal when visiting Europe. The eminent 
zoologists and scientists of the day had already 
decided what animals were in existence, and for 
him to describe or attempt to bring into notice a 
strange animal would be accounted presumption. 
He called up a very intelligent Fernan Faz native 
who had been in the factory with him for years, 
and who, every three months, took stores to the 
factory at Fernan Faz. At first the native declined 
to speak on the matter. That was explained 
afterwards by the fact that this strange beast 
was considered sacred from the White Man. I 
might say in passing that the natives could never 
understand why Chimpanzees, Gorillas, and other 
animals were collected by the White Man. I 
finally explained that all the Chimpanzees and 
Gorillas taken to Europe were trained as sailors 
there. This explanation they accepted. The des- 
cription of the "Water Elephant" is contained in 
the letter below : — 

"The Paris scientific journal 'La Nature* 
lor 14th Jan. contains a note of which the 
following is a translation : — 

"The Water Elephant. — We have just 
obtained additional information with regard 
to the mysterious animal which inhabits the 
lakes of Central Africa, and which the natives 
call by this characteristic name on account 
of its aquatic habits. The following is what 
we have learnt from Mr. Le Petit, one of 
two explorers sent by the Paris Museum of 
Natural History to these little-known regions, 
more especially from the point of view of 
their fauna, as witness the history of the 
okapi. 

" It was at Tomba Mayi on the northern 
shore of Lake Leopold II. that Mr. Le Petit 
saw these animals. That lake is situate on 
the left bank of the Upper Congo, in the dis- 
trict of Lukeni (Belgian Congo). The water 
elephants, which formed a small herd of five 
head, halted at a distance of about 500 yards 
in such a manner that Mr. Le Petit was ena- 
bled to observe them for some seconds before 
they plunged into the lake. The trunk and 
the ears are remarkably short; the neck, on 
t he other hand, is longer than in the elephant, 
and the height does not exceed about 6ft.; 
there were no signs of tusks.. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



"The prints of their feet in the mud are 
very different from those of the elephant, and 
natives readily distinguish between the two. 
The animals, when they caught sight of the 
travellers., plunged into the water, and, leav- 
ing only the summits of their heads and 
their trunks exposed, swam towards the oppo- 
site shore. 

"These details, coming from a trained 
observer, are sufficiently precise to leave no 
doubt concerning the existence of the animal, 
whatever may be its zoological affinities. 

(Dr.) E. Trouessart. 

"At present," says Mr. R. Lydekker in 
a letter to the 'Times,' "I do not feel dis- 
posed to offer any comment on this extremely 
circumstantial and interesting account." 



To the Editor of "La Nature." 

" Sir. — I wish to corroborate the descrip- 
tion of the above very mysterious animal 
given by M. Le Petit from Lake Leopold II. 
in the Paris Journal 'La Nature' of 14th 
Jan. last. In the year 1905 I was collecting 
gorillas, chimpanzees, antelopes, etc., in the 
Belgian and French Congo, and had the plea- 
sure of meeting M. Le Petit at Brazzaville. 

" He was then following the occupation 
of hippopotamus and elephant hunter in and 
about the region of Stanley Pool. I found 
him a very interesting personage, a great col- 
lector of skins, horns, etc., well acquainted 
with the vast number of strange animals in- 
habiting that region. Having spent some 
time with him, I descended the river and 
worked round the sea coast to Sette Cama, 
French Congo, South West Africa, where I 
found gorillas and chimpanzees in abundance. 

It was whilst there that I made the ac- 
vuaintance of a Panguin hunter. These, I 
might say, are the natives who inhabit the 
interior, some ten miles from the coast. He 
gave me a similar description of a water ani- 
mal which was found in the Fernan Faz dis- 
trict, in a lake which he stated had never 
been visited by white men. The animal's 
size was between a hippopotamus and an ele- 
phant. It lived mostly in the water, and 
could stop underneath or at the bottom some 
considerable time. It was dangerous to ap- 
proach them, for they could destroy a canoe 
easily by means of their jaws; tusks they had 
none. 

"They were hairy, with extremely thick 
hides. They did not frequent or consort with 
either the hippopotamus, elephant, or other 
animals. They were greatly respected by the 
natives, and never hunted, and! no white men 
had ever seen them. On my mentioning this 



to the agent with whom I was living, he 
stated that he firmly believed in their exis- 
tence, but had not mentioned the matter, for 
he felt sure he would be laughed at for giving 
the information. On my return to London I 
mentioned the existence of these animals to 
several eminent zoologists, but they entirely 
repudiated any such animal. 

" It therefore gives me much pleasure to 
know that M. Le Petit five years after sus- 
tains my original statement. — Yours, etc., 

John D. Hamlyn. 
St. George's Street, London Docks, E. 



In conclusion, I have no> hesitation is stating 
that there are stranger animals in West Africa 
than the "Water Elephant," all of which doubt- 
less will be discovered as time goes on. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



SKUNK FARMS IN AMERICA. 

By Pierre Amedee-Pichot. 
(Translated from the Bulletin of the French Ac- 
climatization Society, December, 1915, by F. 
Finn. Continued from Page 3, No. 10, Feb- 
ruary.) 

In November and December each male is put 
to five to twelve females, and pairing takes place 
from February to the middle of March. On April 
1st, each female is lodged in a separate hutch or 
cage. The young are born in the first week in 
May. The young females have four to six young 
at a birth, but their fertility increases with age, 
and some have been known to have as many as 
sixteen. These are born blind and hairless, like 
ferrets, but from the pink and bluish hues of the 
skin one can already see how they will be marked. 
Their eyes open on the seventeenth day, and at 
the age of a month they begin to get about; then 
they get milk to drink. At six months they are 
full grown. 

The pestilential smell of the liquid secretion 
of the Skunk's anal glands have made it the sub- 
ject of various legends in America, where most 
disastrous effects are laid to its charge. Rather, 
let us see what Hudson, a naturalist who has ex- 
plored the Pampas and been intimate with all the 
wild animals there, says about it. According to 
this traveller, the smell of garlic is ambrosia to it. 
This pestilential stench has a more distressing 
effect upon the nervous system than sea-sickness, 
and clingis so, that clothing scented by it cannot 
be used for a long time. Besides, the fluid 
secreted by the Skunk has a corrosive action 
which mav cause loss of sight, at any rate tcm- 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



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porarily, in those who get a few drops of it in 
their eyes. Coves cites the case of several Indians 
who went blind after an accident of this kind, and 
Andubon and Bachman speak of dogs which took 
more than a week to recover after receiving a 
discharge of this terrible secretion in their faces. 
The beast, however, does not bring its battery into 
action without good reason, and tame Skunks, 
which have nothing to fear from those who look 
after them, can be handled without inconvenience. 
The carrying companies in the United States and 
Canada, however, refuse to take live Skunks if 
they have not been disarmed by an operation which 
is now commonly practised, in order to prevent 
the animals from polluting goods with which they 
might come in contact. 

It has long been believed that the odoriferous 
discharge of the Skunk was the urine, but it has 
finally be realised that it was only the product of 
certain glands with which almost all the Weasel 
family are provided, and which in the Skunk are 
particularly well-developed. These glands, which, 
to speak exactly, are small pouches, are two in 
number, placed one on each side of the anus, 
and open into the rectum by a little red nipple 
which in repose is hidden behind the sphincter 
muscle. When the Skunk wishes to use them, it 
turns its tail over its back and the nipples are 
protruded outside, pointed towards the enemy 
like a 75 gun through an embrasure. The mus- 
cular coat of the pouches contracts, and the fluid 
is ejected as a fine spray with such force that it 
covers an area of three or four metres, while its 
scent spreads much further than that. The fully- 
charged pouches, which can work independently 
of each other, can each discharge at least half-a- 
dozen times. 

There are several means of silencing this bat- 
tery. The nipple can be simply cut with scissors, 
or the duct between the pouch and the nipple can 
be divided. The healing process closes the outlet 
of the discharge. The removal of the pouches is 
a more radical measure, but this operation is a 
more delicate one, and in detaching the pouch 
from its muscular envelope with the buttonhook 
used for this operation, care must be taken not 
to interfere with the rectum, to which the whole 
apparatus is closely attached. After being bathed 



a few times with antiseptics, the wound closes up 
in a few days; but it is necessary to operate on 
very young animals, about three weeks old — that 
is to say, just when their eyes have opened, but 
before they have any fur. On grown-up animals 
over a year old the operation may have serious 
results, and only a third of them recover. 

Some breeders do not agree with this disarm- 
ing operation, which they think useless, since a 
Skunk brought up in captivity and used to its 
surroundings never discharges its pestilential fluid 
unless scared by a dog or under apprehension of 
danger, and the men working on the farms can 
pick up their charges by the tail without them 
shewing the least resentment. I even have before 
me the photograph of a pretty American lady 
with a Skunk on her knees, but her expression is 
not exactly one of confidence ! 

When the Skunks have attained their full 
development comes the question of harvesting the 
furs which have been the object of all this diplo- 
matic solicitude. The fur is in its full beauty 
from December to March, and this is the season 
when the animals are killed, either by suffocating 
them in a box filled with illuminating gas or with 
ether and chloriform vapour, or by drowning, 
bearing in mind that any severe or long-continued 
suffering may endanger the beauty of the fur. 
Then the animal must be skinned by a definite 
method, to meet the requirements of the trade. 
The incision in the skin is made between the hind 
legs, along the underside of the tail, and the skin 
is peeled forward towards the head, making a 
case which is put to dry, hair inside, on a shape 
or stretcher made of a board cut so as not to 
stretch the skin, which would make the fur thin. 

The skin of the United States Skunk is of a 
fine and more or less deep black; it has a white 
streak down the middle of the snout, joining a 
wide white cap from which run two white stripes 
which extend more or less in a fork to the rump, 
sometimes right up to the root of the tail, which 
ends in a white tuft. The development of these 
white markings is very variable; sometimes they 
are barely indicated, sometimes they meet at the 
root of the tail or fuse and run up it; sometimes 
all these markings run into each other almost 
from their origin, and the animal has the back 
and the whole tail quite white. The demand in 
the trade being before everything for the black 
furs, all the efforts of the breeder are directed to- 
wards eliminating the white from his stock by 
rigorous selection, which means only using the 
darkest animals for breeding. In this way have 
been obtained furs entirely black or with imper- 
ceptible markings only. The breeder sorts these 
furs into four grades, designated by the commer- 
cial bureau for encouraging Skunk-farming by 
the letters A, B, C, 1). The rare all-black skins, 
along with those whose only marking is a little 
slar on the forehead, are called starred skins, and 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



form grades A and A bis; those with a large 
amount of which are graded as D and D bis. 

Furriers get rid of the white stripes by cutt- 
ing them out and, with great skill, sewing the 
black parts together again; the white strips then 
come in useful for furs of inferior quality. Our 
colleague, M. Diguet, tells us that in Mexico 
Skunks with white backs and tails are most in 
demand; but these animals are of a different species 
from the Skunks of the more northern parts of 
America, and belong to the genus Conepatus, 
whose stench-producing apparatus has been 
studied by M. Chatin, and proves to be exactly 
like that of the United States Skunk. 

In all industries there are produced waste or 
by-products which should not be neglected, for 
they may be prudently and economically employed. 
Just as in a large kennel the droppings are care- 
fully collected for use in tanning, so> in a Skunk- 
farm of any size the excrement of these weases 
constitutes a good manure. The meat of the 
Skunks might serve as a wholesome article of 
food, as may be seen by the use of it by the Red- 
skins, if prejudice did not prevent its being put 
on the town markets; but as the animals are very 
fat when in good condition, an oil is extracted 
from them which is much in demand for soap- 
making, and is even said to be a fine remedy for 
rheumatism. The muscular fibre, after all the fat 
has been boiled out of it, is kiln-dried an^i used in 
making dog biscuits and poultry food. Of course, 
if the Skunks utilized in this way have not been 
disarmed during life, the anal glands must be 
carefully extracted first of all, or they would taint 
with their stench everything they were mixed 
with. 

Mr. Seton has shown that, starting a Skunk- 
farm with five males and twenty females, one 
can have in five years a stock of 800 females and 
200 males for breeding, the produce of which, 
after deducting depreciation of capital, initial ex- 
penses of plant, and expenses of attendance and 
food, should show a profit of 14,000' dollars or 
70,000 francs. Mr. Seton, who has set forth this 
budget with a fulness of detail on which I cannot 
enter here, admits that he has not taken into ac- 
count the possibilities of epidemics and of the fall 
in value of the furs, and he confesses that Skunk- 
farming has never as yet been undertaken on such 
a big scale; but he has based his calculations on 
the results of his own experience in farming Foxes 
and Skunks on a smaller scale. Mr. Seton's fur- 
farm at Greenwich, Connecticut, only embraces 
about 2,000 square metres at present, but he owns 
enough land all round to be able to extend it, 
and next summer it will be enlarged by the addi- 
tion of several 2,000 metre enclosures. His actual 
enclosure is surrounded by a palisade 2l^ metres 
'high; the soil is suitably dry and planted with 
trees which will provide the shade necessary in 
very hot weather. Sixtv-five adult Skunks are 



kept on this farm, of which 50 are females, which 
there is every reason to expect, will produce at 
least 200 young during the coming season. 

It is from Mr. Seton's Skunk-farm that the 
four Skunks came which could have been seen at 
the beginning of last year at the shop-front of M. 
Ruze's great fur emporium, at the street corner 
between Rue de la Chaussee d'Autin and the Bou- 
levard Haussmann. After creating lively interest 
among passers-by, these animals were offered by 
M. Ruze to the Jardin d'Acclimatation, where, 
unfortunately, it has so far proved impossible to 
get them to breed. 

Last year, Mr. Seton having been perforce 
away from home, his keepers fed the animals on 
meat only, with the result that when spring came 
they were much out of condition, and many of the 
dams devoured their litters as soon as they had 
dropped them. We know that wrong feeding 
similarly disposes Rabbits to eat their young. The 
same mishap has occurred to some people in 
England to whom Mr. Seton had sent Skunks 
with the idea of introducing this branch of fur- 
farming into> Great Britain. 

Such vexations would be surely avoided by 
breeders who should follow the practical instruc- 
tions which Mr. Seton has recently given in the 
remarkable series of articles which he has pub- 
lished in the A mer i can magazine, " Forest and 
Stream," the author, w!k> had already given us, 
in two fine volumes, the " Life-histories of North- 
ern x\nimals," enters, in these fresh researches, 
into the most minute details on the method of 
making the enclosures and the way to look after 
the animals, the industrial exploitation of which 
has made such strides during the last few years 
that we may expect to see the skins of fur-bearing 
animals raised in domestication compete in the 
fur-trade with the products of the hunting of the 
wild animals, the number of which is daily decreas- 
ing. 

The fetid odour of the Skunk's anal glands 
is not the only offence laid to its charge. It has 
been said that its bite communicate drabies, and, 
in 1874 — 75, several American medical men re- 
ported a certain number of cases of hydrophobia 
in Virginia, Michigan, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, 
Colorado, and Texas, which they attributed to 
bites inflicted by our subject. However, as these 
cases of hydrophobia did not manifest themselves 
with the same symptoms as those which charac- 
terize canine rabies, the practitioners who had 
notified this new disease called it "rabies mephi- 
tica" (Skunk-rabies), and thought that there was 
some correlation between the anal secretion of the 
Skunk and the virus of its saliva. These obser- 
vations, which Coves has detailed in his mono- 
graph of the Weasel family, attaching great impor- 
tance to them, do not see into us to rest on a firm 
foundation, and, on this subject, Mr. Seton writes 
to us : — 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



"Skunks behave, with regard to hydro- 
phobia, exactly like other animals; that is to 
say, that when a mad dog traverses the dis- 
trict they live in, they are more likely to be 
bitten than any other animal, owing to the 
slowness of their movements and their reluc- 
tance to run away. In this way it has come 
about that several epidemics of hydrophobia 
have broken out in certain places, but they 
have remained localized in the infected dis- 
tricts. I have never identified this disease 
among Skunks in countries where it could 
have shown itself spontaneously, and I think 
the idea that it could be communicated by a 
healthy Skunk as absurd. I have several 
times been bitten very severely by Skunks, 
and I have done nothing but bathe the wound 
with a solution of peroxide,. Many of my 
friends have been bitten as well, and none of 
them ever contracted rabies." 
To conclude this unsavoury subject, I will 
add that the Skunk's secretion has been, it ap- 
pears, successfully employed against asthma. It 
is said that a pastor was in the habit of treating 
his attacks by inhaling the scent of Skunk-glands 
which he kept in a smelling-bottle ! One day 
when he had recourse to this remedy when he was 
in the pulpit, the stench which pervaded the chapel 
when he opened his bottle was so intolerable that 
his congregation fled in a hurry and the poor man 
was left to conclude his homily by himself ! 

It strikes me that Skunk-glands might have 
their uses at certain sittings of Parliament ! 



XOTE. — To those contemplating Skunk farming 
I beg to refer them to the advertisement on in- 
side cover. There are only twelve left. The 
only arrivals in Great Britain during the past 
three years. They were imported at very 
great expense, in consequence of the frequent 
enquiries and orders biven for thes animals. 
When they arrived, the usual thing happened 
— the supposed buyers began to make offers; 
when these liberal offers were refused, they 
hinted if they waited long enough they might 
get cheaper. I am pleased to say the price 
still remains the same. — Ed. 



THE SCOTTISH ZOOLOGICAL PARK. 

The lion cub born in the Zoological Park, 
Edinburgh, some six weeks ago has now been 
placed on view. Two living cubs were born, 
one of which, unfortunately, died when about 
a day old, but the other one. has thriven extreme- 
ly well, and the group of the mother and cub is 
a very interesting and attractive sight. Another 
very interesting birth which took place in the 
Park recently was that of lour Indian wolf cubs. 



The mother refused to nurse them, and two of 
them died soon after birth, but the remaining 
two are being 1 reared by hand, and are doing well. 
They also will probably be on view at an early 
date. 



ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY 
OF IRELAND. 

The Council met on Saturday, 2i7th March. 
W. E. Peebles, Esq., President, in the chair. Also 
present were : — Prof. G. H. Carpenter, Hon. 
Slec. ;, Dr. MacDowel Gosgrave, Hon; Treas. ; 
Prof. A. F. Dixon, Charles Green, Esq., M. F. 
Headlam, Esq., James Inglis, Esq., Lieutenant- 
Colonel W. E. Johnstone, Dr. Leeper, C. J. M' 
Carthy, Esq., Alfred Miller, Esq., Prof. Mettam, 
Sir F. W. Moore, Dr. O'Carroll, Prof. Scott, 
Dr. Scriven, H. E. Stephens, Esq., Sir R. H. 
Woods. 

The following gifts were noted since March 
16th : — a badger from Dr. Hearn; a Madagascar 
love bird, Mrs., Cusack; a herring gull, Miss 
Blood Smyth; horses for the carnivoira, Messrs. 
Nichols, Sir Horace Plunkett and E. D'Olier; 
apples, Mrs. Cusack, Abbeyleix. Number of 
visitors to the Gardens, 2:,523. Captain Len- 
taigne, 4th Gurkhas, and the Army and Navy 
Club, Piccadilly, was elected a life member of 
the Society, and Colonel Cowan and Mrs. de Gex 
were entered as Garden subscribers. Notwith- 
standing the cold weather on St. Patrick's Day, 
l*,44'2l .'persons passed the turn-stiles, and the 
tea room was kept exceptionally busv supplying 
lunch and tea and coffee. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

That the Zoological Society of London have 
turned Poultry Farmers and Egg Producers. 
They are opening an Exhibition illustrating the 
best methods of Poultry Keeping for Egg Pro- 
duction by the Town Dweller during the spring 
and summer months of 1916, commencing in 
April. May their laudable efforts be crowned 
with success. 

That "George," the well-known multi-coloured 
mandril at the Zoological Gardens, died yester- 
day afternoon after a 10 years' stay there. 

He was forty years old, which was a record 
for a captive monkey, and equivalent to seventy- 
five years of a man's age. 

Concerning "George's" strength, it lias 
been said it took ten men to hold him down, bul 
a Zoological Gardens official doubted whether 
even ten men would have dared the attempt. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



That five Indian wolf cubs born at the Zoological 
Gardens have a sheepdog- for their foster 
mother. 

That our contemporary, "Cage Birds," has 
launched a wonderful scheme for capturing the 
German Canary Trade. 

A start has already been made with a sub- 
scription list amounting up to; the 1st April of 
the sum of £9 4s. 

With such a start comment is superfluous ! 

I cannot do better than print the following 
which appears in "Cage Birds," 1st April: — ■ 

"Sir, — I have read with interest your arti- 
cle entitled "Those Millions of Canaries," and 
would crave your indulgence and space in 
your valuable paper to make a few remarks. 
I do not want to be the proverbial crow, who 
does nothing but croak, but treating it as 
a business proposition, all sides of the ques- 
tion must be carefully studied. 

Let usi first consider how the large quantity 
of Canaries are produced in Germany. In 
the Hartz Mountains and Black Forest dis- 
trict, and even in some of the smaller towns, 
the peasants and the workpeople in fac- 
tories, and other occupations, breed Canaries 
as a side line, just as the peasants spend 
their evenings making wooden toys. Then 
almost, I; might say, from door to door, 
in the autumn, -an agent travels round, 
buying up all the surplus stock. These are 
sent to the coast, and thence shipped to 
England, after classification. I myself have 
bought German Rollers, cocks for 4s. each, 
and hens for Is. 6d. per pair (i.e., 9d. each) 
in the little wicker cages in which they come 
over. This is retail. 

When we consider that they must have 
passed through at least four middlemen's 
hands, what can the breeder have been paid? 
Let us say, for the sake of argument, 3s. 6d. 
per pair, which I consider if anything, over- 
estimated. I think the average British work- 
man would want to earn at least 40s. per 
week. To produce this at 3s. 6d. per pair, 
he would have to breed 1,200 birds each 
season. This is allowing nothing whatever 
for maintenance of stock and young, which 
at present foo dprices would be very heavy. 
Let us say, he should breed 1,500 birds per 
season, to cover everything. To do this he 
would want at least 200 hens, and this means 
each hen rearing 7.5 young ones, which would 
be a very high average. 

Then we must consider the room that 200 
hens would need. As I myself have never 
kept more than 20 hens, I am afraid I cannot 
form anything but a rough idea of the room 
required, but I do not for a moment think 
a cottage would accommodate anything like 



this number. Of this I am sure, that over- 
crowding is fatal. 

A FEW "CAWS." 

Another thing to consider,. Canary breed- 
ing is, I might say, a science, and a man 
cannot walk straight into Canary breeding 
with no previous experience with any hope 
of financial success. Otherwise there would 
be no need of the services of your experts 
to men who have been breeding Canaries for 
several years. 

How do you propose that these wounded 
soldiers .should live for the Ifirst year or 
two, whilst they are gathering experience, 
and multiplying their breeding stock? 

I do not wish to throw cold water on your 
scheme, but I know from seventeen years' 
constant experience that the pitfalls in the 
art of Canary breeding are many and various, 
and breeding cannot possibly be undertaken 
by a novice with any probability of a fair 
livelihood. 

I am a business man, and I understand you 
want this subject treated as a strictly busi- 
ness proposition, not as a philanthropic in- 
stitution, and I therefore say, as a remunera- 
tive side line — excellent, but as a man's sole 
support, worse than useless. 

We must be very careful how we treat 
this subject, or we shall find that we are 
doing the wounded soldiers a lot more harm 
than good. 

Thanking you for the space I hope you will 
accord me. L. E. Howard." 

That some 200 Grey Parrots, including 1 Albino, 
arrived in Liverpool last week. There have 
been a few African Monkeys, with some other 
Greys also during the last month. 

That a very large consignment of Amazons and 
Macaws are shortly expected by a Country 
Dealer. May his enterprise be successful. 

That the arrivals in London lately have been a 
few St. Helena Waxbills with some giant 
Whydahs, 3 Chimpanzees, 25 mixed Monkeys, 

3 Tinamons, 21 White Peafowl, 1 Barbary Ape, 

4 Lion Cubs, 3 Kangaroos, 1,200 Budgerigars, 

5 Rheas, 2 large African Baboons, 1 Hima- 
layan Bear, 25 White Swans, 20 mixed Geese, 
300 Canaries. 

That the arrivals in Hull have been a few Grey 
Parrots and Congo Monkeys. 

That large consignments of animals and birds 
are leaving London fortnightlv for the United 
States. 

That a well-known Amateur received direct a 
consignment of 100 Pintail Nonpariels. 



Printed by W. J. Hasted * Son, (T.U.), 306, Mile Fnd Road, London, E. 



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 



Major Atherley, Croft Castle, Kingsland, Here- 
fordshire. 

Madame Abreu, Habana, Island of Cuba. 

The Director, Royal Zoological Society, Natura 
Artis Magistra, Amsterdam. 

The Superintendent, Zoological Gardens, Alipur, 
Calcutta, India. 

E. H. Bostock, Exhibition Buildings, Glascow. 
John K. Butter, M.D., Highfield House, Cannock, 

Staffs. 

Sir Edgar Boehm, Bentsbrooke, North Holm- 
wood, Surrey. 

Sir John Bland Sutton, 47, Brook Street, Gros- 
venor Square, W- 

Dr. F. D. jBaker, National Zoological Park, 
Washington, D.C. 

F. E. Blaauw, Gooliust, St. Graveland, Hilver- 

sum, Holland. 

H. R. Blackburn, Woodlands, Surrenden Park, 
Brighton. 

Miss E. F. Chawner, Forest Bank, Lyndhurst. 

Professor Carpenter, Royal College of Science, 
Dublin. 

Mrs. Cotton, The Mount, Bishopstoke. 

Walter Chamberlain, Pendock Grove, Cobham. 

Robt. D. Carson, Zoological Gardens, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., U.S.A. 

Reginald Cory, Duffryn House, Swansea. 

I. F. Dewar, 2, St. Patrick Square, Edinburgh. 

Capt. Eliot, Leydens House, Edenbridge, Kent. 

Dr. Elliot, Earlstown, Laicashire. 

David Ezra, Kydd Street, Calcutta. 

W. Edmunds, Coombe Farm, Langton Matra- 
vers, Dorset. 

Lady Julia Follett, The Woodside, Old Windsor. 

Mrs. L. Fielder, 6, Raleigh Gardens, Brixton Hill. 

Guy FaJkner, Westbourne House, Bel ton, Leices- 
ter. 

H. A. French, St. Margaret's, Downs Park 
Street, Bristol. 

Rev. A. H. Glennie, Lavant Rectory, Chichester. 

Miss Hall, 76, Adelaide Road, Hampstead, X.W. 

Miss Howman, 6, Essey Grove, Upper Norwood. 

Rev. Hemsworth, Monks Fryston, S. Milford. 

W. J. Henning, Hillside, New Maiden. 

T. Hebb, Brooklea, Downs Road, Luotn. 

W. A. Harding, Histon Manor, Cambridge. 

H. Ide, Elm Lawn, Eden Street, Kingston-on- 
Thames. 

Messrs. Jennison and Co., Belle Vue, Manchester. 

The Countess of Jersey, Middleton Park, Bices- 



William Jamrach, 65, Lordship Lane, Stoke New- 

ington, N. 
Mrs. E. Jordan, Gorthie, Wokingham. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Tokyo, Japan. 
Alderman J. D. Kiley, J. P., 33, Gun Street, 

Spitalfields. 
G. King, 22, High Street, Whitechapel, E. 
Professor Keith, RoRyal College of Surgeons, 

Lincolns Inn. 
Dr. Lovell Keays, East Hoathley, Sussex. 
C. F. Leach, Vale Lodge, Leatherhead. 

E. W. Little, 65, York Street, Baker Street. 

J. Levitt, Monks Fryston, South Milford, Yorks. 

The Hon. Mrs. McLaren Morrison, Queen Anne's 
Mansions, St. James's Park. 

R. T. McGeah, Mona Lodge, Ramsay, Isle of 
Man. 

J. W. Metcalfe, 68, Brunswick Road, Liverpool. 

Dan Mason, Maisonette, Broadstairs. 

Harry Mitchell, Haskells, Lyndhurst, Hants. 

Miss F. Memory, Hatfield, Herts. 

John W. Marsden, Thornhurst, Tewit Park, Har- 
rogate. 

W. Oakey, 34, High Street, Leicester. 

Mrs. L. D. Powers, 25, Gordon Square, W.C. 

L. H. F. Pullar, Dunbarnie Cottage, Bridge of 
Earn. 

Mrs. C. Prioleau, Loxwood House, Billinghurst. 

Mrs. K. V. Painter, 3240, Fairmount Boulevard, 
Cleveland Heights, Ohio, U.S.A. 

The Director, Zoological Gardens, Rotterdam. 

Gerald Rattigan, Frou Selen Hall, Caersws, Mont- 
gomeryshire. 

The Lord Rothschild, Museum, Tring. 

G. de Southoff, Ley sin, Vaud, Switzerland. 

Dr. Scharff, National Museum, Dublin. 

F. W. Smalley, F.Z.S., M.B.O.U., Challan Hall, 

Silverdale, Carnforth, Lanes. 

J. Steel, M.D., Castlerock, Co. Londonderry, Ire- 
land. 

H. S. Spencer, 109, Barcombe Avenue, Streatham 
Hill. 

W. H. St. Quinton, Scompston Hall, Rillington, 
York. 

A. Steele, 47, Roxburgh Street, Kelso. 

Miss M. Staniland, Hussey House, Boston. 

E. A. Le Souef, Zoological Gardens, Perth, West 
Australia. 

R. Scott Milar, Greenoakhill, Broomhouse, Scot- 
land. 

W. R. Temple, Ormonde, Datchet, Bucks. 

W. 1). Trickett, Lench House, Waterfoot. 



• LIST OF SUBSs 

F. Thorniley, 43, Belgrave Road, New Moston, 

Failsworth, Lancashire. 
A. S. Yates, Bishops Sutton, Alresford, Hants. 
Dr. Van Oort, Museum, Leiden, Holland. 
The Superintendent, Victoria Gardens, Bombay, 

India. 
H. E. Harcourt-Vernon, 15, Clifton Crescent, 

Folkestone. 
S. Williams, 110, Roverway, Palmers Green, N. 



RIBERS— continued, 

H. C. Walker, Tyrie, West Park, Leeds. 

E. Wuiron, 7, Rue Theophile Gautier, ' Neuilly, 

pres Paris. 
Messrs. Willsons, 37, New Oxford Street, W. 
Miss G. Owen Williams, 11, Cambridge Road, 

Lee, S.E. 
Walter Winans, Claridge's Hotel, Brook Street, 

W. 
Captain Woodward, Mayville, Kingston-by-Sea, 

Brighton. 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



Dr. Chalmers Mitchell Zoological Gardens, 

Regents Park. 
R. F. Pocock, Zoological Gardens, Regents Park. 
D. Seth Smith ,, 

Ei. G. Boulenger, ,, ,, ,, ,, 

Editor, "Times," Printing House Square. 

,, "Field," Breams Buildings, Chancery 

Lane. 

,, "Bazaar," Breams Buildings, Chancery 
Lane. 

,, "Cage Birds," Fleet Street, E.C. 

,, "Avicultural Magazine," c/o Publishers. 

,, "Bird Notes," Mitcham. 

,, "Daily Telegraph," Fleet Street. 

,, "Daily Sketch," Shoe Lane. 

,, "Daily Mirror," 23', Bouverie Street. 

,, "Evening News," Carmelite House. 

,, "Star," Bouverie Street. 

,, "Financial Times," Coleman Street. 

,, "Financial News," Queen Victoria St. 

,, "Graphic," Tallis Street, E.C. 

,, "John Bull," Long Acre, W.C. 

,, "Irish Times," Dublin. 

,, "Illustrated London News," Milford 
Lane. 

,, "Morning Advertiser," Fleet Street. 

,, "Manchester Guardian," Manchester. 

Dr. A. G. Butler, 124, Beckenham Road, Becken- 

ham. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Basle, Switzer- 
land. 



The Director, Kew Gardens, Kew. 

The Director, Zoological Gardens, Bristol. 

The British Museum, W.C. 

The Natural History Museum, Kensington. 

The Librarian, University Press, Cambridge. 

The Librarian, University Press, Oxford. 

The Central Museum, Eastern Parkway, Brook- 
lyn, New York. 

G. F. Drake, Cobtree Manor, Maidstone. 

•Monsieur C. Debreuil, 50, Quai Pasteur, Melun, 
France. , 

Societe Nationale D'Acclimatation De France, 
Paris. 

Dr. Ferrar, Zoological Gardens, Dublin. 

Frank Finn, 23, Chalcot Crescent, Primrose Hill. 

Professor Hornaday, Bronx Park, New York. 

Sir Harry Johnston, Poling, Arundel. 

Robert Leadbetter, Hazelmere Park, Bucks. 

Professor Lefroy, Imperial College of Science, S. 
Kensington. 

Sir E. Ray Lankester, Thurloe Place, S. Kensing- 
ton. 

R. Cushman Murphy, Brooklyn, New York. 

Monsieur Pichot, Boulevard Haussman, Paris. 

A. Patterson, Ibis House, Great Yarmouth. 

Le Directeur, Jardin D'Acclimatation, Paris. 

Le Directeur, Jarden des Plantes, Paris. 

The Librarian, Smithsonian Institution, Washing- 
ton. 

G. R. Sims, Clarence Terrace, Regents Park. 

Dr. Scharff, National Museum, Dublin. 

Oldfield Thomas, Bayswater, S.W. 




Hamlyns 
Menagerie 
Magazine. 

f 

! No. 1.— Vol. 2. MAY, 1916. Price One Shilling 






CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTORY 

NOTICE 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

TO MY READERS ... ... 

MY RECOLLECTIONS OF MENAGERIES AND CIRCUSES IN THE PAST 
NEARLY 70 YEARS 

THE BREEDING OF PLUME BIRDS 

WILD ANIMALS AS HOUSE PETS 

THE BIRTH OF AN ELEPHANT AT THE ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS, 
COPENHAGEN 

GENERAL NOTES 



Telegrams : Hamlyn, London Docks, London. 



Telephone : 6341 Avenue 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station. 

Buses pass Leman Street, TO hitechapel, from all parts thence five minutes walk. 
P.O.U. payable at L$man Street, East. Cheques crossed " London County &> Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TERMS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from time of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back. TELEPHONE.— Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS. — Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIVERY. — Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same. 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

For the arrivals from abroad during the past month. Full Particulars are given in " General Notes. 



Arrivals the last 4 weeks.— 2 Russian Bears, 1 Chim- 
panzee, 20 mixed African Monkeys, 600 Budgerigars, 500 Norwich 
and Yorkshire Canaries, 50 Indian Plumhead Parrakeets, 2 
Peacocks, 1 Peacock Pheasant, 1 Reeves Pheasant, 20 mixed 
Pheasants, Pair Mikado Pheasants, 4 Black Swans, 1 Indian 
Mynah, 12 Grey Parrots, 3 Crown Cranes. The whole of above 
stock sold to one buyer. 

Also, 1 very large Coypu Rat, 2 Patagonian Hares, 1 Mon- 
goose, 1 Dwarf Lemur, 1 Large Tabulated Tortoise, 5 Small 
Tabulated Tortoises, 2 Adorned Terrapins, 1 Gopher Tortoise, 4 
Brazilian Dwarf Herons, 2 Brazilian' Blue Fowl, 24 Rufous 
Pigeons, 2 Marabon Storks, 13 various Macaws, 20 fine Mexican 
Parrots. Fresh arrivals daily. 



Chacma Baboons, African Baboons and Monkeys, Indian 
Monkeys, all have been contracted for three months in advance, 
consequently have none for sale in Great Britain during the 
coming season. 



Direct consignment shortly arriving from Calcutta, Monkeys, 
Hyaenas, Leopards, Snakes, Collection of Indian Birds and other 
stock. 



NOTE. — Do not dispose of any duplicates whatever to any 
Zoological or Public Gardens, Amateur or others, until you have 
my refusal. 



Wanted to Buy — 50 Swans, 50 Peacocks, 50 mixed Geese, 
all high colored Pheasants, Antelopes, Indian Cattle, Kangaroos, 
Lion Cubs, ete., etc. Best price in Great Britain given. 



Chimpanzees: — 

Constantly arriving, ranging from £50 to £150 each. 



Sea Lions, 5 splendid specimens sold in one week. 



North American Grey Squirrels (Sciurus cinereus. 

Females 25/6. Males 20/6. 
Grey Squirrels thrive in all our London Parks, and the various 
Zoological Gardens. They can be sent safely packed, and deliv- 
ery guaranteed. Early application requested. 
8 Canadian Black White Skunks (Mephitis 

mephitica) ... ... ... ... each 80/6 

These take the place of the Indian Mongoose for rats and 
all vermin. They are entirely devoid of any objectionable 
smell, the scent bacs being abstracted. The only Skunks at 
present for sale in Great Britain. 
Blue and White Foxes, 5 Blue, 2 Whites, all in first-class 
condition. These will only be sold in one lot, £70. 



Canadian Tree Porcupines, very hardy ... ... each 70/6 

12 only arrived, six sold same day of arrival. These are 
interesting hardy creatures, live anywhere. 
Coypu Giant Rat, very fine 
Patagonian Hare, male, 18 months 
Mongoose, only one ... ... ..,. 

Australian Opossum 

2 Red Deer Stag, 2 years old ... ... ... each 

3 tame Fallow Deer ... ... ... ... ,, 

7 Goats ... ... ... ... ... for 

2 Green Macaws, very fine ... ... ... each 

10 Large Double Yellow Fronted Amazons ... ,, 

2 Yellow cheeked Amazons, rare ... ... ,, 

2 Surinam yellow fronted Amazons ... ... ,, 

4 Illigers Macaws, very fine, tame ... ... ,, 

2 Blue Buff ,, „ ,, 

5 Red Buff 

(2 of the latter have been private property for years.) 
10 Pairs Brazilian Rufous Pigeons, rare ... pair 40/6 

2 ,, ,, Dwarf Herons, very rare ... ,, 120/6 

1 Pair ,, Gallinules, very rare ... ,, 60/6 
Quantity South American Small Finches arriving. Particulars 

on application. 

3 Brazilian Tinamous, very fine ... ... for 

2 ,, Tui Parrakeets ... ... ... ,, 

4 Large Bronze winged Turkeys ... ... ,, 

4 Red-headed Pope Cardinals, very fine ... each 
1 Glossy Cow Bird — male 

3 Saffron Finches ... ... ... 

1 Whydah, hen 
3 Ruficauda Finches ... ... ... ... ,, 

Talking Grey Parrots ... ... ... £7, £10, £15 each. 

Ordinary Grey Parrots ... ... £3, £4, £5 „ 

Budgerigars, hens 6/-, cocks 4/- ... ... pair 8/6 

Yellow hens 7/6, cocks 5/- ... ,, 10/6 

(2,000 Budgerigars sold in one month.) 
The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at The Zoologi- 
cal Society s Gardens, Regents Park, London : — 

2 ,, Alligators, 3£ feet each ... ... each 70/6 

1 ,, King Snakes ... ... ... 25/6 

1 Hardwickes Mastigurc (Uromastix hardwickii) 10/6 

3 Giant Toads (Bufo marinus) ... ... ... ,, 12/6 

8 Bird-eating Spiders (Avicularia avicularia) ... ,, 20/6 

(Extraordinary upecimens, seldom imported.) 

2 Gigantic Centepedes (Scolopendra gigantea. ... ,, 12/6 

1 Large Tabulated Tortoise ... ... ... 30/6 

5 Small ,, ,, ... ... ... „ 20/6 

2 Adorned Terrapins ... ... ... ... ,, 30/6 

1 Gopher Tortoise ... ... ... ... 40/6 

3 Heloderm Lizards, poisonous ... ... ,, 60/6 



100/6 

80/6 

40/6 

40/6 

80/6 

S0/6 

£5 

£6 

£2 

60/6 

60/6 

80/6 

80/6 

80/6 



60/6 
30/6 
50/6 

7/6 
7/6 
7/6 
7/6 
16/6 




Hamljns JEenajjerie JHagajira 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 1.— Vol. 2. 



LONDON, MAY, 1916. 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

List of Subscribers, for Vol. II., 1916—17. 

John W. Marsden, Thornhurst, Tewit Park, Har- 
rogate. 

R. Scott-Miller, Greenoakhill, Broomhoaise, Scot- 
land. 

E. A. Le Souef, Zoological Gardens, Perth, Aus- 
tralia. 

The Lord Rothschild, Museum, Tring. 

The Lady Julia Follett, The Woodside, Old Wind- 
sor. 

Richard Arnold, Tower House, Leigham Court 
Road, Streatham. 

Sir John Bland Sutton, 47, Brook Street, Gros- 
venor Square. 

James Jennison, Belle Vue, Manchester. 

L. Pullar, Dunbarnie Cottage, Bridge of Earn. 

Herbert A. French, St. Margaret's, Downs Park 
West, Bristol. 

Ernest W. Robinson, Liscombe, Leighton Buz- 
zard. 

Mrs. Eva Jordan, Gorthie, Wokingham. 

The Countess of Jersey, Middleton Park, Bices- 
ter. 

The Earl of Lonsdale, Lowther, Penrith. 

C. F. Leach, Vale Lodge, Leatherhead. 

W. H. St. Quinton, Scompston Hall, Rillington, 
York. 

G. de Southoff, Leysin, Vaud, Switzerland. 

John K. Butter, M.D., Highfield House, Cannock, 
Staffs. 

Mrs. Cotton, The Mount, Bishopstoke. 

Gerald Rattigan, Frou Selen Hall, Caersws, Mont- 
gomeryshire. 

Warren Bruce Smith, Aubrey Lodge, Emsworth, 
Hants. 

Linwood Flint, Waterford, Maine, U.S.A. 

A. S. Yates, Bishops Sutton, Alresford, Hants. 

The Hon. E. S. Montague, M.P., Bridge Street, 
Cambridge. 

The Clifton Zoological Gardens, Bristol. 



NOTICE. 

The subscription for Vol. II., 19916^ — 17, is 
now due, 10/- post free. Kindly fill in the accom- 
panying slip and return immediately. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE. 

All Subscribers in Norway, Sweden, Den- 
mark, Spain, Portugal, Switzerland and Holland, 
who have not received their usual numbers, are 
requested to communicate at once with the Editor. 
They will in future receive the Magazine through 
the Office of Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son, Strand, 
W.C. 

# * * * 

By arrangement with Messrs. W. H. Smith 
& Son, 186, Strand, W.C, "Hamlyn's Menagerie 
Magazine" is on sale on the 16th of each month 
at the following Railway Stations : — 

Charing Cross (South Eastern and Chatham 
Railway). 

King's Cross (Great Northern Railway). 

Liverpool Street (Great Eastern Railway). 

St. Pancras (Midland Railway). 

Victoria (South Eastern and Chatham Rail- 
way). 

Waterloo (South Western Railway). 



TO MY READERS. 

"Hamlyn's Menagerie Magazine" now enters 
into the second year of publication. 

It has survived the first twelve months, al- 
though several small minded Amateurs prophesied 
a life of three months. For their especial edifica- 
tion, allow me to- state that the Magazine will 
still be very much alive in 1918. I have received 
support from sources least expected, and to those 
I tender my most heartfelt thanks for advice and 
assistance given. "Hamlyn's Magazine" is the 
onlv one of its kind in the whole world. It is 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



absolutely original. It copies none. It never was 
intended to be a source of profit, and was only 
started because certain Amateurs arrogated to 
themselves the ludicrous idea of "running this 
trade." 

They have, however, made a grievous mis- 
take. These remarks touch once more upon the 
scheme which was on the verge of being foisted 
on the British Public in 1914 of forming a Syndi- 
cate to capture the Wild Beast Trade of the 
world. The capital, I was informed, would be 
.£5, 000. Truly a wonderful and magnificent sum ! 
The amount of intended capital proves their abso- 
lue ignorance of the Wild Beast Trade. Take for 
instance that wonderful collection of animals 
shewn at Olympia three years ago; I refer to 
"The Wonder Zoo." 

The cost of animals alone was about £20,000, 
and even then their owner had not the monopoly 
'of the Wild Beast Trade. Twenty years agoi I 
was the London Agent of one of the largest dealers 
in the world. It was nothing unusual for me to 
handle transports of animals of the values from 
£5,000 to £10,000 each. 

One of my own expeditions to the Congo in 
a very small way was of the value of £21,500. To 
participate in the Wild Beast Trade in normal 
times would mean a capital of £50,000 at the least, 
and that would be only a small venture. In Great 
Britain we are, hampered by too many rules and 
regulations for us ever to capture this trade. Our 
enlightened Government implore- us to carry on 
"Business as Usual." My experience the last 
two years has been that every possible obstacle 
is placed in the way of legitimate trade. Fresh 
regulations appear every week. They are amusing 
if not instructive. It is seldom you can get a plain 
interpretation, for no two officials are ever of the 
same opinion. Still I live and learn and presume 
my readers are doing likewise. It was my inten- 
tion to place before my readers a few remarks on 
the Censor Department, but I have no words in 
my vocabulary strong enough for that particular 
branch of the Service. 

When I inform my readers that Telegraphic 
Bank Drafts have been delayed for a week, and 
longer, they will, I trust, excuse my making any 
further references to this distinguished Depart- 
ment. We all live in strenuous times. 

In conclusion, I have many articles from well 
known writers, which will, I am sure, interest all 
subscribers to "Hamlyn's Menagerie Magazine," 
1916 — 17. The subscription is only 10/-; send it 
along ! 

JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



My Recollections of Menageries and 
Circuses in the past nearly 70 years. 

By John Birkett. 

To me as a boy, when any menagerie or cir- 
cus was announced to visit the town in which I 
was born and brought up, nothing was so import- 
ant as going to see them; I often met them on 
the road, and, when once on the show-ground, 
scarcely left it till their departure. 

Throughout all my life I have had the same 
tastes,, and in consequence think my recollections 
might be interesting, not only to those now in the 
business, but to a large portion of the public in 
general. These recollections of mine go back to 
the early 40 : 's of last century. 

Wombwell's Menagerie is, of course, the 
oldest and beset known name, for it is known on 
the Continent of Europe, the Colonies, and 
America, and is quite a household word. I knew 
the founder, George Wombwell, when I was quite 
a boy, and will treat of him and his three shows as 
I proceed. I remember among Menageries, those 
of Hylton, Atkin, Manders, Batty, Stevens, Sy- 
monds, Day, etc., etc.; Circuses also without 
number, Van Amburgh's, Wm. Cooke's, San- 
ger's, Ginnett's, Barnum's, Hengler's, Xew- 
some's, etc. 

With the exception of Wombwell's Men- 
agerie, the shows of the past were nothing in 
comparison with those we see now. That of Van 
Amburgh, who was the first to combine the beasts 
and circus, was considered a monster affair; but 
you might have put his whole lot into one of the 
tents you see now. Van Amburgh gave a circus 
performance and also himself did the lion perfor- 
mance. He was the first to make a sensation in 
driving eight horses in hand. I remember seeing 
a picture of him driving past Hyde Park Corner; 
this picture I saw some forty years since when on 
a visit to Dumfries. 

In the show business, as in all others, some 
are successful, and other go to the wall. 

George Wombwell commenced life as a shoe- 
maker, and his first venture in the show business 
was the purchase of some snakes, which he ex- 
hibited, and was so successful with them that he 
began his caravan travels. This was in 1805, and 
at his death, which occurred at Northallerton, in 
Yorkshire, in 1851, he had three large collections 
of wild beasts. 

Very shortly before Mr. Geo. Wombwell's 
death the menagerie paid a visit to Kendal, and 
was advertised for two days, but as it became 
known that the ground usually allotted for shows 
to exhibit on was occupied by some refuse stones 
from some buildings, (here was no room for the 
menagerie. Accordingly the Mayor was ap- 
proached, and he gave permission for it to stand 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



in the main street of the town. This street was 
broad, and when the show was built up, only 
room was left for a single cart or carriage to 
pass by — this was in 1849; it would hardly be 
allowed now! 

At his death Mr. Wombwell left three men- 
ageries. No. 1 was carried on by his widow un- 
til 18.65, and was then taken over by Mr. Alex. 
Fairgrieve, a nephew by marriage, and managed 
by him till 1872, when it was sold by auction in 
Edinburgh. The large elephant, Mawragh, was 
bought by Mr. Jennison of Belle Vue Gardens, 
Manchester. When he was to be transferred by 
rail, it was found that he would not enter the 
truck provided for him; consequently the only 
method of travel was by walking, and he did the 
journey thus, in stages, Lorenzo, the lion-tamer, 
being in charge of him. 

Mrs. Edmonds, a niece, became the owner of . 
No. 2>; she took the Crystal Palace Menagerie, 
and carried it on till 1884, when it was sold in 
Liverpool. No. 3 was left to a nephew. 

The Menagerie of Bostock and Wombwell 
was established by Mrs. Jas. Bostock, who was a 
relative of Mr. Wombwell, and was connected 
with his business for some years; eventually the 
Bostock family became the owners of all the re- 
mains of the great show. It is now carried on by 
Mr. EL H. Bostock, whoi also owns a large circus 
travelling in South Africa, and several music halls t 

William Mander's Menagerie was, perhaps, 
the only competitor during my recollection, al- 
though there were several others. Batty 's, with 
seven wagons, was one; this I lost sight of en- 
tirely. Steven's I remember with a small one, 
and again with a larger one, consisting of ten 
wagons; he went over to' Ireland, and this men- 
agerie was disposed of. When I last saw him, 
he had what is called a "Walk-up Show." 

Hylton had a nice little menagerie; Wm. 
Manders was his keeper and lecturer, a careful 
man, who eventually became proprietor. At that 
time, in the early 50's, the lecturer used to wear 
a silk hat, and Manders told me how he used to 
hand round the hat for tips, and ultimately by 
this purchased the show. He was one of fthe 
most successful men in the show business, begin- 
ning with eight small wagons, and continually 
adding to them until, at his death, which occurred 
at Girvan in Scotland, the menagerie consisted 
of sibteen beast wagons and a front scene which 
required nine horses to draw it. He had five ele- 
phants and seven camels. 

Sedgewick's Menagerie is now no small 
affair. I remember him with a waxwork show 
early in the 60's, and saw him with it at Aldershot 
in 1869, when he had a group of performing lions. 
Now, when last I saw the show, I think there 
were thirteen wagons, and very nice ones. 



Symons' was another small menagerie. 

After the death of Macomo, from pneumonia, 
which took place at Sunderland, McCarthy, a one- 
armed man, became lion tamer for Manders; he 
was killed at Bolton in Lancashire in 1871. Sy- 
mons took his place under the name of Lambetti, 
but was with Mrs. Manders only a very short 
time, leaving her and working his own small 
menagerie, "gagging," as it is termed in the show 
business, as "Lambetti, the lion-tamer from Man- 
ders' Menagerie, engaged at an enormous ex- 
pense." 

It has been supposed that most lion-tamers 
meet their death by being killed while performing; 
but this is not the case; I only know of five having 
met this fate in this country. These were Helen 
Bligh, McCarthy, Delia, Tom Bridgeman, and 
Beaumont. Considering the number in the busi- 
ness, and the numerous performances given every 
year, this is a very small percentage. 

When I first remember Day's Menagerie, it 
was a very small one, of some four wagons; but 
he gradually got it up to eight, and at the sale of 
Fairgrieve's (Wambwell's No. 1} he bought the 
living-wagon, in which Geo. Wombwell d.ed at 
Northallertan, and a beast wag-on, which, added 
to what he already possessed, made quite a decent 
show. He advertised it as "Day's, late Womb- 
well's"; in consequence of which Mrs. Edwards 
brought an action against him for using Womb- 
well's name, but lost her case. 

Anderton, who had a conjuring show, col- 
lected a nice little menagerie of e'ight wagons, He 
afterwards added a circus to this. He was a very 
deoent fellow, and I am sorry to say was found 
drowned some years ago. 

With the exception of those of William Cook, 
Hengler and Ginnett, circuses were, until after 
1857, very small in comparison with those of the 
present day. It was in that year that Home and 
Cushing came from America. Their great outside 
feat was driving forty cream-coloured horses with 
white manes and tails; and they were as much 
talked of as Barnum was in later years. The last 
time I saw the show it consisted of sime eight 
wagons in all and Tom Sayers, now their great 
draw. 

To compete with the Americans, William 
Cooke had forty knights in real armour in his 
mid-day procession, and again in the wagons 
drove forty horses in hand. 

Hengler was always to the fore for respecta- 
bility, and when tenting his procession was small 
— the ladies dressed in riding "Blue" habits and 
silk hats, the gentlemen in blue coats and silk 
hats. He had a permanent building in Liverpool, 
and eventually gave up tenting entirely. He 
erected buildings in Glasgow^, Edinburgh, and 
Dublin, and made a considerable sum of money. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Newsome was a competitor of Hengler's in 
some towns, but he never appeared to command 
the patronage that Hengler did. In those days, 
Wallett, as "Queen's Jester," was the talking 
clown, and afterwards had a circus of his own. 



THE BREEDING OF PLUME BIRDS. 

By Frank Finn, B.A., F..Z.S. 

The behaviour of humanity in respect of the 
birds whose plumage is used for millinery purposes 
has generally been very unreasonable; either the 
birds are "worked for more than they are worth," 
and killed off until some have been locally exter- 
minated, though I cannot find that any kind of bird 
has been altogether extirpated and caused to van- 
ish from the list of the living on this account; 
and, on the other hand, those who seek to pre- 
serve the birds have been equally unreasonable, 
and sought altogether to abolish the trade in 
their skins, instead of regulating it in a reason- 
able manner. Such people seem usually to be pos- 
sessors of independent means or offic'lals, and 
these, having a fixed income, are remarkably 
anxious to interfere with the livelihood of those 
who are not so well off. 

Now, in the case of birds which are killed 
for food and sport, it has proved possible, e\ en in 
the old countries of Europe, to preserve and even 
increase the numbers of such species, while at the 
same time taking a heavy toll of them each year; 
this is, as everyone knows, done by furnishing' 
and protecting suitable breeding-areas, and by 
killing off the natural enemies of such birds. In 
addition to this, such birds are often transported 
to countries where they are not naturally found. 
There is no reason why this system of game- 
preserving should not be carried out everywhere 
with respect to birds which are used for millinery, 
in the cases where the bird's whole skin is used, 
or where its plumage could not be humanely ob- 
tained without killing it; but so far, so far as I 
know, nothing has been done in this way. 

In the case of birds, how ever, where only cer- 
tain parts of the plumage are desired, and the end 
of the feather-dealer can be obtained without kill- 
ing the bird, a beginning has already been made 
in the simpler and more satisfactory process of 
farming- such birds and depriving them of their 
produce. The oldest and best-known case of this 
is that of the Eider Duck, which in Norway and 
Iceland is carefully protected for the down which 
the female bird pulls off to line her nest; here onlv 
protection is needed, for the birds feed themselves 
at sea, and all that is needed is to remove the 
down from the nests and clean it. This profitable 
industry might well be taken up here, since the 
Eider breeds on our northern coasts right down 



to Northumberland. It could be easily introduced 
elsewhere, for it is one of the most tameable of 
ducks, and has been reared from the egg, and 
even used to breed in the Zoo many years ago, 
while Mr. St. Quintin has bred it recently. Young 
Eiders need more animal food than ordinary duck- 
lings, but some people have found the old birds 
do Hvell on ordinary duck-food. The Sheldrake 
also is protected as a down-producer on some 
coasts on the Continent, artificial burrows being 
provided for it; and this beautiful duck is more 
widely-spread as a British bird, and more easily 
kept and reared than the Eider. 

Except as down-producers, ducks do not 
come much into the feather-trade, though the 
wing feathers o<f some kinds, such as the common 
Wild Duck and the long "sickles" of the Falcated 
Duck (Eunetta falcata), are frequently seen in 
hats. Ducks, however, like game birds, ought to 
be looked after by sportsmen, as they can easily 
be preserved in localities unsuitable for anything 
else, when all that is wanted of their plumage can 
be obtained without damage to the species from 
those killed in the ordinary way in the shooting 
season. It might be thought that the Mandarin, 
as the gayest of the ducks, would be much used 
in the feather trade, and indeed I wa.s rather horri- 
fied some years ago at finding its plumage adver- 
tised by the pound ! It does not seem to have 
"caught" on, however, for I have onlv twice seen 
Mandarin plumage in a hat — once the head, and 
once a score of fans from the wing — which need 
not, however, mean that ten birds had been 
killed, since John Chinaman in such a case is 
more likely to catch the bird and pull the feathers 
out, as he does in the case of the Kingfisher, which 
is reeased after being despoiled of the blue plum- 
age on the back. At any rate, as far as Man- 
darins go, they will soon be British birds, as 
several land-owners now have them flying free on 
their estates. 

Of course, plucking live birds in this way 
ought not to be allowed, and in the case of the 
Ostrich, which is the best known of birds kept for 
their plumes, though only domesticated during the 
past generation, the plumes are now-a-days cut 
and not plucked, though it is customary to pull 
the stumps just before the bird is due to moult, 
as otherwise it might have a difficulty in shedding 
them; the Ostrich feathers of the trade, as many 
people must know, being the great quills of the 
wings and tail, which feathers are always liable 
to give trouble in moulting to birds if clipped too 
close. The establishment of the Ostrich industry 
has been a great triumph for the cause which I 
am now advocating — the domestication or culti- 
vation of plume-birds. It has relieved the wild 
Ostrich of much relentless and often cruel and 
wasteful persecution, and has exhibited the 
triumph of perseverance over difficulties, since the 
Ostrich takes up a lot of room, and is both nervous 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



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and, in the breeding season, vicious and danger- 
ous. 

I have in several places advocated similar 
treatment of Egrets, the producers of the well- 
known "osprey' plumes, but Egret farming has, 
sa far as I know, not been taken up anywhere but 
by some Natche Indian fishermen in Sind, and I 
can't claim credit for that, as I don't suppose for 
a moment they have ever heard of my views on the 
subject ! However, the great point is they are 
keeping the birds alive for the profit of the plumes, 
and finding it pays to do so; they feed them on 
small fish, which are no doubt a by-product of 
their own industry, and not only rear the young 
of wild birds, but even breed from the captive 
ones which they keep in runs like poultry-pens. 
It would be better to clip the wings of such cap- 
tives and let them roam about and find part of 
their own food, confining them if necessary at 
night in a roofed pen with perches placed low to 
accommodate them when rendered unable to fly, 
and littered with whatever material would best 
blend with their droppings to form manure. 

Small fish are, of course, the best food for 
Egrets, and they can be got almost anywhere; 
but they will also take raw meat and larger fish 
or trimmings cut up, while they also feed on in- 
sects, so that they could really be kept practically 
anywhere, like fowls; water is not necessary, 
except a pan for them to bathe or soak their feet 
at times. Another breeder that might be, and per- 
haps is, kept for its plumes, is the Marabout Stork 
of Africa, which bears under its tail the exquis- 
itely delicate fluffy marabout plumes. This is a 
huge greedy bird, and would only pay to keep 
where a lot of garbage had to be disposed of some- 
how, a job which the Marabout, as a carrion- 
feeder, would undertake with enthusiam. 

Most of the Marabout that is made up into 
articles like stoles, however, comes from the hum- 
ble Turkey, which alone can supply it cheaply and 
abundantly enough — everyone must have noticed 
the fluff which is left on in two bunches on the 
hips even in the otherwise plucked turkeys one 
sees in the shops at Christmas. 

It seems, also, that in France feather-dealers 



will pay a few francs annually to owners of white 
turkeys for the privilege of taking some of their 
fluff, as no doubt this figures somewhere under a 
more high-sounding name. The game and poultry 
tribe of birds are indeed laid under contribution 
very largely by the feather trade, without suffering 
thereby, as they are artificially reared; everyone 
must remember the handsome boas made of cocks' 
feathers that were so. fashionable some years ago, 
and the feathers of the common pheasant seem 
never to go out of fashion completely. Moreover, 
I have of late found that Gold Pheasants are being 
kept in this country by some people for their 
feathers, which are obtained from the live birds; 
and this does not involve any cruelty, for the 
plumage is taken just at moulting time, when 
this pheasant parts with its plumage so abundantly 
that it could hardly be handled at all without los- 
ing a lot of it. 

Kept on these lines, as feather-producers, 
several birds of this family would be a good specu- 
lation, such as the Amherst and Silver Pheasants, 
whose plumage is much in vogue just now, and 
more appreciated than that of the Golden; and no 
doubt some at least of this comes from tame 
birds, both of these species being well established 
among us. Recently also there were to be seen 
here and there in the shops the tail feathers of the 
Blue-eared Pheasant of China (Crossoptilum auri- 
tum), very like dark slatey, rather coarse, egret 
plumes, with drooping heavier tips; this bird is 
said to be kept for the plumes, and ought to be 
imported and bred here. Its loose blue-grey body 
plumage much resembles that of the Crowned 
Pigeon (Goura) and might well be substituted for 
it. The Manchurian Crossoptilum, a brown and 
dirty-white bird, is already kept, but its less 
pleasing plumage would need dyeing. 

Indeed, with tthe art of the dyer, the plum- 
age of birds of the pheasant and fowl tribe would 
really supply all the trade could reasonably want, 
such is the variety of colour and texture they pre- 
sent; while they are easily kept in numbers for 
the plumes, since the males, although so quarrel- 
some when mated, can be kept together for as long 
as one likes if hens are excluded so that there is 
nothing to excite their jealousy. Moreover, they 
are easily bred, and their management is well 
understood. 

It is very doubtful, however, if in the interest 
of bird life and its admirers it would be desirable 
to limit the feather trade to ostriches and the 
pheasants and poultry tribe; for if other birds 
used for their plumage but not kept, or not easily 
kept, for it, were properly looked after as game 
birds are, and only killed, like them, in modera- 
tion, and encouraged in every way during the 
close season, they have a far better chance of 
survival, owing to being regarded as sources of 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



profit, than if confided to the tender mercies of 
naturalists who say they love them, but have so 
far proved singularly helpless at protecting species 
threatened with complete ebtinction. Americans 
have stopped the feather trade in their country, 
and I do not say it did not want stopping on ac- 
count of the apparent impossibility over in the 
States of getting people to> work birds reasonably 
as is done in Europe; it is notorious that their 
game birds and wild fowl are faring no better than 
the plumage birds; for instance, the beautiful Car 
the plumage birds; for instance, the beautiful 
Carolina duck is said to be one of the vanishing 
species — yet we in poor effete old Europe have 
got it domesticated, and can send the Americans 
stock, as has been done within the last decade. 

While thus stopping the feather trade, how- 
ever, Americans have not been able, or have not 
tried, to do anything to stop the absolute exter- 
mination of birds which, unlike the Egrets, all of 
which have a wide range, fust leave the earth alto- 
gether when they are killed out of the States. 
The passenger pigeon has gone, and the White 
American Crane and the Trumpeter Swan are 
said to be fast following it; but, of course, natur- 
alists can't spare time for practical protection 
when they are worrying their heads about Dar- 
winian problems, splitting subspeeds, or wrang- 
ling about which particular crack-jaw dog-Latin 
name should be inflicted on any creature ! The 
fact is, they are not sufficiently controlled by prac- 
tical men; zoologists should be under the thumb 
of the public, and forced to show results, just 
as a doctor or engineer has to do if he is to make 
a living. 

Now and then the amateur, if he employs the 
dealer, does get on to something good; witness 
Mr. Frost's successful trip to Arn and thence to 
the West Indies with a consignment of Great 
Emerald Birds of Paradise for Sir William In- 
gram's islet of Little Tobago. The birds, it seems, 
are still thriving here, and the example should be 
widely followed; there are plenty of islands in the 
Pacific as well as the West Indies where this fine 
bird, the easiest to get and keep, could be estab- 
lished. Its yellow plumes, with the even finer 
ones of its relative, the Lesser Emerald — not such 
an easy bird to procure — are practically all the 
trade wants from the Birds of Paradise, these two 
yellow-plumed kinds being " first and the rest no- 
where" in the shops. As it takes years for the 
birds to get the full plumage, the killing off of a 
large number, at any rate, of these old birds can 
be done without injury to the stock, so that even 
if worked in the free state there need be no exter- 
mination, though Birds of Paradise are so' easily 
kept in large cages, with no more attention than 
Jays, and moult their plumes in such perfect con- 
dition, that if they were not so expensive to buy 
they might well be kept for this purpose only. 



WILD ANIMALS AS HOUSE PETS. 



" JACK," THE JACKAL, 
By Robert Leadbetter. 



"Jack" was Tuchair, his home was Nepaul, 
Some friends of mine sent him home to me in a 
funny little box, in the charge of the butcher, on 
a liner. 

When "Jack" got to London he was awfully 
fat and awfully smelly, so the butcher had been 
good to him. 

Now I should describe him as a particularly 
cute little person, not only in his looks, but in 
his ways. 

Then I think Tuchair jackals are cute — cuter 
than their African cousins. 

"Jack" soon found out I was his friend, and 
I soon found out all the raw meat he had been 
taking was the cause of his being so smelly ! So 
this was altered. 

Soon "Jackie" liked bread and milk, a piece 
of cake, a sweet biscuit, but he always had a little 
meat, of course, and raw bones. We got great 
friends ! 

"Jackie" gave up "cage life," wore a red 
collar, laid on the sofa, ran with the house dogs. 
He could stand up for himself, too, and if he flew 
at the terriers, knew the ear was a good place. 

He slept in my bed room, and had funny little 
ways — he would come and look, satisfy his mind 
I was asleep (because he had been told of this 
before), then one by one, convey boot after boot, 
to some such hiding place, as behind the curtains, 
under an arm chair, or any corner previously 
selected, and all this with scarcely a sound. 

Some nights "Jackie" would be extra careful, 
and come again, midway in operations, try and 
peer to see whether I was still asleep, stand and 
listen, holding one paw up, then hastily resure 
work. I think he thought if he could hide his 
booty without my seeing him, he would not get the 
pat for doing it, or would his hiding place be dis- 
covered- 

Another favourite little game of his was to 
run with anything, and quickly hide it in a fire 
place, laid for lighting, then turn away, and sit 
innocently on the hearth rug. Many were the 
queer places he had to hide his treasures. He 
reminded one of a jackdaw. 

One moon light night, he sat on the floor in 
the middle of my room, threw his head back and 
howled and howled as only a jackal can. But not 
for long- I reached to the candle stick, which 
stood on a table close to the bed, snatched out the 
candle, and threw it at "Master Jack." He was 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



quite quiet after that; but he had been engaged 
eating the candle, I found in the morning. 

All this was in his "cub days." 

When he grew up he became a well-behaved 
jackal. He slept quietly in his basket at night. 
He left my boots alone. He sang no solo*. 

We had "Jackie" for years. He was such 
an amusing pet — so very canny. 



The Birth of an Elephant at the Zoo- 
logical Gardens, Copenhagen. 

In the autumn of 1878 the Zoological Gardens 
in Copenhagen was presented with a couple of 
young Elephants from Siam. They were 5 or 6 
years old and named "Chang" and "Eng." 

The female, "Eng," died after a few years, 
while the male lived and developed into a very big 
and strong animal, but without tusks. Later 
on the garden received another female Elephant 
from Siam called "Ellen," who was supposed to 
have been born in 1893. She was growing un- 
usually fast, and was considered to be imbile in 
1905. Consequently the Elephants were moved 
to a joint room in April, 1905, and after a period of 
gestation of about 22 months, " Ellen" gave birth 
to a male baby on the 9th of December, 1907. The 
little Elephant was called "Caspar." 

The delivery took place at night without any- 
body being present. According to our experience 
here in the Zoo, we do not believe in having a 
watch kept upon the animals in such cases, as it 
only seems to disturb them. We, therefore, pre- 
ferred to leave " Ellen" alone this first time, and 
neither have we had her watched at any of her 
later deliveries. 

The mother took great care of the little one, 
and at one time actually saved him from drowning 
in the water-basin by pulling him out of it by the 
help of her trunk. The baby sucked his mother 
for two years and a half, whereupon they were 
separated. "Caspar" soon became a large and 
strong animal, with good tusks, and after "Ellen" 
had given birth to her second baby, he was sold 
to the Zoological Gardens in .Hanover, where he 
still lives and thrives well. 

"Chang" and " Ellen" were put together again 
in the autumn of 1910, and very soon copulated. 
She <^ave birth to her second baby on the 6th of 
April, 1912, also a male, who was named "Julius." 

This delivery likewise took place by night, 
and as the event had not been expected for a 
month or two, we had made no preparations!. 
The Elephants were still together in the daytime, 
but used to be shut up in separate night rooms. 
Happily the male had ben enclosed in his night 



room a few hours before the birth, or else it would 
have been dangerous work to move him, as he is 
rather a cross and disagreeable old fellow. 

When the watchman entered the Elephant 
House in the morning he found the baby standing 
crying in the feeding-passage, to where he 
had been rolled down between the bars. The 
mother did not seem to care about his crying; she 
was occupied in eating the very large placenta, of 
which she had devoured about half, when the man 
arrived. 

In order to have the mother removed to the 
next room in which she was to stay with the little 
one, it was necessary first to carry him in there. 
It took the strength of four men to do this, and 
now it was doubtful whether the mother would 
accept the baby after it had been handled by so 
many human beings. "Ellen," however, showed 
no alarm, and as soon as she had walked into 
her room, she began fondling "Julius." 

He wanted to suck at once, but he had to 
search for two hours before he — quite by accident 
— found the right place. He tried to suck the 
trunk of his mother and her tail and legs, while 
she did nothing at all to help or direct him. But 
at the same time she was very interested in the 
baby. She went all over him with her trunk 
obviously to make certain to what sex he belonged, 
and if he were sound and well-shaped. And as 
the baby had some obstruction and could not get 
rid of the mecomiun, she carefully helped him by 
putting the finger of her trunk into his anus ! 

As "Julius" was strong and growing well, he 
was separated from the mother already at an age 
of one and a half years. From the birth he had 
been somewhat smaller than "Caspar," and he 
will probably never grow as big as his elder 
brother. Neither are his tusks as large as those 
of the other. But he is far more vivacious, and 
we intend to keep him here in the gardens. 

"Chang" and "Ellen" were moved to a joint 
room for the third time on the 7th October, 1913, 
and with the usual result. One of the periods of 
pairing was about the 1st of June, 1914, and there 
is no doubt that " Ellen" became impregnated by 
that time. But in the spring of 1915 she had 
grown so stout, that one would believe her to be 
very far in the period of gestation. She was then 
separated from "Chang" late in May, 1915. \ s 
time went on, she became exceedingly heavy, so 
that we were almost hoping for twins. But on 
the 3rd April, 1916, she gave birth to only one 
baby after a period of gestation of 22 months. 

The delivery happened in the morning shortly 
before the watchman arrived at 6 o'clock. The 
baby was a male, full-born, hut ever so much 
smaller than anj of the other two previous!) born, 

and he was not able to stand on liis legs. It was 
a pity to sec him crawl 1114 about trying to us Sis 

fore-legs and crying pitifully. Ibis time "Ellen" 
bad not touched the placenta, v hich seemed un- 
small. 



8 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



The mother did all she could to help the baby 
to rise, but without success, and this made her 
angry and irritated. We feared, that in her ex- 
citement she might perhaps trample upon the baby, 
and therefore decided to have h'im taken away 
from her. The mother was not willing to part 
with her young one, so that after he had, been 
taken out between the bars she was very angry 
and tried to jump the high railings. 

The small Elephant was then fed from a 
bottle with cow's milk and cream — an analysis of 
the milk of " Ellen" had showed this to be much 
more fat than cow's milk. The baby took as 
much as 10 litres of milk and 2 ! litres of cream per 
diem, but nevertheless became gradually weaker 
and thinner. At the birth he weighed 138 kilos, 
but after a fortnight he had lost 10' kilos, and his 
legs became so sore through his constant crawl- 
ing. As it was quite clear that the poor animal 
would never be able to stand on his hind-legs, it 
was considered better to chloroform him to death 
on the 25 th April. 

One may ask for the reason why this last 
elephant-baby was so small and feeble. Perhaps 
the answer is that the father, though only 44 or 
45 years old is already showing signs of weakness 
and infirmity of old age. His legs are getting 
thinner every year, and the extensor muscles of his 
trunk are lame, so that it cannot be stretched out 
without swinging it to and fro, and the trunk 
grows more and more slender because of atrophy 
of the extensor muscles. 

"Ellen" has, however, delivered three babies 
in the course of twelve years. By her first preg- 
nancy she was only twelve years old, and by the 
birth of her first born only fourteen years. Since 
then she has had a child every fourth year. 

It is rather difficult to state when pregnancy 
begins, as the Elephants continue pairing for a 
long time — a year or more — after the female has 
become pregnant. But we know for certain 
that the first and the third period of gestation 
lasted 2'2 months. 

" Ellen" is only 23' years old and has already 
given birth to three young ones ! There is reason 
to believe that the same would have happened 1 
if she had been living in freedom; and if she con- 
tinues to bear children only to an age of 40 years, 
she — and every other strong female elephant — 
should be able to get 7 or 8 young ones — a larger 
number than hitherto is reckoned with. 

It is often believed that the Elephants reach 
a very high age, 100 years or more. To my know- 
ledge no Elephant in confinement has lived more 
than SO 1 years, and "Chang" here in Copenhagen 
shows unmistakeable signs of infirmity at an age 



of 44 or 45 years. This shows, perhaps, that the 
longevity of the Elephants has been over-rated. 
W. DREYER. 
Copenhagen Zoological Gardens, - 
3/5/1916. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

That amongst some of my numerous arrivals was 
a Dwarf Lemur. Mr. Pocock, of the Zoologi- 
cal Gardens, gives a most interesting account 
of the little animal in " The Field," as follows : — 
"The Dwarf Lemurs, the daintiest of all 
Primates, are restricted to Madagascar, 
where they may be said to represent the gala- 
gos or "bush babies" of tropical and southern 
Africa. An example of the pretty little 
species commonly called Smith's dwarf lemur 
(Microcebus murinus), has recently been ac- 
quired by Mr. J. D. Hamlyn, and is now ex- 
hibited in the rodent house in the Zoological 
Gardens. The soft woolly coat is delicate 
grey in tint, the hands and feet are white, 
and there is a white stripe, set off bv dusky 
rings round the eyes, extending down the 
centre of the muzzle. It is not much larger 
than the common garden dormouse (Eliomys) 
of Central and Southern Europe, and pre- 
sents considerable superficial resemblance to 
that animal. The ears are long and upstand- 
ing, and the eyes, as is usual in nocturnal 
species, are large, protruding, and circular. 
A noticeable peculiarity is the length of the 
hind foot. As might be expected from this 
modification, the leaping powers of this ani- 
mal are so great that it appears almost to fly 
from branch to branch of the high trees in 
which it lives. Like a squirrel, it builds a nest 
of leaves in the fork of a tree, and there the 
female brings forth her young, which are 
usually two, but sometimes three, in num- 
ber. The nest is also used for the prolonged 
sleep, equivalent to hibernation, in which "the 
animal indulges during the period in Mada- 
gascar, corresponding to the winter of colder 
climes, when the insects and fruits on which 
it feeds are scarce, and difficult to procure 
in sufficient qu«ntities. Before this time of 
repose, and as a nutritive provision against 
it, the dwarf lemur accumulates a quantity of 
fat in the basal half of the tail; and the rem- 
nant of this accumulation is still apparent 
upon the specimen in the Gardens." 
That a large consignment of Brazilian Parrots, 
small birds, amongst which were two Blue 
Macaws, some Marmosets, arrived in Liverpool 
last week. The arrivals from the African coast 
have been a few Monkeys and Grey Parrots, 
with three Crown Cranes. 



Printed by W. J. Hasted ft Son, (T.U.), 306, Mile End Road, London, E. 



WILLSON'S LIVE STOCK PROVIDERS, Ltd., 

37, New Oxford Street, London, W.C. 

Telephone— Qerrard, 7708. Telegrams— Highbred Westcent, London. Bankers— London County & Westminster. 



LONDON'S CHIEF EMPORIUM FOR OOGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



All our adult dogs are sold on 14 days' trial on condition that if not liked they will be 
exchanged for livestock to value from our stock within this period. 

All our Dogs are daily inspected by a Qualified Veterinary Surgeon. 



.A. -VISIT 1 IS BBSPEOTFT7LLT REC^TJESTEID- 

E. W. LITTLE, F.Z.S., 

Practical Naturalist and Taxidermist. 

SPECIALIST IN BIG GAME TROPHIES 
—AND FISH MOUNTING- 

Studios: 65, YORK STREET, BAKER STREET, W. 

PADDINGTON 6903. LONDON. 

GREY SQUIRRELS for Sale. 

Direct from North America, per S.S. "Minnehaha" and S.S. " Mesaba." 

FEMALES, 25/6. MALES, 20/6. 

SAFE DELIVERY GUARANTEED. ONLY VERY FEW LEFT. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN, 221, St. Georges Street, 

LONDON, EAST. 



C* 



y^^c 



t 



Hamlyns 
Menagerie 
Magazine 



No. 2.-Vol. 2. 



JUNE, 1916. 



Price One Shilling 



3 



CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTORY 

NOTICE 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

SPECULATIONS INCIDENTAL TO THE SIEGE OF PARIS 

SOME CURIOUS FACTS ABOUT THE 'GATOR 

THE ADVENTURES OF A SKUNK 

THE STORY OF THE DUBLIN ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS 

THE ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF SCOTLAND 

WAR EFFECTS ON SCOTTISH ZOOLOGICAL PARK 



GENERAL NOTES 



10 
10 
10 

1 1 

12 
12 
14 
15 
15 



6* 



^Oc 



4 



Telegrams: Hamlyn, London Docks, London, 



Telephone : 6341 Avenue 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East. 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station^ 
Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence five minutes walk. 

P.O.O. payable at Leman Street, East. Cheques crossed " London County <~ Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TERMS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from time of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back. TELEPHONE.— Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night, LETTERS. — Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIVERY. — Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

For the arrivals from abroad during the past month. Full Particulars are given in 



General Notes. 



Wanted to Purchase. — Swans, Peacocks, Geese, Rare 
Pheasants, Antelopes, Antelopes, Indian Cattle, Kangaroos, 
Baboons, Monkeys, every description of Animals and Birds for 
prompt. Cash. Do not dispose of any duplicates whatever to any 
Zoological or Public Gardens, Amateur or others, until you have 
my refusal. 

Arrivals the last 4 weeks. — 2 White tailed Gnus, 1 
Hybrid Zebra, 1 Mandrill, 25 Monkeys (various), 1 African 
Porcupine, 1 Chimpanzee, 2 Lemurs, 1 adult Rhea, 2 Kangaroos, 
4 Marabouts, 6 Swans, 7 Peacocks, 20 Pheasants (various), 3 
Gluttons, 2 Pine Martens, 1 Bare eyed Cockatoo, 3 Rosellas, 1 
Prevosts Squirrel, 1 Csram Lorry, 2 Severe Macaws, 28 Double 
fronted Amazons, 48 Olive and Cuban Finches, 3 Mexican 
Starlings, 10 Cockatoos, 250 pairs Budgerigars, 2 Sebastopool 
Geese, I Orange flanked, 1 Rock Parrot, 394 Canaries. 



To arrive on S.S. " Walmer Castle " from South 
Africa, 3 White tailed Gnus, 1 large Antbear first for years, 
several Chacma Baboons and Cranes. 



To arrive from Calcutta. — Rhesus Monkeys, Leopards, 
Hyaenas, Antelopes, Indian Bears, 50 Snakes, 100 rare Indian 
Honeysuckers, Mynahs, Bulluls, Cisoas, Orioles, Barbets, 
Particulars on Application. 



To arrive from New York.- 
American Grey Squirrels, with 
Application. 



-Horse Shoe Crabs, Young 
1 few Parrots. Prices on 



Particulars to hand from West Africa of adult Mandril 
arrive. 



each 



3 Gluttons (Gulo luscus) 

2 Pine Martens (Mustela martes) ... ... ,, £3 

12 North American Grey Squirrels (Sciurus cinereus. 

Females 25/6. Males 20/6. 
Grey Squirrels thrive in all our London Parks, and the various 
Zoological Gardens. They can be sent safely packed, and deliv- 
ery guaranteed. Early application requested. 
6 Canadian Black White Skunks (Mephitis 

mephitica) ... ... ... ... each 80/6 

These take the place of the Indian Mongoose for rats and 
all vermin. They are entirely devoid of any objectionable 
smell, the scent bacs being abstracted. The only Skunks at 
present for sale in Great Britain. 



Blue and White Foxes, 5 Blue. 2 Whites, all in first-class 

condition. ... ... ... ... ... each £10 

4 Canadian Tree Porcupines, very hardy ... ,, 70/6 
Mother and young one for £6. 

Chimpanzees : — 

Constantly arriving, ranging from £50 to £150 each. 



Sea Lions to order only 

5 Mongooses, for rats and all vermin 

Australian Opossum 

2 Red Deer Stag, 2 years old ... 

10 Large Double Yellow Fronted Amazons 

2 Salvins Amazons, rare 

2 Panama yellow fronted Amazons 

2 Uligers Macaws, very fine, tame 
1 Blue Buff ,, 

1 Red Buff 

5 Pairs Brazilian Rufous Pigeons, rare ... 

3 Little Bitterns, very rare, Brazil 

2 Moorhens, ,, ,, ,. 
Cuba Finches each 16/6 
Olive ,, ,, 16/6 

3 Mexican Starlings ... 
3 Saffron Finches 

1 Whydah, hen 
Talking Grey Parrots ... 
Ordinary Grey Parrots 
Budgerigars, hens 6/-, cocks 4/- 

Yellow hens 7/6, cocks 5/- ., H 

(2,000 Budgerigars sold in one month.) 

The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at The Zoologi 
cal Society's Gardens, Regents Park, London : — 

2 ,, Alligators, S.i feet each ... ... each 70/6 

1 ,, King Snakes ... ... ... 25/6 

1 Hardvvickes Mastigurc (Uromastix hardwickii) 10,6 

3 Giant Toads (Bufo marinus) ... ... ... .. 12,6 

S Bird-eating Spiders (Avicularia avicularia) ... ., 20 6 

(Extraordinary specimens, seldom imported.) 

2 Gigantic Centepedes (Scolopendra giganten. ... ,. 12/6 

1 Large Tabulated Tortoise ... ... ... 30/6 

5 Small „ „ 20/6 

2 Adorned Terrapins ... ... ... ... , 30/6 

1 Gopher Tortoise 

3 Heloderm Lizards, poisonous 



each 


£35 




£2 




40 6 


each 


80/6 




60/6 




60/6 


,, 


80,6 




80/6 




SO, 6 


pa.r 


40/6 


each 


30/6 




20/6 


pair 


30/6 




30/6 


each 


20/6 


,, 


7/6 




7/6 


£7, £10. £15eac 


£3, £4, £5 


,, 


pair 








Hamlgtts Jttenagme JBagajmt 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 2. —Vol. 2. 



LONDON, JUNE, 1916. 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 



INTRODUCTORY. 

List of Subscribers, for Vol. II., 1916—17. 
The Earl of Lonsdale, Lowther, Penrith. 
The Lord Rothschild, Museum, Tring. 
The Countess of Jersey, Middleton Park, Bices- 
ter. 

The Lady Julia Follett, The Woodside, Old Wind- 
sor. 

The Hon. E. S. Montague, M.P., Bridge Street, 

Cambridge. 
Sir John Bland Sutton, 47, Brook Street, Gros- 

venor Square. 

Sir Edgar Boehm, Bentsbrooke, North Holm- 
wood, Surrey. 

Major Atherley, Croft Castle, Kingsland, Here- 
fordshire. 

The Clifton Zoological Gardens, Bristol. 

'1 he Royal Zoological Gardens, Dublin. 

Messrs. Jennison and Co., Belle Vue, Manchester. 

The Director, Royal Zoological Society, Natura 
Artis Magistra, Amsterdam. 

The Superintendent, Zoological Gardens, Alipur, 
Calcutta, India. 

The Director, Zoological Gardens, Tokyo, Japan. 

Robt. D. Carson, Zoological Gardens, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., U.S.A. 

Dr. Penrose, Zoological Gardens, Philadelphia, 
Pa., U.S.A. 

E. A. Le Souef, Zoological Gardens, Perth, Aus- 
tralia. 

The Director, Zoological Gardens, Copenhagen. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Rotterdam. 
Dr. F. D. Baker, National Zoological Park, 
Washington, D.C. 

Richard Arnold, Tower House, Leigham Court 
Road, Streatham. 

Lieut. Thomas Buchan, Hepburn, Haddington, 
East Lothian. 

Dr. M. Bernstein, 51, Cazenove Road, Stoke New- 
ington. 



Dr. John K. Butter, M.D., Highfidd House, Can- 
nock, Staffs. 

Mrs. Cotton, The Mount, Bishopstoke. 

W. Edmunds, Coombe Farm, Langton Matra* 
vers, Dorset. 

Herbert A. French, St. Margaret's, Downs Park 
West, Bristol. 

Linwood Flint, Waterford, Maine, U.S.A. 

Miss Hall, 76, Adelaide Road, Hampstead, N.W. 

Miss Howman, 6, Essex Grove, Upper Norwood. 

Rev. Hemsworth, Monks Fryston, S. Milford. 

W. J. Henning, Hillside, New Maiden. 

T. Hebb, Brooklea, Downs Road, Luotn. 

W. A. Harding-, Histon Manor, Cambridge. 

H. Ide, Elm Lawn, Eden Street, Kingston-on- 
Thames. 

William Jamrach, 65, Lordship Lane, Stoke New- 
ington, N. 

Mrs. E. Jordan, Gorthie, Wokingham. 

C. F. Leach, Vale Lodge, Leatherhead. 

P. L. Morgan, W r estfield, Elgin, Scotland. 

Dan Mason, Maisonette, Broadstairs. 

John W. Marsden, Thornhurst, Tewit Park, Har- 
rogate. 

R. Scott-Miller, Greenoakhill, Broomhouse, Scot- 
land. 

Mrs. C. Prioleau, Loxwood House 1 , Billinghurst. 

L. Pullar, Dunbarnie Cottage, Bridge of Earn. 

Ernest W. Robinson, Liscombe, Leighton Buz- 
zard. 

Gerald Rattigan, Frou Sclen Hall, Caersws, .Mont- 
gomeryshire. 

Warren Bruce Smith, Aubrey Lodge, Emsworth, 
Hants. 

G. de Southoff, Leysin, Vaud, Switzerland. 

W. H. St. Quinton, Scompston Hall, Rillington, 

York. 

\Y. R. Temple, Ormonde, Datehet, Bucks. 
W. D. Trickett, Lerich House, Waterfoot. 



10 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Walter Winans, Claridge's Hotel, Brook Street, 

W. 
Captain Woodward, Mayville, Kingston-by-Sea, 

Brighton. 
E. Wuiron, 7, Rue Theophile Gautier, Neuillj k 

pres Paris. 
Messrs. Willsons, 37, New Oxford Street, W. 
A. S. Yates, Bishops Sutton, Alresford, Hants. 



NOTICE. 

The subscription for Vol. II., 19916—17, 
now due, 10/-, post free. If your name is not 
above list, kindly post 10/- without any delay. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE. 

All Subscribers in Norway, Sweden, Den- 
mark, Spain, Portugal, Switzerland and Holland, 
who have not received their usual numbers, are 
requested to communicate at once with the Editor. 
They will in future receive the Magazine through 
the Office of Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son, Strand, 
W.C. 

* •* * * 

By arrangement with Messrs. W. H. Smith 
& Son, 186, Strand, W.C., "Hamlyn's Menagerie 
Magazine" is on sale on the 16th of each month 
at the following Railway Stations : — 

Charing Cross (South Eastern and Chatham 
Railway). 

King's Cross (Great Northern Railway). 

Liverpool Street (Great Eastern Railway). 

St. Pancras (Midland Railway). 

Victoria (South Eastern and Chatham Rail- 
way). 

Waterloo (South Western Railway). 



SHARP SPECULATION IN THE 
SEVENTIES. 

being a translation of an article on the Taxation of 

Commodities contributed to the " Revue Avicole" 

(" Aviculturnl Review") the fortnightly bulletin of 

The French Society of Aviculture. 

By M. Ch. Scelle. 



Parliament has voted a law for the taxation 
of provisions. The object of this law is to obstruct 
and put an end to speculations and monoeuvres 



tending to upset prices, and to allow the depart- 
mental and communal administrations to assure 
the supply of provisions necessary for the support 
of the people at large. 

The Senate, nevertheless, has limited the tax 
to a certain number of commodities; leaving, how- 
ever, to the military authority the ower of extend- 
ing it, in the war zone, to other goods than those 
which are comprised in the list issued. 

A consulting committee, composed of repre- 
sentatives of consumers nominated by the general 
councils and the prefects, of representatives of pro- 
ducers and intermediaries nominated by the cham- 
bers of commerce and the agricultural societies, 
besides the veterinary sanitary inspector and the 
director of the agricultural services, assists the 
prefect, who, although the advice of fhe committee 
is binding, has every qualification for appraising 
the opportuneness of such and such a tax. 

The fact of the taxation of commodities is no 
novelty, and criticisms of inflated prices have all 
ready been made in other times, as is shown by the 
following document, which by chance and by the 
kindness of a friend of ours, a great conservator 
both by nature and by profession, I am allowed 
to bring to-day before the eyes of the readers of 
the "Avicultural Review." 



FRENCH 
REPUBLIC. 



LIBERTY— LOCALITY 
FRATERNITY. 



AUTHENTIC SPECIMEN 

of the infamous 

SPECULATIONS 

incidental to 

THE SIEGE OF PARIS, 

1870—71. 



The Committee of National Defence, animated 
by anti-republican sentiment, and, in addition, 
characterized by a culpable incapacity in adminis- 
tration, encouraged speculation by neglecting to 
requisition and to tax, from the commencement of 
the siege, all the commodities necessary for the 
maintenance of the population of Paris. 

The outcome of this was deplorable excesses; 
speculators conspired to conceal their goods and 
sell them at the opportune moment, at absolutely 
scandalous rates, as can be proved by the follow 
ing eloquent figures : — 



UTHFXTIC 



Elephant's flesh, per pound 

Bear's flesh, for presents, per pound 

One small sucking-pig was sold for 

Garlic, per head 

Half kilogramme of clarified salt butter 



Fr. 

20 

15 

580 



40 



50 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Half kilogramme of fresh butter 

Half kilogramme of mixed vegetable 

100 kilos of wood 

\ kilo of sea biscuit 

1 tin of sardines 

1 tin of French beans 

1 tin of green peas 

1 candle 

}, kilo of preserved beef 

| kilo black pudding (horse) 

1 cock 

1 raven 

100 litres of coke 

1 sheep's brain 

1 cat 

1 cauliflower 

1 carrot 

1 cabbage 

v kilo of mushrooms 

100 kilos of coal 

Charcoal (per bushel) 

i kilo of chocolate 

I truffled turkey 

1 turkey without truffles 

1 endive 

i kilo of Gruyere cheese 

| kilo of galantine (horse) 

I kilo of olive oil 

I kilo of head (horse) 

Dry beans, per litre 

Ham, 500 grammes 

t kilo of bacon 

L rabbit 

1 hare 

1 turnip 

1 fresh egg 

1 goose 

Onions, per bushel 

1 sparrow 

1 pigeon 

1 hen 

1 chicken 

Hare pie, per \ kilo 

Fowl pie, each 

Beef pie 

1 shallot 

1 leek 

Potatoes (per bushel) 

1 rat 

Rice, per \ kilo 

Horse sausage, per .', kilo 

Beet sausage 

Mule and donkev sausage 

Sugar, per \ kilo 

Dog's flesh, per J, kilo 

Mutton, per \ kilo 

Donkey's flesh, per .', kilo 



Fr. 


c. 


40 




butter 12' 




24 




1 


10 


12 


50 


8 


90 


6 







40 


15 




6 




55 




6 




16 




5 




15 




12 




2 


25 


12 




6 




30 




3 




4 




200 




140 




1 


25 


30 




5 


75 


20 





60 




75 




1 


50 


2 


75 


175 




65 




1 


50 


14 




70 




50 




75 




45 




28 




50 




1 


25 


50 




2 


25 


2 




8 




12 




10 




2 




3 


50 


12 




12 





It is easy to estimate, from this view of it, the 
misery which the City of Paris must have suffered 
during the five months of the siege it had to en- 
dure, besides the mortality has never been so high 
as during this dreadful time. 

Property of the Author. A cook, 

On sale with M. Pikeol, wine merchant, at 
the corner of Rue Montmartre and Rue du Crois- 
sant. 



(A kilogramme is rather more than 21bs. English.) 

N.B. — The national guards were getting 1 
franc 50 centimes as pay per day. 



1740, Paris, Edouard Blot, printer, rue Bleue, 7. 
Exact copy, 

Ch. Scelle. 

I have made no change in this curious docu- 
ment as far as. the text is concerned, except that 
in the original the list is arranged in two columns, 
but one could certainly trace some resemblances 
to present circumstances, and the improvidence 
which existed then certainly still survives, to 
some extent at least, in our days. 

Although Paris is not invested and although 
the raiways can bring to the capital the commodi- 
ties destined for it, there being nothing to impede 
the coming and going of the trains, there are 
some articles which command exaggerated prices 
and that quite unjustifiably. 

It is to be hoped that in these cases the appli- 
cation of the law will prove beneficial in the inter- 
ests of the community. 

Ch. S. 



SOME CURIOUS FACTS ABOUT 
THE GATOR. 

By Felix J. Koch, Cincinnati, L'.S.A. 

Next time you get out on some deep, dank, 
Southern bayou and have a moment or so to spare, 
steal off and away from the beaten paths, — lie 
low and bide your time, — and then study the alli- 
gators. 

Though you may have watched them hap- 
hazardly before, you will find such study one of 
the most interesting in all the world. 

Latterly, in fact, the naturalists have been 
engaged in working out the life-story of these 
'gators and have learned some features of gator- 
existence that are well worth one's lime and while. 
" Your real Southern 'gator," one of these savants 
tells us, "should attain a length of fourteen or fif- 
teen feet, the head should comprise one seventh 
of the entire length, and should be hall' as broad 
at the jaws as it is long. 

"The American alligator, again, appears to 
be more voracious and fiercer than the South 
American species; oft times attacking men and 
quadrupeds while bathing, or crossing the rivers, 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



and is said to prefer the flesh of the negro to all 
other foods. 

"During the heat of the day these animals 
normally lie stretched and languid on the banks, 
or in the mud, on the shores of the rivers and 
lagoons; — and as the other natives of such locality 
— the winged ones which sport in the sun ex- 
cepted — are generally at rest at such times, the 
consequence is that, during the day, they capture 
but few animals excepting such as wander near 
them. 

" When evening- comes, however, they begin 
to move and the roaring of the larger ones is 
terrific. It has been aptly described as a compound 
of the sounds of the bull and the bittern, but far 
louder than either, and it grates and shivers on the 
ear, as if the ground were shaking. Whether this 
produces any effect upon the prey of the alligators 
— in making that prey disclose itself by its efforts 
to escape — is not known; and, indeed, harsh and 
terrific as it is, it seems not only to be the common 
noise of the reptiles, but also their love-song, 
which they emit frequently and freely in the pair- 
ing season. 

" At the pairing-period the males engage in 
fierce, though uncouth battles and not — so far as 
has 1 been observed — at any other; so that the air 
inference is that, these are battles of gallantry. 
They usually take place in the water, though in 
the shallows, rather than in the depths, and at 
first, at least, they are bouts of cudgel-play, rather 
than battles with the teeth. When it comes to the 
latter, they are desperate, and the death of one, 
sometimes both, is inevitable. It is said that the 
alligator gets no chance to give a second bite and 
so is little disposed to leave the first one until the 
object seized is fairly under the water. The jaws 
close in the same manner as those of the biting- 
turtles, and they can with difficulty only be 
wrenched asunder. 

"On some occasions the alligators will beset 
the mouth of some retired creek, into' which they 
have previously driven the fish, bellowing so loud 
as to' be heard at great distance. To catch the 
fish, they dive under a shoal and, having secured 
one, rise to the surface, toss it into the air, to get 
rid of the water they necessarily take along with 
it, and catch it again on its descent. 

"Latterly, the demand for the alligator hide 
has risen by leaps and bounds the country ewer, 
and so rapidly are the schools of the creatures 
being reduced, that actual farms for their raising 
are being conducted at tremendous profit. 

"The pictures show some interesting speci- 
mens of these curious and most useful of bavou- 
saurains." 



THE ADVENTURES OF A SKUNK. 

By Mrs. C. Prioleau, F.R.Z.S. 
Last Spring I sent to America for a pair of 
skunks as I wanted to try and breed some as pets. 
They arrived, after being six weeks at sea, in 
splendid condition. I put them into a wired en- 
closure with rabbit hutch, that they could go into 
when inclined. All went well (except that thev 
did not breed) till one day in June, I fed them as 
usual. About an hour after, I noticed that Mrs. 
Skunk was unusually active running up and down 
and biting at the wire. I went into the enclosure 
and found she was trying toi bite through the wire 
to get out, and that Mr. Skunk had already done 
so and had disappeared. A thorough search was 
at once made for a good distance all round the 
enclosure. After some hours we gave it up as a 
bad job. 

One day last month (January) I was asked to 
go over to a farm 6 miles off to see a curious animal 
that had been caught when threshing out some 
corn. On arrival, to my surprise, I saw my long 
lost Mr. Skunk in a cage hanging on the wall. 
He was in first rate condition, well nourished, with 
a beautiful coat, very annoyed at being captured, 
but otherwise not wild. I brought him back and 
introduced him to Mrs. Skunk, but I am sorrv 
to say a few days after he attacked and killed her. 
I shall have to begin all over again, and have asked 
Mr. Hamlyn to supply another female,. 

I should think this case is unique; surely it is 
the first time in Great Britain that a skunk has 
roamed the country side for six months, and come 
to no harm. If only people would take the trou- 
ble to breed skunks I am certain it would be a 
profitable business, not only for their fur, but to 
tame them as pets. They are easy to tame, es- 
pecially the male, who has not got the curved 
teeth that his mate has; thev are far more intelli- 
gent than a lemur or mongoose. 

I have been told that the smell would prevent 
them from becoming popular; this is nonsense, 
with scent sacs removed there is absolutely no 
smell. In America, these animals are kept as pets, 
running- loose in the house like a dog; why cannot 
we do the same in England? At any rate I mean 
to try. 



THE STORY OF THE DUBLIN 
ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS. 

By W. ,\. Henderson-. 



Reprinted from the "Dublin Saturday Herald, 
27th Mav, 1916. 



The dominant feature of the Dublin Zoo is 
beauty of situation. Neither of its models — 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



13 



Hamlin's ffimapvu ^taga^itu. 

Published on the 15th of each month. 



Editorial and Business Office (pro tem) : — 

221, ST. GEORGE'S STREET, LONDON, E. 
Telephone: Avenue 6341. 
Telegrams : " Hamlyn, London Docks, London." 

Advertisement Rates, very reasonable, on application. 



The Editor will be glad to receive for publication articles 
and all interesting photos, the imports and exports of all 
stock, and foreign adventures with all wild stock. 



Regents Park, London, nor the Jardin de Paris — 
can compare with it in this respect. In early sum- 
mer the loveliness of its majestic forestry cannot 
be excelled. Sycamores and chestnut trees abound. 
The grandeur of the latter, with their waxen can- 
delabra tipped with scarlet flame, and the lustrous 
green foliage of the sycamores fill us with ecstasy. 
From the moment we enter the turnstiles till we 
pass through the old-time revolving iron gates, 
its floral and arboreal beauty, its shining lakes, 
and undulating green, lawns hold us in thrall. The 
proposal to form a Zoological Society originated 
with Dr. Whitley Stokes, Professor of Natural 
History in Dublin University. The first house we 
meet in the gardens with the date May 10, 1830, 
was erected to commemorate the foundation meet- 
ing' of the "Zoological, Society of Dublin." This 
historic, gatheriing was held in the Rotunda with 
the Duke of Leinster in the chair. The Surgeon- 
General, afterwards Sir Philip Crampton, delivered 
an eloquent plea for its founding, which was fol- 
lowed with a brilliant speech by Richard Lalor 
Sheil, the great Irish orator. The Catholic Eman- 
cipation Act had just become law. He said : — 
" Now the cause for animosity had passed away, 
and the obstacle which stood in the way of national 
improvement had been removed." He viewed as 
a hopeful sign, this union of citizens of all creeds 
and politics in support of the Zoological Society. 
The Duke of Northumberland, their Viceroy, 
offered the site near the picturesque Deputy- 
keeper's lodge, now included in its buildings. 
D'Alton describes the site "as a romantic piece 
of ground, and no home appropriate or beautiful 
situation could have been selected." There were 
difficulties, however, in securing the sanction of 
the Government. 

PUBLIC MENAGERIE. 

Objections were raised to the establishment 
of a public menagerie in a Royal Park. Thanks 
to the energy and influence of Sir Philip Cramp- 
ton, the grounds were granted. Most of the ani- 
mals were presented by William IV., who was 
scattering the Royal Zoological collections of 
Windsor Castle and the Tower of London;. The 
Gardens were opened lo the public on September 
1, 183.1. The grounds were bounded by the lake 
waters, without fence or boundary wall's, and re- 



mained so or many years. How it came to be 
fenced is rather an interesting story. It was found 
that at night the deer swam acrossi the lake and 
fed on carnations and other succulent but expen- 
sive plants. They had aesthetic tastes, and dis- 
covered that a thing of beauty might also provide 
a satisfying and sweet-smelling banquet. But 
worse followed. These fat, prowling stags ex- 
cited the blood-thirsty carnivora. The savage ani- 
mals turned night into pandemonium yith hideous 
howlings, and dashed against the iron bars of 
their cages in frenzied 1 efforts to lynch and devour 
the carnation eaters. Another circumstance finally 
decided the Council to fence the lake boundary. 
One severe winter skaters took possession of the 
frozen waters, and it was found that hundreds of 
visitors wandered across the ice and viewed the 
animals, neglectful of the customary fee. The 
fence was put up but the available: funds were not 
sufficient to pay the cost. Dr. Haughton, then the 
energetic president of the Society, found a way 
out o this financial difficulty. 

THE SPECIMENS. 
Sir Philip Crampton, a founder and past presi- 
dent, was the recipient of one of the most extra- 
ordinary gifts ever offered to a physician by a 
grateful patient. He was presented with a magni- 
ficent skeleton of a gigantic pre-histbric animal, 
and as a compliment to his healer it was named 
Plesiosaurus Cramptcni. This huge-boned reptile 
about 20 feet long, which had been dug out of a 
pit near Whitby, was offered by Sir Philip to the 
Zoological Gardens and accepted. It was housed 
in a tent-shaped building, and was for many years 
an object of interest to visitors. Dr. Haughton 
persuaded the Science and Art Dept. to purchase 
this exceedingly rare specimen for the National 
Museum, and so the bones of an antideluvian beast 
provided funds for the enclosure of a, modern col- 
lection of animals. Dr. Haughton had great per- 
suasive powers, for he extracted from the Trea- 
sury the large sum of .£4,000 for the use of the 
Gardens. He was also responsible for the Herbi- 
vore House, which he erected with a sum of money 
which he got transferred from the extinct Natural 
History Society to the Zoological. He took great 
interest in the study of Irish Elk, and tin's house 
was built as o memorial. Dr. Haughton took a 
kindly practical interest in the animals. He per- 
formed a highly dangerous operation on an infuria- 
ted tigress, which was suffering exquisite agonies 
from an ingrowing nail. On another occasion a 
notable Dublin citizen had been bitten by a mon- 
key, probably a result of tormenting- it. The story 
is told that when Dr. Haughton heard of the inci- 
dent he drove out to' the Gardens to inquire for the 
monkey. The Haughton House, which was erected 
to his memory, in 1899, was well deserved. The 
hereditary services of the famous Ball family to 
the institution can never be fully estimated or too 
highly extolled. 



14 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



A GREAT NATURALIST. 
Dr. Robert Ball, a distinguished naturalist, 
was appointed honorary secretary in 1837. Sir 
Robert Ball, the Astronomer Royal, was elected 
member in 1861, and President in January, 1890. 
His call to Cambridge in 1892i cut short his five 
years of office. Professor Valentine Ball, C.B*, 
F.R.S., was secretary in 1889, and' Sir Charles 
Ball was President in 1909. Improvements were 
vigorously pushed forward by Dr. Robert Ball, 
who was responsible for many lasting develop- 
ments. It was he who established the weekly 
Saturday morning breakfasts, which are still con- 
tinued. These delightful functions drew together 
in social intercourse most of the notable men of 
the period — scientists, scholars, clergymen, physi- 
cians, soldiers, and wits, and precious memories 
of these morning meetings lingered in the minds 
of those who took part. After breakfast plans 
were discussed, and business transacted. Sir 
Robert Ball tells how much he enjoyed walking 
over from Dunsink to discuss "whether lion cubs 
are old enough to be sold; how rats can best be 
excluded from the aviary; to sign an order for a 
new pole in the bear pit; or a new tub for the 
elephant." In 1904, General Sir Tohn Maxwell 
was a member of the Council, and at a meeting 
described the wonders of the Cairo Zoological 
Gardens, one of the finest in the world, which cost 
two millions of money, and also spoke of the Pre- 
toria Gardens, and Kruger"s objections to lions. 
Dr. Robert Ball also introduced lectures on zoo- 
logical subjects, which were delivered by the most 
distinguished scientists of the period, and finan- 
cially benefited the Society. He also introduced 
penny admission to the Gardens for the working 
classes. The penny admission on Sunday after 
two o'clock was first instituted! in 1840, and fif- 
teen years later the same privilege was extended 
to visitors to the Gardens after six o'clock in the 
summer evenings. 

His biographer has written : "To whom do 
we mainly owe the existence of this garden and 
the penny admission which makes it available to 
us? Let some simple inscription answer the in- 
quirer, and tell to him and his children that the 
name of their benefactor was Sir Robert Ball." 
In 1847 Sir Robert Ball tells us he bought a sloth 
for £15. He writes : " I am afraid it is a bad bar- 
gain, as he has a cold and is sick already. I also 
bought a great snake nine feet long. He was very 
weak, so Cullen got a jug full of calf's blood, and 
we poured it down its throat." In the early days 
when funds were limited, the Council adopted the 
svstem of hiring for a few weeks any of the rare 
or more costly animals which were beyond their 
reach. For instance, we find them exhibiting a 
rhinoceros in the year 1835, which had been 
shipped from Calcutta, and purchased by the 
Iaiverpool Zoo for a thousand pounds. In the year 
1838, when Queen Victoria became patron, the 



name of the Society was changed to the "Royal 
Zoological Society of Ireland." Perhaps the rar- 
est of all animals and the most difficult to keep, 
as far as zoological collections are concerned, is 
the giraffe, and the Dublin Society was lucky in 
securing a very lne specimen — a gift from the 
London Zoological Society. 

THE FIRST GIRAFFE. 

Sir Robert Ball records : "The giraffe arrived 
in Dublin on June 19, 1844. I remember this 
quite well, although I was only four years old at 
the time." A conspicuous house was built in 1846, 
and is known as Albert House, as the giraffe was 
named after the Prince Consort. It is now used 
as an Elephant House. From 1904 to 1909 two 
young giraffes were exhibited in the gardens, the 
property of the Sirdar Sir Reginald Windgate. 
The gorilla shares with the giraffe the distinction 
of rarity, and experience the same difficulty of ac- 
cl'imisation. In February, 1914, the Society ac- 
quired a healthy young gorilla named Empress. 
It is stated that at the time it was the only live 
specimen in Europe. It is only a gorilla in minia- 
ture, but a s.ight of one even in childhood is a 
curiosity. To get an idea of the ponderous bulk 
and savage aspects of these huge anthropoids, we 
must go to the Museum in Merrion Square, where 
there is a fine example. Buried in the gloomv 
depths of equatorial Ofrica, its discovery was long- 
delayed. In 1819 it was first described, about 1847 
it was officially named gorilla, and Du Chaillu, 
who visited Africa in 1855, was the first European 
who killed a gorilla and saw the animal in its 
native haunts. He writes : "I never kill one with- 
out having a sickening realisation of the horrid 
human likeness of the beast." 

(To be continued.) 



THE ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF 
SCOTLAND. 



A CARNEGIE AQUARIUM. 



The annual meeting of this Society was held 
in the City Chambers, Edinbugh, on the 29th May. 
Lord Salvesen presided, and submitted the report, 
which has been already published. They had had 
a period of very considerable anxiety on account 
of their finances during the past year. The early 
summer was not favourable, and there was a large 
drop in the drawings. In addition they had had 
to meet increased expeniiture upon animals' food. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



By way of illustration, the fish had been costing 
them during the whole year practically four times 
what it cost before the war commenced. Prices of 
hay and grain had gone up 50' per cent. To 
counterbalance things, they had effected a consid- 
erable reduction in the number of sheep, goats, 
antelopes, and deer, of which they had a good 
many duplicates, and thereby they had been able 
to keep the expenditure £500 below that of the 
previous year. Their comparatively small surplus 
was therefore due to the admission receipts being- 
no less than £500 below those o<f 1914-15, and to a 
drop o nearly £200 upon Fellows' subscriptions. 
The outstanding feature of the year had been the 
git of £10,000 "by the Carnegie' Trustees for the 
purpose of erecting an aquarium. That had to be 
postponed until the close of the war, but in the 
meantile the money had been deposited for the 
Society's benefit at a half per cent, above the ordi- 
nary bank rate. It was a very fine gift, and he 
looked forward to the aquarium adding greatly to 
the attractions of the park. Amongst the subscrip- 
tions received was one from Lieutenant-Col. W. 
D. Graves, who had sent it from Mesopotamia, 
where he was engaged on active service (applause) 
— and one of their kindest friends. Mrs. Brown 
Anderson, had again sent £50' for general pur- 
poses. Since the report was published, a gentle- 
man, who wished to remain anonymous, had inti- 
mated a gift of £10l, to be expended on such capi- 
tal works as might be selected. In answer to 
Sheriff Scott Moncrieff, Lord Salvesen said the 
money from the Carnegie Trustees had been given 
for the purposes of an aquarium only, and on the 
footing that no part of the revenue was to be 
devoted to any other purpose except the extension 
of the aquarium. The report was adopted. On 
the motion of Professor Cossar Ewart, the retiring 
members of Council were re-elected, and Professor 
Hudson Beare was elected to the Council, in room 
of the laic Mr. F. T. Cooper, K.C. 



WAR EFFECTS ON SCOTTISH 
ZOOLOGICAL PARK. 

By way of economising in paper the annual re- 
port of the Zoological Society of Scotland is issued 
(his year in reduced size, photographs and the 
customary list of Fellows having- been omitted. 

Despite unsatisfactory summer weather last 
year, and increased war prices for food-stuffs and 
labour, the revenue accounts show a small surplus. 
There is abundant evidence that the popularity of 
the Park has continued unabated. 



One adverse effect of the war is that 
the scarcity of transport, n number of 



vmg to 
mimals 



which have been gifted to the Society cannot be 
conveyed to this country. These include the pair 
of Bengal tigers presented by Lord Carmichael, 
Governor of Bengal. Owing to the high costs of 
food-stuffs, a number of hay-eating animals were 
sold or sent elsewhere. The high price of fish for 
feeding the seals, etc., has also been a serious 
matter. 

The total number of visitors at the Park dur- 
ing the year was 246,782, compared with 2170,328 
the previous year. A record day attendance was 
made on the September holiday, when the total 
was 12,083, whilst the best week was the Edin- 
burgh Trades Holiday week in July with 23,652. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

That the war in German East Africa has made 
our troops acquainted with strange foes. There 
have been several casualties through the attacks 
of crocodiles, and pickets have reported the 
presence of lions prowling about. It is nothing- 
unusual to meet a herd of Giraffes or for a Rhin- 
oceros to charge through the ranks. 



That the chief attraction at the Red Cross Fair 
held at the Caledonian Market was the covered 
portion where Lady Paget's animals sold briskly 
and well. 

Mr. Raymond Hitchcock, of "Mr. Man- 
hattan" fame, gave £50' for a Baboon, and some 
love-birds realised £5 each. A kitten, sold by 
Lad}- Diana Manners, went for £20; parrots 
fetched £5 and £10 each, pet lambs were also 
disposed of for £10, and some choice Pomeran- 
ians found purchasers at £20 and £25. 



That the following letter has been received from 
Lady Paget : — 

"35, Belgravc Square, S.W. 

June 12th, 1916. 
Mr. J. D. Hamlyn. 

Thank you for your letter, saying you will 
take back the Baboon for £5 for which send 
your cheque in due course. 

I wish to express my extreme appreciation 
of all your invaluable help last week- at the 

J\<-d Cross Fair, Caledonian Market. 

I was more grateful for it than I know how 
to express; indeed, I do not know what I 
should have done without it. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



I feel sure you will be pleased to hear how- 
successful I was. 

I think I shall have over £1,000. 

With repeated thanks. 

Yours truly, 

(Signed) M. PAGET." 

] am indeed pleased that our joint efforts gave 
her Ladyship satisfaction, and I beg to assure 
Lady Paget that my own services and that of 
my staff shall be always placed at her disposal 
in connection with any future charitable meet- 
ing. 



That some dozen Indian Birds arrived from Cal- 
cutta consigned to Mr. Westley T. Page, of 
Mitcham. 



That there is a marvellous scarcity of Apes, Ba- 
boons, and the common monkeys. The African 
arrivals being 2 Chimpanzees- — private property 
— 1 small Mandrill, 5 Dog-faces, with 26 Grey 
Parrots, during the last five weeks. The arrivals 
of Indian small animals being practically nil. 



That certain large consignments are on the way 



That the Canadian Porcupines lately imported 
have given birth to several young ones — 1 at the 
Regents Park Zoological Gardens, and 3' at our 
Menagerie in St. George's Street. 



That the worthy Curator of the Reptile House, 
Regents Park,' Mr. E. G. Boulenger, has joined 
up, so we are informed, the Naval Air Service. 
We cordially wish him a pleasant time and a 
sale return to his numerous charges. 



That some American Horse-shoe Crabs arc arriv- 
ing. These are most interesting creatures, and 
are a great novelty for Aquariums and Zoologi- 
cal Gardens. 



That the Wireless Press correspondent of Berne 
says : — 



" Despatches from Berlin state that von Ba- 
tocki, the new "food dictator," is considering 
the desirability of slaughtering the meat-eat- 
ing animals of the Berlin Zoo. 

" For a long time the lions and kindred ani- 
mals have been living on inferior kinds of 
meat, to which they took unkindly. 

"Even these supplies are required for hu- 
man consumption. Experiments to ascertain 
whether they could live on other foods were 

not successful. 

"It appears certain they will either be sent 
to some neighbouring neutral country until 
the end of the war, or that they will be slaugh- 
tered. 

"Von Batocki is reported to have said that 
the Avhole zoo will have to be sacrificed within' 
the next month." 

In contradiction to the above, I quote a few 
lines from a letter just received from a Director 
of one of the Northern European Gardens : — 

"The two Sea Lions arrived safely. I have 
just returned from a trip to Germany in order 
to buy animals for our Gardens. The Ger- 
mans had plenty for sale, and I bought one 
splendid male Lion, a South African Gemsbok 
(Oryx gazella), a Sable Antelope (Hippotra- 
gus niger), a Blue Gnu (Connochoetes taurina), 
with some other fine animals. Visiting several 
Zoological Gardens, I found the animals well 
fed and in good condition, and almost as 
plentiful as before the war in spite of the 
great difficulties in getting proper food for 
them. At present we have no animals for 
sale." 

Our readers must now judge for themselves 
which is correct. Why these reports concerning 
the various Zoological Gardens on the Continent 
appear so often I cannot understand. 



That New York will help in re-stocking the Zoo- 
logical Gardens at Antwerp, according to a 
decision of the Board of Managers of the New 
York Zoological Society. 

The decision was made in response to an 
appeal from the Zoological Society of Antwerp, 
which stated that its gardens had been almost 
depleted since the German invasion. As soon 
as the Belgian organisation is prepared to take 
up the restocking of the Antwerp gardens a veri- 
table Noah's Ark will be sent across the ocean 
from New York. 

The New York Board has decided to send 
the numerous duplicates among the more than 
5,000' specimens in the Zoological Gardens and 
the Aquarium here. 



Printed by W. J. Hasted & Son. (T.U.), 306, Mile End Road, London, E. 






WILLSON'S LIVE STOCK PROVIDERS, Ltd., 

37, New Oxford Street, London, W.C. 

Telephone— Gerrard, 7708. Telegrams— Highbred Westcent, London. Bankers— London County & Westminster. 



LONDON'S CHIEF EMPORIUM FOR DOGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 




All our adult dogs are sold on 14 days' trial on condition that if not liked they will be 
exchanged for livestock to value from our stock within this period. 

All our Dogs are daily inspected by a Qualified Veterinary Surgeon. 



"VISIT IS BESPECTPTJLLY ZR/JEG^UMSSTIEID. 

E. W. LITTLE, Fzs., 

Practical Naturalist and Taxidermist 

SPECIALIST IN BIG GAME TROPHIES 
AND FISH MOUNTING.- 

Studios: 65, YORK STREET, BAKER STREET, W. 

PADD1NQTON 6903. LONDON. 

GREY SQUIRRELS for Sale. 

Direct from North America, per S.S. "Minnehaha" and S.S. " Mesaba." 

FEMALES. 25/6. MALES, 20/6. 

SAFE DELIVERY GUARANTEE 0. ONLY VERY FEW LEFT. 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 221. St. George's Street, 

LONDON, EAST. 



f= 



3^yC 



^ 



£ 



Hamlyns 
Menagerie 



Magazine. 



No. 3.- Vol. 2. 



JULY, 1916. 



Price One Shilling 



CONTENTS. 



NOTICE 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

INTRODUCTORY 

THE AMERICAN HUMANE ASSOCIATION 

ADVENTURES IN GERMAN EAST AFRICA 

THE PEDIGREE OF POULTRY 

PLAY HY-SPY WITH THE BABY KANGAROO 

BIG GAME IN THE GOLD COAST ... 

BIRDS IN THE TRENCHES ... 

WONDERS OF THE GREAT DEEP ... 

ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND 

SOME DESIRABLE ALIENS .. 

STEPNEY TRIBUNAL AND ALIENS ... 

GENERAL NOTES 



17 
17 
17 
17 
17 
19 
20 
21 
21 
21 
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22 
23 
23 






& 



& 



Telegrams : Hamlyn, London Docks, London. 



Telephone : 6341 Avenue 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East. 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station 
Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence fiYe minutes walk. 
O.O. payable at Leman Street, East. Cheques crossed "London County &> Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TERMS— NOTICE.— All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from time of leaving my establishment 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back. TELEPHONE.— Orders can be received on telephone 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS.— Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication, DELIVERY.— Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING.— I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same r ' 



Pheai 
Babo* 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

For the arrivals from abroad during the past month. Full Particulars are given in 



General Notes.' 



Wanted to Purchase.— Swans, Geese, Rare 
Pheasants, Antelopes, Antelopes, Indian Cattle, Kangaroos, 
Baboons, Monkeys, every description of Animals and Birds for 
prompt. Cash. Do not dispose of any duplicates whatever to any 
Zoological or Public Gardens, Amateur or others, until you have 
my refusal. 



To arrive from Calcutta.— Rhesus Monkeys, Leopards, 
Hyasnas, Antelopes, Indian Bears, 50 Snakes, 100 rare Indian 
Honeysuckers, Mynahs, Bulluls, Cisoas, Orioles, Barbets. 
Particulars on Application. 

To arrive from New York. 

American Grey Squirrels, with 
Application. 



-Horse Shoe Crabs, Young 
i few Parrots. Prices on 



each £5 



2 African Fennecs (Canis pallidus) 

(first to arrive for years.) 
1 Puma, female, 3 years old, large variety ... ,, £30 

(Felis Concolor) 
Blue and White Foxes, 5 Blue, 2 Whites, all in first-class 

condition each £10 

4 Canadian Tree Porcupines, very hardy ... ,, 70/6 

Mother and young one for £6. 

Chimpanzees : — 

Constantly arriving, ranging from £50 to £150 each. 

2 Hocheur Monkeys, very fine and tame each £4 

(Cercopithecus nictitans) 

1 Chacma Baboon, tame. (Cynocephalus porcarius) ,, £12 

1 Anubis, (Cynocephalus anubis) ,, £10 

4 Guinea ( ,, sphinx) ,, £6 

4 Rhesus (Macasus rhesus) ,, £2 

2 Macaques ( ,, cynomolgus „ £2 

2 Bonnets ( ,, sinicus) ,, £2 

1 Red Deer Stag, 2 years old ,, 80/6 

12 Fox Cubs £1 

1 Pine Martens (Mustela martes) ,, £3 

12 North American Grey Squirrels (Sciurus cinereus. 

Females 25/6. Males 20/6. 
Grey Squirrels thrive in all our London Parks, and the various 
Zoological Gardens. They can be sent safely packed, and deliv- 
ery guaranteed. Early application requested. 

5 Canadian Black White Skunks (Mephitis 

mephitica) ... ... ... ... each 80/6 

These take the place of the Indian Mongoose for rats and 
all vermin. They are entirely devoid of any objectionable 
smell, the scent bacs being abstracted. The only Skunks at 
present for sale in Great Britain. 

2 Mandrills, tame pets each £7 

1 Bonnet, very small pet (smallest ever imported) £2 

1 Cape Ant — bear — fine specimen (Orycteropus 

capensis) first for years „ £50 



1 White tailed Gnu, imported (Connochoetes gnu) 
44 Golden-naped Amazons 

(Chrysotis auripalliata) beautiful young birds, 
first arrival here for years. 

14 Levaillants (Chrysotis levaillanti) 

These are in magnificent condition, all living 
outdoors. 

2 Green-cheeked (Chrysotis viridigena) 

In wonderful color. 

1 Yellow-billed (Chrysotis panamensis) 

2 Black-throated Troupials, rare small variety ... 

1 Orange Bishop, shewing good color 

1 Cat bird, seldom imported 

1 Scaly crowned Finch 

2 Severe Macaws, very fine, tame 

1 Red Buff „ „ „ 

5 Pairs Brazilian Rufous Pigeons, rare 

3 Little Bitterns, very rare, Brazil... 

1 Moorhen, ,, ,, ,, 

Cuba Finches each 16/6 

Olive ,, „ 16/6 

3 Mexican Starlings 

3 Saffron Finches ... ... 

Talking Grey Parrots 

Ordinary Grey Parrots 

Budgerigars, hens 6/-, cocks 4/- 

,, Yellow hens 7/6, cocks 5/- 

(2,000 Budgerigars sold in one month.) 

6 Canadian Geese 

15 Pairs, Carolina Ducks (last for this season) ... 

2 Guinea Fowls 

1 Emu, adult, fine bird 

4 African Weavers, very large variety 
10 Peachfaced Lovebirds 

3 Redfaced Lovebirds ... ... 

9 Cape Canaries 

1 Cape Blackhead 



each 
each 



£60 
2£ 



£2 



£2 

£2 

£1 

,, 2.-/6 

16,6 

,, 80/6 

80/6 

pair 40/6 

each 30/6 

20/6 

30/6 

30/6 

each 20/6 

7/6 

£7, £10. £15 each. 

£3, £4, £5 „ 

pair 



pair 



8/6 
10/6 



for 



Quantity of Senegal birds shorty expected, 
on application. 



£3 
£2 
10/6 
£12 
15/- 
30/6 
„ 25/6 
.. 10/6 
„ 12/6 
Particulars 



pair 
for 



each 
each 



Note revised prices 

The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at The Zoologi- 
cal Society's Gardens, Regents Park, London : — 

1 Alligator, 6 feet each £8 

1 ,, 5Jfeet £6 

1 King Snake ,, £2 

3 Giant Toads (Bufo marinus) ,, 15/6 

5 Small ,, „ 20/6 

2 Adorned Terrapins ,, 30/6 

1 Gopher Tortoise ,, 40/6 

1 Heloderm Lizard, poisonous ,, 60/6 

American Rattlesnakes, arriving unmutilated and of 

a good size. Prices on application. 

American Horse Shoe Crabs ,, 60/6 



■ 



Hamlgns Jttntojjme JHagajta. 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 3.— Vol. 2. 



LONDON, JULY, 1916. 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 



NOTICE. 



The subscription for Vol. II., 19916—17, is 
now due, 10/-, post free. If your name is not in 
the list on back page, kindly post 10/- without 
any delay. All subscriptions commence with No. 
1 of Vol. 2. Yearly subscriptions only received. 
Specimen copies can be sent post free on receipt 
of twelve penny stamps. Subscribers not receiv- 
ing their Magazine should communicate at once 
with the Editor. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE. 

All Subscribers in Norway, Sweden, Den- 
mark, Spain, Portugal, Switzerland and Holland, 
who have not received their usual numbers, are 
requested to communicate at once with the Editor. 
They will in future receive the Magazine through 
the Office of Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son, Strand, 
W.C. 



By arrangement with Messrs. W. H> Smith 
& Son, 186, Strand, W.C, "Hamlyn's Menagerie 
Magazine" is on sale on the 16th of each month 
at the following Railway Stations : — 

Charing Cross (South Eastern and Chatham 
Railway). 

King's Cross (Great Northern Railway). 

Liverpool Street (Great Eastern Railway). 

St. Pancras (Midland Railway). 

Victoria (South Eastern and Chatham Rail- 
way). 

Waterloo (South Western Railway). 



INTRODUCTORY. 



Notwithstanding the War, the increased cost 
of paper, the shortage of labour, and a multitude 
of other troubles, "Hamlyn's Menagerie Maga- 
zine" still continues to exist and flourish. There 
is no intention of curtailing the size of the Maga- 



zine, in fact, I have serious intentions of enlarg- 
ing it shortly. The sales at Messrs. Smith and 
Son's bookstalls are encouraging. The quantity 
of interesting matter sent in from all parts of the 
world is astounding. Many subscribers are com- 
plaining that several articles promised at the 
commencement of the Magadine have not yet 
appeared. The two articles, "How I became a 
Naturalist," and "Why I went to the Clongo," 
are now in print. I trust the Magazine has given 
general satisfaction; if so, I ask you, kind reader,, 
to become a subscriber. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



THE AMERICAN 
HUMANE ASSOCIATION. 

A Federation of Societies and Individuals for the 

Prevention of Cruelty, especially Cruelty to 

Children and Animals. 



Organized 1877. 



Incorporated 1903. 



Dr. William O. Stillman, President, Albany, 
.Y., writes as follows: — 

" I am pleased to receive your note of 
May, 1916, enclosing a copy of 'Hamlyn's 
Menagerie Magazine. ' We shall be much in- 
terested in the article in regard to' plumage 
which w'ou have kindly marked, and I have 
enjoyed reading the article on the jackal as 
a household pet. I wonder whether there 
would be any difficulty in my subscribing for 
this Magazine. There seems to be consider- 
able curious information in it." 



Adventures in German East Africa. 

Fori Elizabeth, April 15. 
Remarkable "big game" and other experi- 
ences in German Eas1 Africa are described by a 
British soldier in a letter to his mother, who 
resides here. 



18 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



We had a little "day out" on , he writes. 

which, though we were unsuccessful in getting 
at our nimble friend the Askari, was highly en- 
tertaining, if rather strenuous. We were out 
for twenty hours., in which time we were only 
three hours off our saddles, the first thirteen being 
a straight trek. We got into some awfully in- 
teresting country, and struck a beautiful river 
bordered by tall trees and a thick undergrowth 
clothing the high banks. 

You cannot imagine what this meant to us, 
and how refreshing it was, not only to the body, 
but to the eye. We saw heaps of game. I got 
quite close to a giraffe which was coming straight 
towards us. I was simply spell-bound, and all 
thoughts of lurking Askaris were thrown to the 
winds. He looked like a huge ladder with legs, 
and came along quietly nibbling the tops of the 
trees; then he saw us, and turned just as quietly 
and ambled off. 

HUNTER'S PARADISE. 

On the journey home a great old rhino 
trotted across about 200 yards in front of the 
column, making, as it appeared to be, for one of 
our outriders, who, as you can imagine, wasn't 
too bucked about it ! However, he followed a 
good military maxim and "took cover," mean- 
while somebody in front (it may have been our 
colonel) let Mr. Rhino, have it with two shots, 
which sent him ambling off into the bush. 

The game here is simply amazing. The 
other day on patrol we saw eland, koodoo, haart- 
beeste, lynx, and wild ostrich, to say nothing of 
smaller buck. This, of course, is what is known 
as Huntsman's Paradise, and famous for lions. 
How I should love to spend a few weeks with two 
or three nice fellows and a good pony ! 

We are quite near Kilimanjaro, but have not 
seen it or some days on account of the cloudy 
weather. We saw it by moonlight the other 
night. It was most beautiful. 

We hear no war news, and every one is 
keenly anxious to get a paptr and find out what 
is and what isn't. I managed to find an old 
London daily newspaper of February, 191., and 
simply devoured it. 

As to our domgs, we've been pretty busy of 
late, and when we go- "out" it means hard trek- 
king. We got among the Askaris the other morn- 
ing on patrol. No. 1 and No. 2 troops were 
advance guard, and we'd just got through a dense 
thorn scrub into an open strip when we halted 
and dismounted. I was just lighting my pipe 
when ping, ping, came the bullets out of he bush 
about 250 yards to our front. 

EXCITING TIMES. 
Dave's horse amongst them and mine refused 
to lei me get near him, and fooled about with me 



right in the open (bullets all round, very nice!). 
I eventually got on, but found myself separated 
from my own troop, so gave a hand in taking 
back the horses to No. 1, who had got down to 
it properly and were returning the fire with in- 
terest. We got back to the main body. Luckily 
no one was hurt, thanks to their rotten shooting. 
One horse was hit and one man had his bayonet 
smashed in half by a bullet. 

T.B. had an exciting experience. His horse 
stampeded at the beginnings so he cut for the 
bush, where he struck two other fellows who had 
missed the troop, so T.B. got up behind one of 
them and off they set for the rendezvous with a 
good deal of difference of opinion as to the direc- 
tion. Ultimately they came out of the bush and 
found themselves behind a German outpost. 

They skedaddled back and set off in an oppo- 
site direction. Here they ran into a rhino, who 
followed them for about a mile. 

They were afraid to fire for fear of disclos- 
ing their position so naturally felt somewhat 
alarmed. They trekked and trekked as rapidly 
as they could, the poor horses being so fagged 
one man had to take turns at trotting. 

Then they were surrounded by wild dogs 
and had to fire two shots into them to scare them 
off. Eventually they found they had got beyond 
our camp some miles, and had to turn back, but 
as it was dark they were afraid to approach for 
fear of our picket firing on them, so they just 
flopped down under a tree, fagged out, with one 
man on the watch for lions. 

Luckily our column passed quite close to 
them, and we picked them up. Poor old Trevor 
was dead to the world, and, in fact, we yere all 
fearfully tired. 

KILIMANJARO. 

Yesterday I was picked to go out with eleven 
others. This was quite an honour, and as 
"Gilly" was the non-com., we rode together. 

This was quite enjoyable, especially as being 
such a small body we got to close quarters with 
heaps of big game. A herd of giraffe I shall never 
forget. We got within 150 yards of them; a 
great bull like some prehistoric animal, tiny little 
ones like pocket editions. 

Eland we saw in hundreds, and G. and I 
stalked and got within fifty yards of amagnifi- 
cent cow. She was simply paralysed with Fear 
and stood and stared at us for about a minute, 
then whizzed round and cleared a big bush in one 
bound. 

Gemsbok, Grant's gazelle (much like our 
springbok), ostrich, wild pig, and an old lady 
rhino with her child, grazing among a lot of 
zebra; and in the distance Kilimanjaro standing 
up in the shimmering heat waves covered with 
snow. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



19 



This is a veritable fairyland, but the romance 
is very quickly dispelled when one returns to our 
hot sandy camp filled with humanity of every 
race, colour, and religion, or suddenly run into a 
party of Askaris in the dense thorny bush. Of 
course, we were not alowed to fire at the game, 
but coming' back to camp — — shot a young rooi- 
bok, which succulent morsel will tone up our 
evening meal considerably. 

One has to be awfully careful with the water 
bottle on the veldt, as you never know what's 
going to happen, so I never drink unless I am 
really thirsty, and always wait until I've cooled 
down as one drinks less then; this, I may tell 
you, requires a good deal of strength of will 
sometimes. I find an excellent substitute for 
wa:er in those thirst quenchers you sent me, 
which, by the way, are nearly finished, and those 
mal: lozenges which on trek are the best things 
in the world. I would be awfully thankful if you 
can get some more up to me. 



THE PEDIGREE OF POULTRY. 

By Frank Finn. 

The original wild fowl is what sportsmen call 
in India the Red Jungle-fowl; this inhabits North- 
ern India, Burma, Malaysia, and the adjacent 
Easgt Indian islands. It is only found in hot cli- 
mates, for though it loves the foot-hills, it seldom 
goes high enough up the mountains to get into a 
temperate climate, and it frequents tree and bam- 
boo jungle, coming out into the open at times to 
feed, and roosting on trees, to which it alsqi often 
takes when alarmed. Its habits are,, in fact, very 
similar to those of the pheasant here, and like 
that bird and its own tame descendants, it will 
feed on practically any kind of food, from grain 
to young snakes, even poisonous ones. In size 
and carriage it is also much like the pheasant, 
the cock being from 1£ to 2£ lbs. in weight, and 
the hen from barely more than 1 lb. to 1£; in 
colour it is just like some tame breeds, such as 
Brown Leghorns and Black-red Game. The legs, 
however, are slate-coloured, a tint which is nol 
accepted in any tame bird having the plumage of 
jungle-fowl. 

The hen lays only once a year, and her clutch 
varies from six to twelve in number, the smaller 
clutch being the more common; the eggs are 
Cream-coloured and, of course, small in size, like 
a pheasants. The chicks are brown, striped with 
chocolate and cream-colour, like black-red game 
chicks, and the hen is a most brave and devoted 
mother to them. Jungle-fowl can be tamed, es- 
pecially .he Burmese race, which is a little more 
like a tame fowl than the Indian, not having such 
a scared, wild look, so that it is possible that it 
was East of India that the taming of fowls began. 
They are commonly shot in India, and are fine 



eating if killed when in season, especially if they 
have had a chance to get at grain. Their notes 
are just like those of our bantams. 

There are three other kinds of wild fowls, 
one in South India, the Grey or Sonnerat's; 
another red kin din Ceylon; and the Green Jungle- 
cock of Java and the adjacent islands. These are 
quite distinct birds, and have never betn fully 
tamed, though they are obviously fowls, resem- 
bling the red Indian bird and its tame descendants 
such as zebras and donkeys resemble horses and 
ponies; in all the notes are unlike those of tame 
fowls. 

Wherever it was first tamed, the fowl was 
passed on by the Persians to' the Greeks; it was 
well known, to the Romans, who had bantams and 
a five-toed breed; and they found our ancestors 
keeping it when Caesar invaded Britain, though 
the ancient Britons did not eat their fowls, he 
says, but kept them for pleasure only. 

Now-a-days this bird Lsi kept nearly all over 
the world, even in Iceland and in the missionary 
settlements in Greenland; in the Pacific Islands 
it has run wild and no doubt elsewhere, but never 
except in a hot climate. Jungle-fowl, however, 
will live wild in our woods like pheasants, but 
would not probably survive long without artificial 
feeding in winter. 

We see then, how we are fighting against 
Nature in endeavouring to> get our hens to lay 
hundreds of eggs yearly; in raising fowls of six 
to ten pounds' weight; and in getting them to 
lay in winter. We also understand how it is that 
when two very distinct breeds are crossed, red 
and brown colurs often crop up; it is a reversion 
or throw-back to the original type. Similarly, 
when two non-sitting breeds are crossed, the 
cross-bred hems are as ready to sit as the ordinary 
breeds, going back to the instinct of the wild 
hen. 

The wild fowl is often found in pairs, only, 
and very rarely in large flocks, though a flock of 
thirty, cocks and hens mixed, has at least once 
been seen. This helps us to understand how it is 
much easier to keep a small group of fowls in 
good and productive condition than a large one; 
and it is quite against the nature of the bird to 
l'\c in packed colonies. The love of warmth and 
at the same time dislike of scorching sun, also 
take us back to the forest haunts, hot yet shady, 
of the original bird. 

The lirsi descendants of the jungle-fowl are 
common or barn door fowls, which have no special 
points, but very much in colour; these are still 
the common poultry of many countries, but in 
England have been so much crossed of late years 
with special breeds that they mostly show traces 
of seme breed or another ■ f the cultivated breeds, 
the fighting or Old English game is far the most 
like the wild bird, courage having been attended 
to without selection for other points. 



CO 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Of the specialised breeds, we have to distin- 
guish between the laying breeds, which are light- 
built birds as a rule, and do not sit; all of these 
lay white eggs; the general-purpose breeds, which 
are large and heavy, sit freely, and lay brown 
eggs; and the table breeds, which are heavy as a 
rule, and sit freely, but do not lay very well. Only 
the first two sections are of much interest from 
the point of view of the home poultry-keeper who 
keeps fowls chiefly for his own uset, and the 
layers more than any, since eggs are almost a 
necessity, while poultry still rank as a luxury on 
the tables of the great majority of our people. 

The layers and table fowls are mostly old 
breeds whose origin is unknown, except, of 
course, their common descent from the wild 
through the barn door birds; the general-purpose 
fowls are usually modern, having been built up 
by crossing various old breeds during the last 
half century, and it will be noticed that they are 
very much alike, much more so than the laying 
and table breeds. In fact, it has been said that 
passable specimens and as many as three of these 
breeds have been raised from one sitting of eggs 
of the same parentage. 

Such general-purpose breeds are the Orping- 
ton, Yyandotte, Plymouth Rock, and Rhode 
Island Red, all of which have a general resem- 
blance to the early Cochins which were intro- 
duced here ralf a century ago, and were at that 
day excellent general-purpose fowls, but Cochins 
have long ago been spoilt by breeding for leg- 
feathers and general fluff. 

The great layers at the present day are Leg- 
horns, and one hears very little about other 
breeds in this special capacity now-a-days, 
though there are other good laying breeds still, 
and some of the general-purpose birds are first- 
rate layers; laying being a matter which runs in 
"strains," that is to say, families which have been 
specially bred for it, and sguch strains occur in 
many breeds; whereas even a laying breed, if 
bred for show points only, will lose its laving 
powers, as has happened with Spanish and Ham- 
burghs. 



Play Hy-Spy with the Baby Kangaroo. 

By Felix J. Koch, Cincinnati, U.S.A. 

Now you see him, and now you don't! 

You'll call to your friends, just across the 
shaded avenue, to hurry over and catch a snap- 
shot of the cunning baby kangaroo and, almost 
so soon as your back was turned, he's vanished; 
ad when they come up and see neither hair nor 
hide ol him, they tell you you were dreaming and 
laugh vou to scorn. 



Of course, you know you saw a kangaroo 
baby; but, stay around with the scoffers as long 
as you please, Friend Baby will not put in appear- 
ance until you've all of you gone. 

What has become of him ? 

Well, that is one of the secrets you must 
worm from Supt. Sol. Stephen, of the big Cin- 
cinnati Zoological Gardens, where the kangaroo 
baby in the picture was born. 

You see, down in Australia, which is the 
kangaroo's native habitat, the kangaroos must 
often flee their foes mighty quick; quicker, far, 
than the little baby could run, at this age. So 
Nature, who does seem to look after the remotest 
detail, has fitted Mother Kongaroo with a snug 
little pouch, — the opening to which you'll remark 
as she confronts you, — and, into this, baby hops, 
on first suspicion of a danger, and there he re- 
mains until, in some mysterious manner, Mother 
tells the baby that all danger is gone. In fact, 
even when he's become quite a boy and is too 
big to return to the pouch, he will run to her and 
do his best to get in — as he no longer can. 

Little wonder, then, that the baby kangaroo 
and his mother always attract the attention of 
visitors to the Cincinnati grounds. But, even 
aside from the presence of the baby, which is al- 
ways a drawing-card with the animal-lovers, the 
kangaroo is one of the most interesting animals 
on the grounds. 

The kangaroos rank among the largest and 
most remarkable of the indigenous animals of 
Australia. The species are numerous, ranging 
from the size of a sheep to that of a rabbit, and 
are all distinguished by the curious structure of 
their hind feet. These are exceedingly long and 
powerful, and the feet, which are much elongated, 
rest with the whole sole upon the ground. The 
fore-legs are very short and are of little use to the 
animal in progression; its movements consisting 
of powerful leaps affected by the extension of the 
hind-legs. 

In its natural position, the kangaroo sits up- 
right upon its haunches, with the assistance of 
its powerful tail, which, with the two hind-legs, 
of feet forms a kind of tripod. 

In feeding, the kangaroos rest upon the fore- 
feet, and when thus engaged, the voung, which 
frequently retreat to the abdominal pouches, as 
already said, long after they are able to graze 
like their parents, may often be seen protruding 
their heads and cropping the herbage, at the 
same time with the mother. 

Baby Kangaroo, when first born, are little 
over an inch long and appear most like some semi- 
transparent mouse. They are lifted by the mouth 
of the mother into the pouch, where they feed 
from her for the time, remaining, in fact, in this 
natural hiding-place until able to go forth and 
graze for themselves. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



21 



Hamlin's Jlfanajjm* jKaga^itu. 



Published on the 15th of each month. 



Editorial and Business Office (pro tem) : — 

221, ST. GEORGE'S STREET, LONDON, E. 
Telephone: Avenue 6341. 
Telegrams: " Hamlyn, London Docks, London." 

Advertisement Rates, very reasonable, on application. 

The Editor will be glad to receive for publication articles 
and all interesting photos, the imports and exports of all 
stock, and foreign adventures with all wild stock. 



BIG GAME IN THE GOLD COAST. 

Lecturing before the Royal Geographical 
Society on Monday, Mr. A. E. Kitson, Director 
of the Gold Coast Geological Survey, said that 
lions are to be found in parts of the Northern Ter- 
ritories and Northern Ashanti, where they may 
often be heard roaring at night along the main 
routes. Leopards are common in the thick for- 
ests and the open forest country where caves 
afford shelter. The elephant frequents many parts 
of the Northern Territories and some parts of 
Ashanti and the Gold Coast Colony. The hippo- 
potamus is not uncommon in the deep pools of all 
the larger rivers in the Territories and the dry 
zone portions of the colony and Ashanti, and is 
also said to exist in the thick forest in the west 
of the colony. The warthog and wild pig are 
common in the dry country north of Ashanti. Of 
the antelopes there are several species more or 
less plentiful. The hartebeest, roan, reed-buck, 
water-buck, cob, oribi, and duiker roam over the 
lightly-timbered country, especially in the Terri- 
tories and Northern Ashanti. The duiker is com- 
mon in the thicker forests, where also the bush- 
buck is found. Buffaloes are numerous in many 
parts of the country where high grass affords 
cover. The native hunters frequently shoot them, 
but they are not often seen when one is hunting 
big game. During the dry season, when water 
is very scarce except in the large streams, ante- 
lopes especially do not wander far from the 
streams. Good shooting can then be had by 
those who do not object to heavy walking through 
long grass, half burnt and trailing. 



BIRDS IN THE TRENCHES. 

The following interesting letter appeared in 
"The Times" lately :■ — 

"Sir, — In your last issue you ask for infor- 
mation on birds around the war area. I have been 
in the trenches barely three months, but quite 
long enough to convince me that birds care little 
or nothing for (he noise of war, although, of 
course, it must interfere with them to a certain 
degree. I happen to be in a very pretty part of 



the country which favours observation; neverthe- 
less it is a very active part of the line. Often 
when doing my tour of duty in the trenches at 
night I have heard the nightingale near by, and 
the cuckoo by day, while in "no man's land" the 
kestrel habitually hovers, and we are reminded 
that dawn is approaching by a lark which soars 
to the heavens and pours forth his song. Even a 
oloud clearing the moon has made him do this- 
In the trenches we also hear owls and the whistle 
of birds on migration overhead. In a small thin 
copse running from our front line into "no man's 
land" magpies may be seen busy at their nests, 
and this same copse is a favourite shelling ground 
of the enemy. As I sit now in the dug-out linnets 
are perched on the ground singing- outside the 
door. My first swallow of the year was seen 
shimmering in "no man's land" amidst flying 
lead. Four or five common partridges were shot 
from the trenches with a rifle, and, being neatly 
shot, went to swell our daily menu. 

"All this occurs amongst shells, trench mor- 
tars, grenades, rifle fire, and all the other horrors 
or war. Their extraordinary disregard of all 
these seems astounding. But enoug-h has been 
said to show that the birds "carry on" with "busi- 
ness as usual," and that is what I believe you 
wished to know. 

"As regards the effect of gas upon them I 
have no experience, but even a bird could not 
withstand that foul atmosphere, and no doubt, 
like the rats in the trenches, succumb rx> it in 
thousands, as the gas carries for miles. 

"Not only birds but insects too the trenches 
hold; butterflies and moths of various species, 
and often the eye is gladdened by the pretty vision 
of a scarce or common "swallow-tail" poised on 
the front line parapet, lightening- the subaltern's 
dreary round or tour on duty. 

Erxest E. Johxsox. 

2nd Batt., The Queen's R.W.S. Regiment." 



WONDERS OF THE GREAT DEEP. 

It is well known that at certain depths of the 
sea tota darkness prevails, hence fishes thai in- 
habit these depths have by nature been provided 
for making their own light. Great devilfish, cut- 
tlefish, and octpuses, as well as shrimp and 
prawns, flicker through the water like will-o'-the 
wisps, and the most extraordinary of all of these 
illuminated fishes perhaps is the Eunoplotheutis 
diadema, discovered bv the naturalist Chun at a 
depth of about 5,000 feet, and photographed by 
its own light. The body of this fish is adorned 
with diadems resembling many-coloured jewels 
of the first water. The lights on its sides arc' iri- 
descent as pearls, others shine with pure ultra- 
marine blue, and still others glow like rubies. A 



22 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



cousin to this beautiful deep-water denizen is the 
Histioteuthys Rueppelli. The body of this fish 
is about three feet long, and its eight tentacles 
are joined at their base by a bright red membrane. 
It inhabits waters less than a thousand feet deep, 
and specimens have been found in the Mediter- 
ranean near Nice. Its, body is studded all over 
with tiny lights, varying from dazzling sapphire 
blue to sparkling topaz yellow. 

Another interesting species is. the Inops Mur- 
ray!, which has no eyes, but has two windows on 
the top of its head; these are lighted from below 
by a very complex arrangement of lamps. In its 
case, the lights are undoubtedly to attract, dazzle 
and entrap its prey, for, as it cannot see, they can 
be of no active help to it in searching out its 
food. In some fishes reflectors are situated behind 
the source of their lights, and almost always! there 
is a powerful lens in front of it. Some have shut- 
ters like those of a camera, and! some of these 
shutters have coloured slides by means of which 
these wonderful fishes can change the hue of their 
lights. Even the deep sea fishes " are wonderfully 
and fearfully made." 



ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY 
OF IRELAND. 

At the meeting of the Royal Zoological 
Society on Saturday, it was reported that visitors 
to the gardens during the week numbered 4,394. 
The Secretary announced that the collection had 
been increased by a gift of a cobra from Ceylon, 
sent by Mr. Edward B. Creasy, junior, of Colom- 
bo. Captain Henderson, of the 17th Lancers, 
sent a Titi monkey, a rare specimen seldom seen 
except in museum collections. There has also 
been given to the gardens on deposit a woolly 
monkey of the nigger tribe. Two Kestrels and a 
hooded crow are among other gifts. All the 
donors were thanked. 



SOME DESIRABLE ALIENS. 



"British Birds." Written and Illustrated by A. 
Thorburn, F.Z.S. With Eighty Plates in col- 
our, showing over four hundred species. To be 
completed in four volumes. Vol. III. Long- 
mans, Green and Co. £1 lis. 6d. net. 



The third volume of Mr. Thorburn's magnifi- 
cent illustrated catalogue of the feathered popu- 
lation of Great Britain presents a number of 
desirable aliens, some of whom might become 
naturalised but for the reclaiming- of waste lands 



in the past — a process likely to be vigorously 
renewed in the future — and the hateful habit of 
shooting unfamiliar birds at sight. The 

gentle sportsman is content with an actual 
or even a mental photograph of the rare visitant, 
but his game-keeper so scrupulous, and the cad 
with a gun — such as the fellow pilloried by Mr. 
Punch, who shot sea-gulls for "the fun of bring- 
ing 'em down" — of, of course, beyond argument 
or appeal. There is no hope of seeing die Flamin- 
go settled in this country in any case; he is the 
rarest of visitors (of fifteen appearances, only 
three were of really wild birds), and we cannot 
think of a British river where he would care to 
establish one of his cities of mud-built nests. 
Nor is it possible that such quaint American 
strays as the Buffel-headed Duck (known as the 
"Spirit Duck" in America owing to the surpris- 
ing rapidity with which he dives out of sight) or 
the Harlequin Duck (which is said to breed in 
Iceland) would ever become naturalised in these 
small and remote islands. How specimens ever 
reached our country is a question easily asked, 
not easily answered. But it is quite possible, if 
the destruction of rare birds and also the rifling 
of their nests could be entirely stopped by the force 
of public opinion, that the melancholy "squak" 
of the Night-Heron might become an occasion 
note in the symphony of nocturnal sounds. This 
curious, contempative bird has been known as a 
straggler in England since 1782; and it is probably 
far more frequent than the records would have us 
believe, for its habits are entirely nocturnal, and 
it secretes itself all day long in willow clumps and 
such like shady coverts, sitting quietlv on a 
bough till the sun goes down. Anyhow, the 
Common Bittern (called by the Onomatopoeic 
name in Holland) might once more become a resi r 
dent if it nest were spared. It was common 
enough in East Anglia until the end of the first 
quarter of last century, but its complete disap- 
pearance as a breeding species followed the exten- 
sive draining of the marshes where it nested. It 
is known to' have reared its young in Norfolk as 
late as 1911 (in at least one instance), and suffi- 
cient protection from the egg-collector would 
probably enable this strange fowl, with its deep 
and resonant booming note, to become once more 
a British citizen. Ducks are a feature of this 
penultimate volume, which also includes swans, 
geese, doves, and the various game-birds. Mr. 
Thorburn's little biographies are admirable as 
usual; they often contain the results of personal 
observation, as when he tells us that the Wood- 
Pigeon's ordinary reduplicated plaint (apt to be- 
come irritating when reiterated hour after hour) 
is not really amorous, as all poets have said and 
sung. The true love-song of the male is much 
softer in tone and more subtly blended, and the 
accompanying "display" consists of the adoption 
of a crouching attitude, while the pupils of the 
eyes are contracted until they are mere specks. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



23 



The pictures of the various birds are in all cases 
delightful; whenever Mr, Thorburn has been able 
to observe them in a state of freedom he gives us 
a veritable personality-sketch. What scope there 
is, inoonclusion, for a more careful observation 
of the daily doings of British birds, especially the 
waterfowl ! Even in the London suburbs this 
alluring work may be carried out in leisure hours, 
and those who take part in it will have a share in 
the fame of the Fabres of Natural History, and 
also fill the great gallery of remembrance with 
many a fair living picture, a solace to the mind's 
■eye in the difficult days that have begun for us all. 



STEPNEY TRIBUNAL & ALIENS. 



THE PROPOSED FOREIGN LEGION. 

The Mayor of Stepney ((Alderman J. D. 
KUe}', J. P.) presided at the meeting of the Step- 
ney Military Tribunal on Monday, when Coun- 
cillor J.. D. Hamlyn moved the following resolu- 
tion : — "That, in the opinion of this Tribunal, if 
the Government is not prepared to say that aliens 
domiciled in this country for years, who have 
shared its privileges and liberties in days of 
prosperity, should equally with its own citizens 
be called upon to defend it in its hour of danger, 
it should at least give those of them who desire, of 
their own free will to serve it, an opportunity of 
doing SO' by the formation of a foreign legion or 
some properly safe-guarded permission to enlist 
in certain British Regiments." Mr. Hamlyn sug- 
gested that this resolution would not have been 
needed if, as had been suggested, aliens were de- 
sirous of defending the country which gave them 
refuge and .liberty. The contention of Mr. Raphael, 
as given in his speech at Hackney, that aliens 
were eager to come forward to help England, was 
not borne out at that Tribunal. 

The Mayor approved of the resolution, but 
mentioned that when the suggestion of a foreign 
legion was first suggested to the Government, 
the War Office did not appear to appreciate it. 
Latterly, however, a change had taken place, and 
they now seemed willing to adopt the idea. 

When a seconder was asked for, all the mem- 
bers of the Tribunal rose to do so, and the reso- 
lution was carried unanimously. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

By John I). Hamlyn. 
That Mr. Wesley T. Page received another small 
consignment of birds from Calcutta last week. 
Fifty-four birds were shipped, thirty-four ar- 
rived alive. Rare Parrakeets died during the 



voyage. There were 12 Quail, 6 Rose Linnets, 
6 Goldfinches, 2: Pied Mynahs, 3' Zosterops, and 
some Parrakeets landed alive. 



That the "Walmer Castile" arrived with three 
White-tailed Gnus and 1 Baboon. 



That the Danish steamer arrived with one very 
fine Puma lion: also 1 Emu. 



That the following arrived on the various West 
African steamers : 2i Chimpanzees, 1 large Man- 
drill, 1 large Anubis, 10 ordinary Drills and 
Mandrills, 20 Anubis and Senegal Baboons, 30 
Vernet Patas, Callatrix and Mangabey Mon- 
keys, 1 African Python, 4 Marabon Storks, 20 
Grey Parrots. 



That I received for the first time for thirty years 
2 African Fennecs. These are very curious in- 
teresting- little animals. 



That the arrivals from the Continent have been : 
3 Lemurs, 3' Rhesus, 3 Jews, 6' Bonnets, 6 
Senegal Baboons, and about 300; pairs Shell 
Parrots. 



That the following have been born lately in the 
Zoological Gardens, Regents Park : — 1 Cana- 
dian Beaver, 1 male and 1 female Barbary 
Sheep. 1 Albino Reindeer Calf. Mr. Pccock 
in "The Field" states : — 

"The Society's success in keeping reindeer 
has again been crowned by the birth of a 
calf from one born in the Gardens three 
years ag'o. For many reasons it i's to be re- 
gretted that the calf is an albino, the coat 
being snow white, the skin pink, and the 
hoofs pale horn coloured insteadi of black. 
The eyes, however, are not pink but blue, like 
the eyes of some white cats and partially 
albino dogs and horses and blonde human 
beings. These zoological delects will, how- 
ever, add greatly to the popular attractive- 
ness of the animal." 
Also a litter of 5 Indian Wolves. 



That on behalf of the Minister for the Belgian 
Congo, the Zoological Gardens, Regents Park, 
is temporarily taking charge of a lioness from 
that district of Africa; her ultimate destination 
is the Zoological ardens at Antwerp, whither 
she will be sent when Belgium recovers her own 



24 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



again. Although only about three years old, 
so far as can be judged, she is a particularly 
nice-looking animal, and interesting for one or 
two reasons. In certain lights, faint rosette-like 
spots can be seen everywhere on the head and 
back and sides, but on the belly, legs both 
outside and inside, and on the posterior half 
of the tail, the pattern of chocolate brown spots 
is very distinct. 



That an interesting and valuable addition to the 
collection in the Zoological Park in Edinburgh, 
which has just been received, is a young jaguar, 
which has been sent by Mr. Douglas G. W. 
Aimers from Brazil. The jaguar is the largest 
of the cat family inhabiting the New World, 
and though in colour and markings it greatly 
resembles the Old World leopard, it exceeds 
the latter considerably in size. The jaguar is 
on view in the Acclimatisation House, where 
there are also specimens of the puma and the 
ocelot, the two other New World cats next ap- 
proaching it in size. 



That Longtown (Cumberland) Advisory Commit- 
tee have recommended for exemption Richard 
Bell, aged 18-, soo of William Bell, wild duck 
rearer for Sir Richard Graham, of Netherby, 
on the ground that the father's nine other sons 
voluntarily enlisted on the outbreak of the war. 
Truly a remarkable patriotic family. What an 
example to those living in the East End of 
London ! 



That Prince Lennart of Sweden has received a 
lion cub, brought home by his father, Prince 
Wilhelm, from his last big-game shooting ex- 
pedition. 



That the care expended on the well-being of the 
animals, in modern zoological gardens is well 
illustrated in the fourty-fourth annual report of 
the Zoological Society of Philadelphia, which 
we have just received. As in the Gardens of the 
Zoological Society of London, the most search- 
ing post-mortem examination is instituted in 
the case of every death, and as a result dis- 
coveries are made the importance of which is 
not to be measured by their immediate value 
to the society concerned. In the present report 
the most interesting items are a mysterious 
epizootic among the waterfowl, and of an arach- 
noid parasite in the lungs of monkeys. The 
lesions they produce simulate, and may be mis- 
taken for, tubercles. But their presence does 
not seem sriously to affect the host. The origi- 
nal habitat and mode of transmission are un- 
known, but no fewer than four different species 



have been described, and have been taken from 
monkeys both in India and Africa, as well as 
from captive specimens. 



That in the "Australian Zoologist" (vol. i., part 
3) Dr. A. S. Le Souef, the director of the Zoo- 
logical Gardens, Sydney, records some inter- 
esting colour variations of opossums of the 
genus Trichosurus. The general coloration of 
the common opossum (Trichosurus vulpecula) 
is grey above, white below. The variants on 
this are rufous, black, and fawn, but it seems 
difficult to associate such variations with en- 
vironmental conditions. Thus "brown" col- 
oured individuals are most common in Tas- 
mania, and appear to be confined to the moist, 
heavily timbered districts; but on the mainland 
brown-coloured specimens are very common, 
"particularly in the drier districts." The des- 
cendants of the Tasmanian opossum turned out 
at Lyttelton, New Zealand, some five and twenty 
years ago already show variation from the 
typical form, since the animals have become 
darker and the fur longer and less dense. The 
author suggests that Mr. Oldfield Thomas, of 
the British Museum, was in error when he des- 
cribed the mountain opossum (T. caninus) as 
brown in colour- This hue appears only in the 
black opossum after it has been partially depig- 
mented by immersion in spirits. The egistence 
of the black opossum is here recognised for the 
first time, being designated a distinct subspecies 
(T. caninus nigrans). Thi swell-marked sub- 
species "is found in the heavy costal scrubs in 
north-eastern New South Wales and southern 
Queensland." 



That great credit is due to Keeper Sherwin at 
the Small Bird House, Zoological Gardens, 
Regents Park, for his attention to the below- 
mentioned youngsters at present under his 
charge : — 

4 baby Rufous Tinamous (foster mother a 

white Orpington). 
12 young Partridges (foster mother a white 

Silky). 
2 Andean Goslings (foster mother a Light 
Sussex). 
one of the most interesting sights that I have 
ever seen at the Repents Park Zoo. 



That Captain Persy has arrived at Marseilles with 
a splendid collection of animals for tiie Jardin 
des Plantes, Paris. They came from Abys- 
sinia, and include amongst many specimens, 2 
Giraffes, 1 young Elephant, 2 Rhinocerus, 4 
Lions, Ostriches and Snakes. 



Printed by W. J. Hasted & Son, (T.U.), 306, Mile End Road, London, E. 



WILLSON'S LIVE STOCK PROVIDERS, Ltd., 

37, New Oxford Street, London, W.C. 

Telephone— Gerrard, 7708. Telegrams— Highbred Westcent, London. Bankers— London County & Westminster. 

LONDON'S CHIEF EMPORIUM FOR DOGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



All our adult dogs are sold on 14 days' trial on condition that if not liked they will be 
exchanged for livestock to value from our stock within this period. 

All our Dogs are daily inspected by a Qualified Veterinary Surgeon. 



.A. "VISIT IS -R^&JPBXDT^TJJLjJLjIZ: IR/JEG^CiEiSTEilD 

E. W. LITTLE, F.z.s., 

Practical Naturalist and Taxidermist. 

SPECIALIST IN BIG GAME TROPHIES 
—AND FISH MOUNTING. 

Studios: 65, YORK STREET, BAKER STREET, W. 

PADDINQTON 6903. LONDON. 

GREY SQUIRRELS for Sale 

Direct from North America, per S.S. "Minnehaha" and S.S. " Mesaba." 

FEMALES, 25/6. MALES, 20/6. 

SAFE DELIVERY GUARANTEED. ONLY VERY FEW LEFT. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN, 221, St. Georges Street, 

LONDON, EAST. 



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 



List of Subscribers, for Vol. II., 1916—17. 

The Earl of Lonsdale, Lowther, Penrith. 

The Lord Rothschild, Museum, Tring. 

The Countess of Jersey, Middleton Park, Bices- 
ter. 

The Lady Julia Follett, The Woodside, Old Wind- 
sor. 

The Hon. E. S. Montague, M.P., Bridge Street, 
Cambridge. 

Sir John Bland Sutton, 47, Brook Street, Gros- 
venor Square. 

Sir Edgar Boehm, Bentsbrooke, North Holm- 
wood, Surrey. 

Major Atherley, Croft Castle, Kingsland, Here- 
fordshire. 

The Clifton Zoological Gardens, Bristol. 

The Royal Zoological Gardens, Dublin. 

Messrs.. Jennison and Co. , Belle Vue, Manchester. 

The Director, Royal Zoological Society, Natura 
Artis Magistra, Amsterdam. 

The Superintendent, Zoological Gardens, Alipur, 
Calcutta, India. 

The Director, Zoological Gardens, Tokyo, Japan. 

Robt. D. Carson, Zoological Gardens, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., U.S.A. 

Dr. Penrose, Zoological Gardens, Philadelphia, 
Pa., U.S.A. 

E. A. Le Souef, Zoological Gardens, Perth, Aus- 

tralia. 

The Director, Zoological Gardens, Copenhagen. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Rotterdam. 
Dr. F. D. Baker, National Zoological Park, 
Washington, D.C. 

Richard Arnold, Tower House, Leigham Court 

Road, Streatham. 
Lieut. Thomas Buchan, Hepburn, Haddington, 

East Lothian. 
Dr. M. Bernstein, 51, Cazenove Road, Stoke New- 

ington. 

F. E. Blaauw, Gooliust, St. Graveland, Hilver- 

sum, Holland. 

Wm. Shore-Baily, Boyers House, Westbury, 
Wilts. 

Dr. John K. Butter, M.D., Highfidd House, Can- 
nock, Staffs. 

Mrs. Cotton, The Mount, Bishopstoke. 

W. Edmunds, Coombe Farm, Langton Matra- 
vers, Dorset. 

II. Earl, Newgale House, Cottingham, E. Yorks. 

Herbert A. French, St. Margaret's, Downs Park 
West, Bristol. 

Linwood Flint, Waterford, Maine, U.S.A. 

Miss Hall, 76, Adelaide Road, Hampstead, N.W. 

Miss Howman, 6, Essex Grove, Upper Norwood. 

Rev. Hemsworth, Monks Fryston, S, Milford. 



W. J. Henning, Hillside, New Maiden. 

T. Hebb, Brooklea, Downs Road, Luotn. 

W. A. Harding, Histon Manor, Cambridge. 

Homes Zoological Society, 318, Keith and Perry 
Buildings, Kansas City, U.S.A. 

Lieutenant T. Buchan-Hepburn, Letham, Had- 
dington, Scotland. 

H. Ide, Elm Lawn, Eden Street, Kingston-on- 
Thames. 

William Jamrach, 65, Lordship Lane, Stoke New- 
ington, N. 

Mrs. E. Jordan, Gorthie, Wokingham. 

Mrs. Johnstone, Burrswood, Groombridge, Kent. 

Alderman J. D. Kiley, J. P., 33, Gun Street, 
Spitalfields. 

C. F. Leach, Vale Lodge, Leatherhead. 

P. L. Morgan, Westfield, Elgin, Scotland. 

Dan Mason, Maisonette, Broadstairs. 

John W. Marsden, Thornhurst, Tewit Park, Har- 
rogate. 

R. Scott-Miller, Greenoakhill, Broomhouse, Scot- 
land. 

Mrs. C. Prioleau, Loxwood House, Billinghurst. 

L. Pullar, Dunbarnie Cottage, Bridge of Earn. 

Monsieur Pichot, Boulevard Haussman, Paris. 

A. Reeve, Hall-by-the-Sea, Margate. 

Ernest W. Robinson, Liscombe, Leighton Buz- 
zard. 

Gerald Rattigan, Frou Selen Hall, Caersws, Mont- 
gomeryshire. 

Warren Bruce Smith, Aubrey Lodge, Emsworth, 
Hants. 

G. de Southoff, Leysin, Vaud, Switzerland. 

Dr. W. O. Stillman, 287, State Street, Albany, 
N.Y., U.S.A. 

H. S. Spencer, 109, Barcombe Avenue, Streatham 
Hill. 

W. H. St. Quinton, Scampston Hall, Rillington, 
York. 

W. R. Temple, Ormonde, Datchet, Bucks. 

W. D. Trickett, Lench House, Waterfoot. 

W. Wightman, Estate Office, Avnhoe, Banbury. 

G. L. dc Waru, Les Lilas, Leysin, Vaud, Swit- 
zerland. 

Walter Winans, Claridge's Hotel, Brook Street, 
W. 

Captain Woodward, Mayville, Kingston-by-Sea. 
Brighton. 

E. Wuiron, 7, Rue Theophile Gautier, Neuill) 
pres Paris. 

Messrs. Willsons, 37, New Oxford Street, W. 

A. S. Yates, Bishops Sutton, Alresford, Hants. 

The Zoological Society oi Scotland, Corstorphinc, 
Murray field, Edinburgh. 



f= 



^ 



HAMLYN'r 



JIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK 



SEP -2 1916 



RECEIVED 



Menagerie 
Magazine 



\ No. 4. 

If 



Vol. 2. 



AUGUST, 1916. 



Price One Shilling 



CONTENTS. 



NOTICE 
IMPORTANT NOTICE 

BOSTOCK AND WO MBW ELL'S MENAGERIE, PLYMOUTH 

TRAGIC FIGHT WITH GIANT APES 

DEATH OF 'COCKY BENNETT," THE VETERAN AUSTRALIAN SULPHUR 

CRESTED COCKATOO ... 
A WHITE RAVEN 

BIRDS AND BEASTS IN THE WAR ZONE ... 
BELLE VUE GARDENS, MANCHESTER 

TIGERS 

ORANG-OUTANG v. MAN 
GENERAL NOTES 



25 
25 
25 
25 

26 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 






e= 



:Oc 



4 



Telegrams: Hamlyn, London Docks, London. 



Telephone : 6341 Avenue 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East. 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station 
Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence five minutes walk. 

P O.O. payable at Leman Street, East. Cheques crossed " London County &> Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TERMS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from time of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back. TELEPHONE. — Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS. — Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIVERY. — Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

For the arrivals from abroad during the past month. Full Particulars are given in " General Notes.' 



Wanted to Purchase. — Swans, Geese, Rare Pheasants, 
Antelopes, Indian Cattle, Kangaroos, Baboons, Monkeys, 
every description of Animals and Birds for prompt Cash, 
Do not dispose of any duplicates whatever to any Zoological 
or Public Gardens, Amateur or others, until you have 
my refusal. 

The first consignment of 200 Rhesus Monkeys arrived on the 
" Tactician," a very fair lot, all sold in one day. The second 
consignment will arrive on the " Historian." Monkeys, Leopards, 
Bear, Hyaenas, Snakes and Birds. 



1 Kola Camba, Chimpanzee ... ... ... for £150 

Male Mandrill, three parts grown, shewing color well ,, £100 

Male Chimpanzee, good size ... ... ... ,,' £100 

Female Chimpanzee, good size, been a pet for three 



£100 

„ £30 

each £2, £3 and £5 

for £3 

£35 

£25 

„ £25 

£20 

„ £16 
each £3 to £10 
each £3, £4 and £5 
Blue and White Foxes. 5 Blue, 2 Whites, all in first-class 

each £10 
70/6 



years 
Pair Senegal Baboons, very fine 
Rhesus Monkeys 
Pine Marten, Norwegian 
Polar Bear, Cub, fine specimen 
Indian Leopard ... 
1 Sloth Bear ... 
Indian Sloth Bear 
Indian Hyaena ... 
Indian Python Snakes ... 
Laponda Apes ... 



condition. 

4 Canadian Tree Porcupines, very hardy 

Mother and young one for £6. 
12 North American Grey Squirrels (Sciurus cinereus. 

Females 25/6. Males 20/6. 
Grey Squirrels thrive in all our London Parks, and the various 
Zoological Gardens. They can be sent safely packed, and deliv- 
ery guaranteed. Early application requested. 

5 Canadian Black White Skunks (Mephitis 

mephitica) ... ... ... ... each 80/6 

These take the place of the Indian Mongoose for rats and 
all vermin. They are entirely devoid of any objectionable 
smell, the scent bacs being abstracted. The only Skunks at 
present for sale in Great Britain. 

2 Golden-naped Amazons each £2 

(Chrysotis auripalliata) beautiful young birds, 
first arrival here for years. 

2 Levaillants (Chrysotis levaillanti) ,, £2 

These are in magnificent condition, all living 
outdoors. 



2 Green-cheeked (Chrysotis viridigena) 

In wonderful color. 
1 Yellow-billed (Chrysotis panamensis) 

1 Cat bird, seldom imported ... 

2 Severe Macaws, very fine, tame ... 
1 Red Buff ., 

5 Pairs Brazilian Rufous Pigeons, rare 
1 Little Bittern, very rare, Brazil ... 

Cuba Finches each 16/6 

Olive ,, ,, 16/6 

3 Mexican Starlings 

3 Saffron Finches 

Talking Grey Parrots 

Ordinary Grey Parrots 

White-headed Laughing Thrushes ... 

Yellow-fronted Fly Catcher 

Golden Oriole 

Barbet 

Himlayan Bulbul 

Blue-headed Chat 

Red-headed Lorry 

Grey Parrots 

Budgerigars, hens 6/-, cocks 4/- 

Yellow hens 7/6, cocks 5/- 
7 Canadian Geese 





,, 


25/6 


,, 


80/6 




80/6 


pair 


40/6 


for 


30/6 


pair 


30/6 


,, 


30/6 


each 


20/6 


£7, £10, £15 each. 


£3, £4, £5 




... each 


40/6 


,, 


40/6 






40/6 




, 


40/6 




, 


40/6 




, 


40/6 




' 


60/6 
80/6 



pair 8/6 
10/6 
for 70/6 < 



Penquins arriving from South African, only very few. 
Prices on application. 



American Horse-Shoe Crabs, arrived, 40/6 each. 
Extraordinary creatures for exhibition purposes. 



African and Indian Birds constantly arriving. 



each £8 



Note revised prices 

The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at The Zoologi 
cal Society's Gardens, Regents Park, London 

1 Alligator, 6 feet 

1 „ 5Jfeet 

1 King Snake £2 

3 Giant Toads (Bufo marinus) ,, 15/6 

5 Small ., „ 20/6 

2 Adorned Terrapins ,, 30/6 

1 Gopher Tortoise ,, 40/6 

1 Hcloderm Lizard, poisonous 



American Rattlesnakes, arriving unmutilated and of 
a good size. Prices on application. 



" 



Hamljns Jttmttjjerie JEagajmt 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 4.— Vol. 2. 



LONDON, AUGUST, 1916. 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 



Hamlim's fflLmagtvit JUaga^itu. 



Published on the 15th of each month 



Editorial and Business Office (pro tern) : — 

221, ST. GEORGE'S STREET, LONDON, 
Telephone: Avenue 6341. 
Telegrams : " Hamlyn, London Docks, London." 



Advertisement Rates, very reasonable, on application, 



The Editor wilt be glad to receive for publication articles 
and all interesting photos, the imports and exports of all 
stock, and foreign adventures with all wild stock. 



NOTICE. 

The subscription for Vol. II., 1916' — 17, is 
now due, 10'/-, post free. If your name is not in 
the list on back page, kindly post 10/- without 
any delay. All subscriptions commence with No. 
1 of Vol. 2. Yearly subscriptions only received. 
Specimen copies can be sent post free on receipt 
of twelve penny stamps. Subscribers not receiv- 
ing- their Magazine should communicate at once 
with the Editor. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE. 

All Subscribers in Norway, Sweden, Den- 
mark, Spain, Portugal, Switzerland and Holland, 
who have not received their usual numbers, are 
requested toi communicate at once with the Editor. 
They will in future receive the Magazine through 
the Office of Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son, Strand, 
W.C. 

By arrangement with Messrs. W. H. Smith 
& Son, 186, Strand, W.C, "Hamlyn's Menagerie 
Magazine" is on sale on the 16th of each month 
at the following Railway Stations : — 

Charing Cross (South Eastern and Chatham 
Railway). 

King's Cross (Great Northern Railway). 

Liverpool Street (Great Eastern Railway). 

St. Pancras (Midland Railway). 

Victoria (South Eastern and Chatham Rail- 
way). 

Waterloo (South Western Railway). 



PLYMOUTH TRIBUNAL. 



BOSTOCK AND WOMBWELL'S 

MENAGERIE, PLYMOUTH, 

Thursday, July 27th, 1916. 



Bostock and Womb well 'si Menagerie was the 
subject of an application by Mr. I. Foot, who 
gave an interesting description of the exhibition 
and its necessity as an educational institution. 
He claimed that it instructed the dising genera- 
tion in natural history, but as the show was at 
present at Winchester the risk of withdrawing 
five men for attendance at this Tribunal was con- 
siderable. One was in charge of a 2^ ton hippo- 
potamus, to whom he had evidently been a second 
father, whilst another was purveyor to the Garni 
vora, who might resent his absence since no one 
else could provide their menu, and it was not 
desired that they should appease their hunger 
with school children. There would be difficulty 
in closing down the show, and it was not desira 
ble toi kill off the animals. 

The Tribunal could not concede the points 
altogether that the show was necessary to national 
education or that it was advisable to travel up 
and down the country at the present time. Ex 
emption was, however, granted until December 
1st for all five men as* equally part and parcel of 
it. 



TRAGIC FIGHT WITH GIANT APES. 

A vivid story of an orang outang hunt in 
Borneo, in the course of which four men were 
killed, one crippled for life, and another seriously 
injured, is related in a Surabaya journal received 
in Amsterdam by the last mail from the Dutch 
Indies. 

Charles Mayer, an Austsralian dealer in wild 
animals, having recently arrived in Borneo on a 
collecting expedition for several European zoos, 
set out for the Landak River region with the 



26 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



object of capturing two crang-outangse which had 
for some time rendered the adjacent country un- 
safe for travellers. 

Mayer caused the native beaters he had en- 
gaged to fell all the trees within a radius of about 
a quarter of a mile of the tree in which the apes 
had their abode with the exception of those im- 
mediately surrounding it, which were only partly 
cut. 

Mayer then began cautiously to approach the 
apes' tree, and after sighting the animals, which 
were of immense size, he gave his men a pre- 
arranged signal', anl with a terrific crash the 
partly lopped trees fell to the ground. 

A fire of branches was then lit underneath 
the apes' tree, and when the smoke had driven 
the animals to seek refuge in the topmost limbs 
some of the natives began felling the tree, while 
others held in readiness two large nets in which 
to catch the apes. The tree swayed and fell, 
and, uttering savage cries, the two animals, their 
long arms tightly clasping one another's bodies, 
came to the ground, and the nets were thrown 
over them. 

The male orang, contriving to release one of 
his arms, clutched the Australian by the leg, and 
dragged him towards the net. Mayer defended 
himself with an axe, but his leg was; broken be- 
fore his men could come to his assistance, and 
divert the attack by belabouring' the ape with a 
qlub. The animal ( then released his hold of 
Mayer, and' seized one of the natives, who was 
killed before any one could come to his assist- 
ance. A second native also fell a victim to the 
fury of the animal, and while efforts were being 
made to release him the female orang released 
her arms from the net, and killed two men and 
crippled a third. 

Mayer was carried from the spot in a state 
of unconsciousness, and after having been at- 
tended by a native medicine man in a hut in the 
forest was conveyed to Rynbang, in Dutch North 
Borneo, where he still remains under the care of 
two doctors. 

Four days later his native servants arrived 
there, bringing with them the two captured orang- 
outangs, yhich have since been despatched to 
Singapore for shipment to Europe. 



Death of " Cocky Bennett," the Veteran 
Australian Sulphur-crested Cockatoo. 

Mr. J. Curragh, Killara, Sydney, sends us 
the following cutting., — 

" 'Cocky Bennett;,' a Sulphur-Crested 
Australian Cockatoo, died on Friday in his 
120th year at Canterbury. This age is a 



record in longevity for an Australian Parrot 
so far as the official records are concerned. 
For many years this bird was in the posses- 
sion of Mrs. Sarah Bennett, the licensee of 
the Sea Breeze Hotel, at Tom Ugly's Point. 
When she left there, about 12 months ago, 
she transferred the Parrot to her nephew, 
Mr,. Murdoch Alexander Wagschall, at Wool- 
pack Hotel, Conterbury. The old bird was 
absolutely featherless for the last 20 years, 
but it maintained its 'patter' till the day be- 
fore its death. 'Cocky Bennett' was a great 
traveller, and is said to have journeyed seven 
times round the world. Mr. Wagschall has 
arranged to have the remains of this historic 
Parrot preserved by a taxidermist." 
Mr. Curragh says "Cocky" was a well-known 
character at Tom Ugly's Point; he had a beak 
something like Harry Lauder's stick, quite as 
crooked. It had to have a piece broken off occa- 
sionally, or "Cocky" would have been in great 
difficulties. He had no plumage, but he was for 
years constantly threatening to fly. He used to 
flap his stumps of wings and veil, "I'll fly; I'll flv; 
by God! I'll fly!" 



-£'- 



A WHITE RAVEN. 

The following interesting particulars are given 
of a White Raven, also< of the supplies to the 
Central Markets in Paris of Game, etc., in "La 
Revue Avicole," Paris. 



UN CORBEAU BLANC. 
Pres du Chatelet, quai de la Megisserie, on 
peut voir chez un marchand^un qorbeau d'une 
couleur rare : son plumage est d'un blanc imma- 
cule. "C'est un corbeau francais," nous affirme 
la marchande. II a ete pris, void quelques mois, 
dans les plaines de Pile de France, et il habite 
dequis ce temps une grande cage, au-dessous d'un 
perroquet a l'ceil dedaigneux. Messire corbeau, 
dont "la fcnction est d'etre blanc," comme le 
Pierrot de Theodore de Banville, manifeste dans 
sa prison une impatience bien naturelle. 



HALLES CENTRALES DE PARIS. 

Statistique du trafic pendant le mois mai vente 
en gros de la volaille et du gibier. 

Arrivages (poids net) 

1916 1915 

kilos kilos 

Volaille 1.103.078 1.091.984 

Gibier 1.300 1.600 



Total 1.104.378 1.093.584 

Detail des arrivages en pieces 






HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



27 



VOLAILLES 



Canards 


.. 55.975 


60. 843 


Dindes 


1.286 


1.515 


Lapins 


.. 223>.477 


222,465 


Oies : 


12.112 


5.072 


Pigeons morts 


... 35.998 


41.242 


— vivants 


, , 


634 


Pintades 


1.134 


1.624; 


Poulets morts 


.. 268.834 


285.6 1 


— vivants 


17.191 


9.184 


Pieces diverses 


.. 109.538 


88.831 



Total 

GIBIER 

Alouet.es 

Becasses, becassines 
Canards sauv. , sarcelles 

Cailles 

Cerfs, biches, daims, chevr. 

Faisans 

Gibiers d'eau 

Grives et Merles 

Lapins de garenne 

Lievres francais 

Lievres etrangers 

Perdreaux francais 

Perdreaux etrangers 

Sangliers 

Pieces diverses 



725.545 717.082 



1.132 1.641 



Volaille 
Gibier 



Total 1.144 1.646 

Produits des ventes 

3.632351 70 2,954.028 70 

3.702 55 2.944 70 



Total 



3,. 636. 054 25 2.956,973 50 



Ch. S. 



BIRDS AND BEASTS IN THE 
WAR ZONE. 

The Petrograd Society of Naturalists has ap- 
pealed to all nature lovers and hunters to report 
to it any information they may have gathered as 
to the influence of military operations upon the 
life of birds and animals, and any deviations from 
the normal course of their periodical appearance 
Avhich may have been noted. 

There is no doubt that the war has had a 
greai. effect upon the life of the fauna in the zone 
of operations. So far the greatest attention has 
been allotted to the influence of the war upon 
birds. Thus, the French zoologist Carnolc points 
out that in places where fighting occurred the 
birds became greatly distrubed, screeching and 
flying about in all directions, unable to settle down 
anywhere, day and nigh!:. Among the migratory 
birds, those which dwell south of the war zone 



carried out their flght to the warm lands in the 
Customary direction, but beglan it somewhat 
earlier (than under normal conditions — as, for ex- 
ample, storks. As regards migratory birds dwell- 
ing north of the war zone, they skirted the line 
of the front and, instead of flying through France, 
flew through Switzerland and Italy. For example, 
blackbirds, which from Germany and Scandinavia 
fly southward annually in huge flocks through 
Burgundy, did nt appear there. Similarly no 
larks were seen in October. In Flanders and 
Holland there were neither marsh nor water birds. 

RUSSIAN EXAMPLES. 

According itb the observations of Russian 
naturalists, during the first year of the war jack- 
daws and rooks disappeared, larks no longer sang- 
in the fields, and even sparrows grew very scarce. 
The eagle, a constant resident of the Carpathians, 
migrated to the Balkans, and the wild pigeon 
disappeared also. 

The president of the Russian Ornithological 
Committee, D, M. Rossinsky, has noted the in- 
fluence of military operations upon the migration 
of birds. Thus ordinarily in Central Siberia birds 
gravitate during the spring from south to north; 
in Eastern Siberia from south-east to north-west, 
and in European Russia from south-west to north- 
east. Seeing that military operations are pro- 
ceeding exactly in the region of these migratory 
routes, the flights of birds are powerfully affected, 
especially those of the stork and snipe. 

One of the well-known Moscow bird hunters, 
V. F. Razdobarov, recollects thalt in the Russo- 
Turkish War of 18(7-8, near Moscow, an unusual 
quantity of snipe was observed. The above-men- 
tioned French authority has noted the appearance 
in the woods of Flanders some time after the 
commencement of ithe war of numerous herds of 
wild boar, which had descended from the Vosges 
and Ardennes terrified by the din of gun and rifle 
fire. , 

CONCLUSIONS. 

The well-known ornithologist, Professor D. 
N. Kaigorodov, commenting on the appeal of the 
Petrograd Society of Naturalists, mentions >„hat 
an extraordinary movement of geese northward 
had recently been reported to him. It is evident 
thai; these birds could not settle in Mitau and 
White Russia owing to the military operations in 
progress there, and they flew away. The same is 
true with regard to duck, very many of which 
appeared on the river Volhov. 

"Of course," this authority continues, "it 
would be premature to affirm that this, that, or 
the other departure from the usual standard is in- 
dubitably the result of the war operations; but 
the war has furnished, and will still furnish, many 
interesting and valuable observations in this con- 
nexion. 



28 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



" Individual facts are already available. For 
example, I know that individual species of birds 
which ordinarily carry out their migratory fight 
through Poland appeared some iL'ime ago on the 
island of Ezel. In the Tauride province last year 
an abundance of every kind of bird was observed, 
particularly of those speciess which migrate 
through the Carpathians. Those birds, whose 
nests were usually situated in localities affected 
by ^he war were perforce compelled to abandon 
their homes and migrate to other places, which 
has evoked an increased flight of individual kinds 
of birds to certain spots. As regards animals, in- 
vestigation in this direction is less convenient than 
in tihe case of birds, though their wholesale migra- 
tion can alsoi be observed. I repeat, however, 
that I cannot yet express a final opinion till the 
end of the war, when I have a sufficient quantity 
of data at my disposal." 



BELLE VUE GARDENS, MANCHESTER 

Whit-Monday always heralds the summer 
season of that great Manchester institution, Belle 
Vue Gardens. And although, this year, the war 
has necessitated a suspension of the time-honoured 
Whitsuntide holidays we have no doubt that 
thousands of people, the younger generation es- 
pecially, will - contrive to make a visit to /the 
favourite resort. Even if the majority of them 
cannot go> in the day-time, they will find leisure 
enough under the Daylight' Saving- Act to spend 
their evening hours, at any rate, in enjoying the 
numerous and varied attractions provided for them 
by the enterprise of the Messrs. Jennison. By 
the way it is interesting to note that it is now al- 
most exactly eighty years since Belle Vue was 
established. The place was then but a farm with 
the only inn 'twixt there and the city, and so 
isolated was it that someone told old John Jenni- 
son (we believe he was) that he would "never 
make 'owt out of ft"." But, as all the world 
knows, time falsified the prophecy, and from the 
day when a cartload of monkeys with a few par- 
rots hanging on to the back in cages was. brought 
from Adswood, near Stockport, and exhibited, 
the enterprise began to flourish. 

SOME NEW ARRIVALS. 
Although the war has rendered it impossible 
for Messrs. Jennison to add as much as usual to 
their zoological collection during: the past year, 
visitors will still find some new 1 arrivals. Among 
these is a splendid specimen of the Indian buffalo, 
a doughty if domesticated beast, for it has the 
reputation of being able to protect itself against 
the tiger even. A pair of fine antelopes (eland), 
native to SouftW Africa, presented by the Duke of 
Bedford, from the famous Woburn herd, form 
.another notable addition to the collection, and vet 



another is the Tasmanian Devil, a smallish animal 
but wivh a big reputation for ungovernable fero- 
city, albeit the other day it was dozing peacefully- 
enough. It has been placed in a cage in the aviary 
which adjoins the lion and tiger house. The lions 
and tigers, it should be remarked in passing, are 
in excellent condition, and ilhe young lion born 
eighteen months ago is thriving tremendously. 
One lion recently underwent the operation of hav- 
ing a wart removed from the side of its jaw, not 
a Icrifling wart but one as large as a man's fist. 
Additions to. the bird-life of the Gardens include a 
trained Peregrine Falcon, and two naked-footed 
owlets. Of the older denizens we are glad to. see 
that they are all in. good health. The record is 
held by a female condor, known !co be nearly fifty 
years, of age, and probably older. In a cage close 
by her is an egret, whose plumes are called "os- 
preys" by ladies, and nearly opposite are the small 
deer which have figured in Mr. Flanagan's 
Shakespearean productions. There ios also in 
another cage in the vicinity a curiously assorted 
couple of creatures — a big fat-tailed ram and a 
young kangaroo. They agree so well that the 
ram allows the kangaroo to sit on his back. 

THE OPEN-AIR TREATMENT. 
The elephants, "Dinah" and "Daisv," are 
hale and hearty, ready to give joy-rides to the 
youngsters; and the sea-lions, who will swallow 
fish by he bucketful and still cry for more, con- 
tinue to do amazing natatorial feats. As to the 
monkeys, they are as mischievous and larksome 
as ever. The chimpanzee members of the tribe, 
who have a house of their own, are wonderfully 
human,. One of them has built for itself a loftily 
situated nest, a faot which seems to settle a con- 
troversy on the point whether or not this type of 
animal did such work. The nest here built is the 
first one ever known to have been made by the 
animal in captivity. In the main monkey-house, 
in one of the side cages, there is a Hamadryad 
baboon, the creature whose image appears on 
ancient Egyptian monuments. This type of mon- 
key was in the old Egyptian religion sacred |o 
Thoth, and, held the scales in which were weighed 
good and evil. It is a difficult creature to rear in 
captivity, but Messrs. Jennison have managed to 
do it. Indeed, they are every year finding out 
how better and better still to maintain the health 
of the mempers of their varied collection of ani- 
mals and birds, and ,the rate of mortality is con- 
tinually falling. Open-air treatment plays a large 
part in their system, and_they have so adapted it 
as to acclimatise animals from the hottest parts 
of the earth to the variable weather conditions of 
Maschester. Curiously enough, it is now the wild 
animals of Britain which ir is most difficult to 
keep in captivity. 

THE FIREWORKS SPECTACLE. 
For the customary firework display, which is 
the culminating attraction of a day at Belle Vue, 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



29 



the picture this year depicts "somewhere" in 
Flanders. The artists, Mr. B. Haistain and Mr. 
C. Caney, have, it can be said straightaway, 
added one more triumph lio their series of tab- 
leaux,. In the foreground they depict a typical 
Flemish town as it appears after a ruthless bom- 
bardment. Flanked on one side by an old-fashioned 
inn, in use as a hospital, and on the other by a 
convent — bc«;h of the buildings damaged by shell- 
fire^ — there is the half-ruined town, with its shat- 
tered walls and roofless houses. Through it runs 
a winding river spanned by a stone bridge. Be- 
yond stretches the country, a wonderful bifc of 
perspective work which gives the idea of a vast 
landscape reaching out to the horizon. So ap- 
pears the picture ere the firework time begins. 
Then >the Germans are shown in possession of the 
town, the near outskirts protected by trenches 
and wire entanglements. The British attack, are 
repulsed; but, reinforced, they return to the fray, 
stofm the town, and cause the enemy to retreat 
pell-mell. Following the battle, quite a realistic 
affair, the display concludes with the exhibition 
of a set of large, coloured transparencies illustra- 
tive of types of soldiers of the Allied armies. Rus- 
sia and Servia form one side, Italy and Montene- 
gro the other, while the centre-piece represents 
France, Britain and Belgium. 

Not the least pleasant features of the Gardens 
are the lawns and flower beds, avenues of trees, 
and conservatories, all at their best at this season. 
Then there are the various amusements prominent 
among them the ample facilities for dancing and 
boating, ever sources of joy to the visitor, old 
and young alike. 



TIGERS. 



By F. C. B. Rowden. 



The Tiger is not such a ferocious and blood- 
thirsty an animal as many may imagine. I am 
not referring to ihe dreaded man-eaters, but to the 
ordinary Tiger. Nor is it like its cousin, the 
Puma, who kills in its native wilds for killing 
sake, pulling down its game and leaving it un- 
eaten. In fact the Tiger is blessed with a craven 
kind of spirit and would far prefer to shrink away 
from the hunters in its jungles than to show fight. 
What makes it difficult to work Tigers in menag- 
eries is that Nature has endowed these animals 
with an ungovernable temper, and anything, the 
stormy weather, for instance, I should fancy, 
would convert it into a most savage and unsafe 
animal for the time being. This is, in mv opinion, 
why we meet with few performing Tigers com- 
pared with the many groups of educated Lions. 
If it was not for this uncertain temper, which 



makes it dangerous for trainers, fche Tiger would 
be quite an easy an animal to tame and to per- 
form with as the Lion or any other large species 
of the carnivora family. 

Writers on Natural History have staged that 
the Tigeress is inhuman to' her 1 young, and that 
when the hunters are about, the Tigeress very 
often when her cubs are full grown, make them 
go in front of her so as to' trick the men intoi the 
belief that one of them is her and so save her 
own skin. I happened to make the acquaintance 
of a Missionary, who was also a naturalist, at 
Wombwell's Menagerie, and asked his opinion — > 
he had spent many years in India — and he told 
me that the Tigeress was< one of 'the most devoted 
of mothers, and that the reason she had them pre- 
cede her was for the same reason that school- 
mistresses when out with their scholars for a walk 
always make them walk in front so that they can 
protect them better from any approaching dan- 
ger. 

Of tame Tigers in menageries I can speak 
from facts. Mr. John Cooper, England's great- 
est animal trainer, and whose portrait graces the 
handsome band car of Wombwell's Menagerie, 
on the second day that I made his acquaintance 
was in the cag'e with two Tigers, which had only 
arrived in that show the previous day. 

I do not think that I ever saw a tamer Tiger 
than one, a handsome full-grown Tiger, which 
was in! a show in the Midlands during the eighties 
of the last century. lie was ehibited in a large 
combination show of circus and menagerie simi- 
lar to that of the famous Barnum and Bailey's 
"Greatest Show on Earth," but, of course, of a 
very inferior size to thai: 1 mammoth establishment. 
This Tiger which shared a cage with a very spite- 
ful Lion, was decorated with a collar round its 
neck. A young lady, either a New Zealandcr or 
an Australian trainer, I believe,, however, of the 
first-named country, entered intb the cage and 
fastened a steel chain to the collar, whilst a col- 
oured trainer backed an elephant ag'ainst the door 
of the cage, on to tfie back of which the Tiger 
sprang, and with the Tiger sitting on its haunches 
in front of him, the trainer holding the chain, 
the elephant perambulated amongsM the people as- 
sembled inside the menagerie. The elephant was 
afterwards taken back to the cage, where the 
fearless lady who had waited in the cage with her 
savage companion, the Lion, which had been 
snarling without any intermission from the corner 
of the cage at her, took off the chain from the 
Tiger. It is regrettable to mention that after only 
about a monjth's time from then, the coloured 
trainer, a man deeply pitted from small pox, met 
with a most tragic end. It had been snowing 
heavily during the day, and he entered a cage of 
wolves and bears, without taking (the precaution 
of removing off the heels of his boots the hard 
snow which had balled on them. As the snow 



30 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



melted from the warmth of the wooden floor, he 
slipped and before he could again regain his feet, 
the wolves had him, and he either died there or 
shortly after his arrival at the hospital. 

Only recently there has been exhibited a very 
fine film from the Gloria Film Company, Turin, 
Ialy, entitled, "The Pearl of the Ganges,' in which 
two wonderfully It'ame Tigers play prominent 
parts. 

I was at the Alexandra Palace many years 
ago, the day following that on which a Tiger 
trainer was pluckily saved from a serious, if not 
fatal, accident by his wife who, when a Tiger 
was springing on him in the arena performance, 
broke the flight of *the furious animal by waving 
a flag in its face. At the show that I attended I 
sat next toi this courageous lady, but it is needless 
to state that the Tigers did not appear that aflfter- 
noon. Poor Helen Blight, in the early fifties of 
the nineteenth century, at Greenwich Fair, was 
not so fortunate; the Tiger which she had impru- 
dently struck with a riding whip, sprang at her 
thriat and killed her in the presence of the horri- 
fied spectators. She was one of the three "Lion 
Queens" in one of the three menageries into which 
Womb well's noted collection was divided on the 
death of George Wombwell, the original pro- 
prietor. The other two of this trio> of "Lion 
Queens" were Miss Hilton and Miss Nellie Chap- 
man, of ihe latter of which I hope to say more of 
in my next article. 

A trainer whom I had a conversation with at 
Wombwell 's, and who used to 1 perform with a 
couple of Tigers, told me that the animals would 
so often fight after their performance in the cage 
whilst he was still in with them. I told him that 
it must have been dangerous for him. "No," he 
sasid, "not dangerous but it makes W> awkward 
for my leaving" the cage as they always fight just 
before the door." This fighting" I put down to 
jealousy between the principal animal and the 
understtudy. Sometimes this may be seen at Bos- 
tock's "White City" Menagerie, where the ani- 
mals when they have come back to theiri cages 
after the arena performance will engage in a short 
melee, which can be put down to the same cause. 
Jealousy amongst animal performers is as common 
as ilt j is sometimes between the human understudy 
and the principal actor and actress, but shown 
more openly. 

Of the cowardness of the Tiger in its native 
jungle, I have mentioned before, but it may be 
new to readers to know tha',t in the tiger infested 
parts of India native women when they are busy 
with their domestic duties, place their youag ones 
on the backs of the tame native cattle, which ani- 
mals make excellent nurses, and wander at will 
in the high jungle grass with their charges, the 
mothers knowing that they are perfectly safe, as 
Vhe Tigers have a wholesome dread of the cattle's 
formidable horns. 



I close this article with an interesting anec- 
dote in which the Tiger is conspicuous by its 
absence with the exception of a bare line. A lady 
of my acquaintance, whose husband many years 
ago held a prominent position in Australia, spent 
with him, the lady then not out of her teens, a 
short holiday in India, and together with a party 
of several young men and ladies, went for a ride 
in the jungle near the hotel where they were stay- 
ing at, accompanied only by two natives. In the 
course of their ride the daring party met two well 
grown Tiger cubs, the Tigeress happily for the 
party, being absent, and also an elephant and her 
calf, 'the two latter of which, both of which were 
wild, came up and ate out of either their hats or 
their hands, whilst the snakes they saw were too 
numerous to count. About feeding the elephant's, 
I have her word which, knowing her, I should be 
sorry to doubt. Elephants, as we well know, are 
grass animals, and are equally endowed with as 
much curiosity as horses or domestic cattle, both 
of which are grass feeders. As both These classes 
of animals, if you keep yourself perfectly still, 
will come up and feed from you, it stands to rea- 
son that the elephant would do the same. On 
complimenting my friend upon her bravery, even 
if it was risky for 'the fearless party to do riding 
practically unattended in this jungle, I said how 
I should like to see her in the arena and to be 
with her there by her side. "Oh," she said, "I 
should be afraid." "What do; you think that you 
would be afraid of?" I asked. "Not of the ani- 
mals, but of the bars. !" Of the many people 
those bars have frightened, it would be hard to 
sav. 



ORANG-OUTANG v. MAN. 



FIERCE FIGHT ON TREE. 



From "Indian Daily News," 26th March, 1916. 



Considerable excitement prevailed on Thurs- 
day morning in the premises of the Kyd Street 
Court, when Mr. Keays and several persons — liti- 
gants and others — witnessed a fierce fig'ht between 
a large sized ape and an Indian on the top of a 
tall cocoanut tree. The ape is said to be the prop- 
erty of Mr. David Ezra residing at No. 3>, Kyd 
Street, and had been newly added to his big col- 
lection of animals and birds. On the afternoon 
of the previous day the ape got loose and imme- 
diately climbed a large sized tamarind tree* 
Every effort at coaxing- and offering fruit was 
made, but as the tree had a big supply of ripe 
tamarind the ape found no difficulty in resisting 
the temptation. The ape, which has a coat of a 
rich golden colour and is apparently very valua- 
ble, was allowed to pass the night in the bed which 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



31 



is Nature's gift, while below some of the employ- 
ees kept watch lest k made away under the cover 
of darkness. 

On Thursday morning the services of expert 
cocoanut tree climbers were requisitioned and from 
about 10 a.m. the fun began. 

Alongside the tamarind tree stands the tall 
cocoanut tree and on one of the men going up dis- 
covered that the ape had made himself comforta- 
ble on the crest of the tree. By means of a stick 
he drove it away and the ape with a bound cleared 
about 16 feet anh landed on a large branch of the 
adjacent tree. The man, who got on to the cocoa- 
nut tree, concealed himself in the perch vacated 
by the ape while two other men climbed up' the 
tamarind tree from where each of them were 
handed two long bamboos with some cloV'h satur- 
ated with kerosine oil tied on the top. Efforts, to 
light one of the torches failed owing to a strong 
breeze blowing and the man becoming impatient' 
began to poke at the ape with the bamboo. The 
ape quietly caught the bamboo and pulled off the 
cloth and threw it down. Thereupon, the other 
;orch was lighted and with the burning torch the 
ape was worried from place to place and finally 
driven on to the cocoanut tree, where the man in 
concealment promptly caught it by one of its legs. 
A free fight then ensued. The ape began to. freely 
use its hands and tee^h and his assailant lashed 
out with his stick, Though the man was severely 
bitten in the hands which were blood-stained and 
could be clearly seen by the onlookers he held, on 
till assistance came by one of the other men climb- 
ing up the cocoanut 1 tree taking with him a long 
rope. Both men then attacked the ape and after 
another desperate encounter they succeeded in ty- 
ing the ape with the rope*. Both men then tried 
to push the ape off. but it held on like grim death. 
The men then came down and it was seen that 
the first man was bitven through and through in 
some of his fingers. Medical attendance was im- 
mediately given to the man who it is reported 
was removed to hospital. 

As the proceedings were interrupting the 
Court work a request was. made by Mr. Keays, 
it is reported, to postpone operations. The ape 
was then lept master of the situation. It is under- 
stood that further efforts will be made to capture 
the turbulent ape. 

At about 3 p.m. two motor engines arrived 
and took up their position inside the Court com- 
pound and after connecting the hose with the 
street hydrant, the Brigade began to. play water 
on the top of the cocoanut tree where the ape syill 
tied to the rope had taken shelter. The Brigade 
kept up an incessant flow of water for about two 
hours and when a man climbed up /the tree the ape 
was found dead and the rope entangled among 
the cocoanut leaves. The object of the Brigade's 
presence was to put an end to the ape. 

It was further learnt that Mr. Ezra had 
bought 'this ape and another which had been sent 



out from China at a considerable cast. The ape 
which had caused all the commotion broke the 
bars of his cage and got loose, biting severely the 
man who had been especially sent by the Zoologi- 
cal garden authorities to secure the animal. Ifc is 
understood that the injured man has been suitably 
rewarded. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

THAT a derailed description of "Hamlyn's Man- 
gabey" (Cercocebus Hamlyni) will appear in 
the September number. 

THAT the s.s. "Tactician" arrived on August 
7th with a few birds for Mr. Wesley T. Page, 
from Calcutta. Even on this journey the loss 
was twenty, about the same as the last con- 
signment. Also 200' Rhesus Monkeys. 

THAT the arrivals from the Continental Ports 
have been 1 adult African Stripped Hyaena, 2! 
Chimpanzees (male and female), 1 male Man- 
drill (| grown, colour shewing well), 1 Polar 
Bear cub, 1 extra fine male Laponda Ape, 6 
ordinary Lapondas, 121 various Baboons and 
Monkeys, 60O Budgerigars, 1 large Hooded 
Capuchin, 1 Campbell's, 6 small Drills and Man- 
drills, 1 Barbary Ape. 

THAT the steamer "Saxon" had 4 Stanley 
Cranes, 2 Crown Cranes, 1 Chacma Baboon. 

THAT 7 Dogfaces, 1 Sooty, 1 Cherry Crowned, 
2 ; Vervets, 1 Putty Nose, 3 : Mandrills, arrived 
from West Africa at a local outport. 

THAT 5 Spotbilled Toucannets arrived at South- 
ampton — first for some time. 

THAT 26 boxes of animals and birds are arriv- 
ing on the s.s. "Norman" from South Africa 
for a well-known Menagerie Proprietor. 

THAT Baboons and Monkeys are arriving in 
Liverpool in small quantities. Grey Parrots are 
very scare. The importation of Amazons has 
not come up to the monthly average. General 
stock is very scarce. 

THAT a Beaver has been born at the Zoological 
Gardens, Regents Park. 

THAT a few evenings ago the President and 
Mme. Poincare were taking an after-dinner 
sl.roll in the gardens of the Elysees when the 
President was summoned to read sonic des- 
patches that had just come from the front. He 
had hardly reached his study, however, says the 
"Cri de Paris," when he heard screams from 
the garden, and rushing back, accompanied by 
his secretaries, the President learned from Mine. 
Poincare. thai, the moment he left her she had 
been attacked by a "strange being." 



33 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



While an inquiry was being made, Dr. 
Henri de Rothschild, who lives a few doors away 
from the Elyseesi, arrived on the scene and ex- 
plained that an ape which had been sent to him, 
had escaped fro mits cage and had been seen 
climbing over several garden walls in the direc- 
tion of the Elysees. 

The ape was found in a tree, bu't) it was not 
until a Hindu attendant had been summoned 
that the animal could be induced to come down. 

THAT a Grey-backed Trumpeter, also a Green- 
winged Trumpeter, have arrived at the Zoolo- 
gical Gardens, Regents Park. 

THAT a mascot Monkey at jfche Clifton Zoo has 
opened a cigarette fund for his old regiment. A 
notice outside his cage says : " I was many 
months with the troops in France; had a toe 
shot away and was gassed at Neuve Chapelle." 
He has now been invalided home. 

THAT Linwood Flint, of North Wa'terford, 
Maine, writes : — "On this farm of 160 acres is 
a, genuine porcupine colony that has never been 
disturbed (to break up their homes) for years. 
Oinly this spring one good sized Porcupine 
came trotting along a path leading to the ani- 
mal barn (which is a long way from their homes). 
We think it might have been the odour of Por- 
cupine in the cages that attracted the animal 
away from its usual haunts,. They are not so 
plentiful as formerly, and my men have to look 
for them in the depths of the woods. I am 
writing you an Article shortly on this Tree Por- 
cupine, " 

THAT an interesting account of the Sea Lions 
on the San Francisco Coast appears in the " San 
Francisco Chronicle," July 4th last. It might 
interest my readers : — 

"Chummy seals, that invade bedroom 
and kitchen, where they consume dainties in- 
tended for a bridge and bridegroom, are 
threatening the honeymoon of August Nelson, 
assistant lighthouse keeper at Ano Nueva 
rcok, about 110 miles south of San Francis- 
co, according to the story broug-ht back by a 
party of young women, headed by Miss Hazel 
Boenicke, just returned from the rock. 

"A few weeks ago Nelson married. Ano 
Nuevo rock is the scene of the honeymoon, 
because of Government regulations which can- 
not be stretched a poinF, and the rock is the 
rendezvous of more than 2,000 sea lions, of 
all sizes and ages. The lighthouse station 
there is in charge of Captain Harry Becker. 

" Prior to the arrival of his bride, Nelson 
and his superior officer were almost run off 



the island because of the friendliness of the 
sea lions. Morning, midday and evening 
meals were never eaten without a riot among 
the seals, and, being afflicted with regulation 
masculine carelessness, Nelson often left the 
door open and lost his dinner to thieving sea 
lions, which forsook the dainties of the deep 
for the fare of civilisation. 

"With the arrival of Mrs. Nelson, say 
the visitors who have just returned, condi- 
tions have changed somewhat, but ' an open 
door still means a horde of uninvited guests 
which leave no corer of the house unturned 
in their search for food. 

"Nelson, says Miss Boenicke, hopes that 
the Government will casry ou; its usual policy 
of disposing of a number of specimens to 
scientific institutions. This, according to 
reports from Washington, will be done on ac- 
count of the rapidly increasing number of 
seals on the rock. The herd has increased so 
fast that the rock resembles a Chicago hoVtel 
during a national political convention." 

THAT a wonderful photograph of an enormous 
Gorilla shot in the Cameroons appears in "The 
Sphere," August 5th. Here are the particulars 
given : — 

"The huge male gorilla shown in the 
above picture was shot by a German native 
soldier, seen standing by the side of the ani- 
mal, at Ajoshohe, Southern Cameroons, 
shortly before the fall of Jaundo- The pic- 
ture was taken by a young British artillery 
officer, who was made a prisoner-of-war by 
the Huns at Nsanakang, Northern Cacer- 
oons, on September 6uh, 19194, and released 
with other British prisoners-of-war on the 
banks of the river Njong nuring the retreat of 
the German commander-in-chief and his 
troops towards Spanish territory. Unfor- 
tunately the officer was unable to take either 
the dimensions or weight of the gorilla before 
the native soldiers "chopped" (feasted upon) 
the brute. Some idea of its enormous size 
and strength may, however, be gathered by 
comparing the gorilla with '.he soldier stand- 
ing alongside. The latter was* just over 6 ft. 
in height and was proportionately built. It 
will be noticed that the hideous expression of 
the brute is rendered sgill more repulsive by a 
great wart-like growth under the right eye. 
He is " adorned" with a German cap and eagle 
and carries a German service rifle at the 
"slope." Native hunters report that these 
fearsome inhabitants of the impenetrable 
West African bush are common in parts of 
the Cameroons." 



Printed by W. J. Hasted & Son, (T.U.), 306 Mile End Road, London, E. 



WILLSON'S LIVE STOCK PROVIDERS, Ltd., 

37, New Oxford Street, London, W.C. 

Telephone— Gerrard, 7708. Telegrams— Highbred Westcent, London. Bankers— London County & Westminster 

LONDON'S CHIEF EMPORIUM FOR DOGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



All our adult dogs are sold on 14 days' trial on condition that if not liked they will be 
exchanged for livestock to value from our stock within this period. 

All our Dogs are daily inspected by a Qualified Veterinary Surgeon. 



.A. ^ISIT IS IR/EJSIPIECTiF'aLXj-X- ^JE^TTIESTIEID- 

"BamlpiTs menaaerie magazine/' 

Vol. I. Nos. 1 to 12. Complete Series. Sent on receipt 

of 12/-, post paid. 
ONLY IOO SERIES AVAILABLE. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN, 221, St. George's Street, 

LONDON, EAST. 



TO LET. 



LIST OF 

List of Subscribers, for* Vol. II., 1916—17. 

The Earl of Lonsdale, Lowther, Penrith. 

The Lord Rothschild, Museum, Tring. 

The Countess of Jersey, Middleton Park, Bices- 
ter. 

The Lady Julia Follett, The Woodside, O.d Wind- 
sor. 

The Hon. E. S. Montague, M.P., Bridge Street, 
Cambridge. 

Sir John Bland Sutton, 47, Brook Street, Gros 
venor Square. 

Sir Edgar Boehm, Bentsbrooke, North Holm- 
wood, Surrey. 

Major Atherley, Croft Castle, Kingsland, Here- 
fordshire. 

The Clifton Zoological Gardens, Bristol. 

The Royal Zoological Gardens, Dublin. 

Messrs. Jennison and Co., Belle Vue, Manchester. 

The Director, -''Royal Zoological Society, Natura 
Artis Magistra, Amsterdam. 

The Superintendent, Zoological Gardens, Alipur, 
Calcutta,^ India. 

The Director, Zoological Gardens, Tokyo, Japan. 

Robt. D. Carson, Zoological Gardens, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., US: A. 

Dr. Penrose, Zoological Gardens, Philadelphia, 
Pa., U.S.A. 

E. A. Le Souef, Zoological Gardens, Perth, Aus- 

tralia. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Copenhagen. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Rotterdam. 
Dr. F. D. Baker, National Zoological Park, 

Washington, D.C. 
Richard Arnold, Tower House, Leigham Court 

Road, Streatham. 
Lieut. Thomas Buchan, Hepburn, Haddington, 

East Lothian. 
Dr. M Bernstein, 51, Cazenove Road, Stoke New- 

ington. 

F. E. Blaauw, Gooliust, St. Graveland, Hilver- 

sum, Holland. 

Wm. Shore-Baily, Boyers House, Westbury, 
Wilts. 

Dr. John K. Butter, M.D., Highfield House, Can- 
nock, Staffs. 

Mrs. Cotton, The Mount, Bishopstoke. 

W. Edmunds, Coombe Farm, Langton Matra- 
vers, Dorset. 

II. Earl, Newgate House, Cottingham, E. Yorks. 

Herbert A. French, St. Margaret's, Downs Park 
West, Bristol. 

Linvvood Flint, Waterford, Maine, U.S.A. 

Miss Hall, 76, Adelaide Road, Ilampstcad, N.W. 

Miss Howman, 6, Essex Grove, Upper Norwood. 

Rev. 1 lemsworth, Monks Fryston, S. Milford. 

\Y. J. Henning, Hillside, New Maiden. 



SUBSCRIBERS. 

T. Hebb, Brooklea, Downs Road, Luotn. 

W. A. Harding, Histon Manor, Cambridge. 

Homes Zoological Society, 318, Keith and Perry 
Buildings, Kansas City, U.S.A. 

Lieutenant T. Buchan-Hepburn, Letham, Had- 
dington, Scotland. 

H. Ide, Elm Lawn, Eden Street, Kingston-on- 
Thames. 

William Jamrach, 65, Lordship Lane, Stoke New- 
ington, N. 

Mrs. E. Jordan, Gorthie, Wokingham. 

Mrs. Johnstone, Burrswood, Groombridge, Kent. 

Alderman J. D. Kiley, J. P., 33, Gun Street, 
Spitalfields. 

W. King, 22, High Street, Whitechapel. 

C. F. Leach, Vale Lodge, Leatherhead. 

P. L. Morgan, Westfield, Elgin, Scotland. 

Dan Mason, Maisonette, Broadstairs. 

John W. Marsden, Thornhurst, Tewit Park, Har- 
rogate. 

R. Scott-Miller, Greenoakhill, Broomhouse, Scot- 
land. 

Mrs. C. Prioleau, Loxwood House, Billinghurst. 

L. Pullar, Dunbarnie Cottage, Bridge of Earn. 

Monsieur Pichot, Boulevard Haussman, Paris. 

A. Reeve, Hall-by-the-Sea, Margate. 

Ernest W. Robinson, Liscombe, Leighton Buz- 
zard. 

Gerald Rattigan, Frou Selen Hall, Caersws, Mont- 
gomeryshire. 

Warren Bruce Smith, Aubrey Lodge, Emsworth, 
Hants. 

G. de Southoff, Leysin, Vaud, Switzerland. 

Dr. W. O. Stillman, 287, State Street, Albanv, 
N.Y., U.S.A. 

H. S. Spencer, 109, Barcombe Avenue, Streatham 
Hill. 

W. H. St. Quinton, Scampston Hall, Rillington, 
York. 

W. R. Temple, Ormonde, Datchet, Bucks. 

W. D. Trickett, Lench House, Waterfoot. 

A. Carr Walker, Tyrie, West Park, Leeds. 

W. Wightman, Estate Office, Aynhoe, Banbury. 

G. L. de Waru, Les Lilas. Leysin, Vaud, Swit- 
zerland. ■"»*»» ■ 

Walter Winans, Claridge's Hotel, Brook Street, 
W. 

Captain Woodward, Mayville, Kingston-by-Sea, 

Brighton. 
E. Wuiron, 7, Rue Theophile Gautier, NeuilK. 

pres Paris. 
Messrs. Willsons, 37, New Oxford Street, W. 
A. S. Yates, Bishops Sutton, Alresford, Hants. 

The Zoological Society of Scotland, Corstorphine, 
Murray field, Edinburgh. 



p= 



>©= 




Hamlyns 
Menagerie 
Magazine. 



t 



No. 5.- Vol. 2. 



& 



SEPTEMBER, 1916. 



Price One Shilling 






CONTENTS. 



NOTICE 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

NOTES ON INDIAN MONKEYS 

HAMLYN'S MANGABEY 

THE DUBLIN ZOOLOGICAL GARDENS 

THE AMERICAN LIVE FISH TRADE 

GENERAL NOTES 



33 
33 
33 
34 
35 
37 



38 J 

4 



Telegrams: Hamlyn, London Docks, London, 



Telephone : 6341 Avenue 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East. 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station 
Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence fiye minutes walk. 

P O.O. payable at Leman Street, East. Cheques crossed " London County &> Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TER '/IS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from time of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back, TELEPHONE.— Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS. — Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIVERY. — Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

For the arrivals from abroad during the past month. Full Particulars are given in " General Notes. 



The fourth consignment from Calcutta is due about the middle of 
October. The following live stock is already paid for :- - 

1 Royal Bengal Tiger, half grown. 
300 Indian Rhesus Monkeys. 

3 Leopards, 50 Pythons, 1,000 mixed small birds, and 400 Indian 
ring-necked Parrakeets. Prices on application. 

The fifth consignment from Calcutta should arrive the first week 
in October, and will only consist of : — 

2 Indian Elephants, 3J to 4 feet high. Nothing more, nothing 

less. Priees on application. 

South African Arrivals. — Small lots of Animals and Birds 
will arrive monthly. Those at present under offer are a pair of 
young Kodoo Antelopes, 3 Leopards, Cranes and Baboons. 
Prices on application. 

Blue and White Foxes, 3 Blue, 2 Whites, all in first-class 

condition each £10 

These are at present deposited with Messrs. Jennison, 
Belle Vue, Manchester, who will be pleased to shew them 
to intending purchasers. They will not be sold one penny 
less than £10 each. 



2 Canadian Tree Porcupines 

1 Chimpanzee, Male 

1 Norwegian Pine Marten 

1 Australian Opposum, very tame , 

1 Indian Baby Rhesus, tamest ever seen 

2 Indian Rhesus, ordinary size each 

5 Canadian Black White Skunks (Mephitis 
mephitica) 



each 80/6 



each 80/6 



These take the place of the Indian Mongoose for rats ;>nd 
all vermin. They are entirely devoid of any objectionable 
smell, the scent bacs being abstracted. The only Skunks at 
present for sale in Great Britain. 



Note revised prices 



The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at The Zo< 
cal Society's Gardens, Regents Park, London : — 



1 Alligator, 6 feet ... ea 

1 ,, 5£feet 

1 King Snake ... , 

3 Giant Toads (Bufo marinus) ... , 

5 Small 

2 Adorned Terrapins 

1 Gopher Tortoise ... , 

1 Heloderm Lizard, poisonous ... ... ... , 

1 Pair Patagonian (Dolichotis patachonica) Caveys 

adult imported— very fine 

5 Fallow Deer, males, females, boxes and expences extra 



£8 
£6 
£6 
15/2 
20/6 
30/6 
40/6 



£10 
£30 



American Rattlesnakes, arriving unmutilated a>d of 
a good size. Prices on application. 

1 Macaw, red, in poor feather ... ... ... ... only 40/6 

1 Blue-fronted Amazon, extra fine, tame, perch on finger 

talks Spanish ... 60/6 

3 Cuba Finches each 16/6 

12 Olive ,, „ 16/6 

3 Mexican Starlings 

2 Saffron Finches 

Talking Grey Parrots 

Ordinary Grey Parrots 

Budgerigars, hens 6/-, cocks 4/- 

Yellow hens 7/6, cocks 5/- 
1 Pair Bleeding Heart Pigeons, imported, first class condition £5 



pair 


30/6 


n 


30/6 


each 


20/6 


,, 


7/6 


7, £10, £15 each. 


£3, £4, £5 


,, 


pair 


8/6 





10/6 



African and Indian Birds constantly arriving. 

Penquins arriving from South African, only very few. 

Prices on application. 

" Latest advice from Calcutta" 

1 Tiger Cub male, 1 Sloth Bear, 1 Himalaya Bear, 
4 Entellus Sacred Monkeys, 200 Rhesus Monkeys, 8 Ducks, 
200 Ring Parrakeets, 2000 Indian Mixed Small Birds. 



Hamljn'g Jttatajjerie Jttagajmt 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 5.— Vol. 2. 



LONDON, SEPTEMBER, 1916. 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 



fjamlgns ffiznagmt iKaga^itu. 



Published on the 15th of each month. 



Editorial and Business Office (pro tern) : — 

221, ST. GEORGE'S STREET, LONDON, E. 
Telephone: Avenue 6341. 
Telegrams : " Hamlyn, London Docks, London." 



Advertisement Rates, very reasonable, on application. 

The Editor will be glad to receive for publication articles 
and all interesting photos, the imports and exports of all 
stock, and foreign adventures with all wild stock. 



NOTICE. 

The subscription for Vol. II., 1916—17, is 
now due, 10/-, post free. If your name is not in 
the list on back page, kindly post 10/- without 
any delay. All subscriptions commence with No. 
1 of Vol. 2. Yearly subscriptions only received. 
Specimen copies can be sent post free on receipt 
of twelve penny stamps. Subscribers not receiv- 
ing- their Magazine should communicate at once 
with the Editor. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE. 

All Subscribers in Norway, Sweden, Den- 
mark, Spain, Portugal, Switzerland, Holland and 
United Statesi, who have not received their usual 
numbers, are requested to communicate at once 
with the Editor. They will in future receive the 
Magazine through the Office of Messrs. W. H. 
Smith and Son, Strand, W.C. 

By arrangement with Messrs. W. H> Smith 
& Son, 186, Strand, W.C.-, "Hamlyn's Menagerie 
Magazine" is on sale on the 16th of each month 
at the following Railway Stations : — 

Charing Cross (South Eastern and Chatham 
Railway). 

King's Cross (Great Northern Railway). 

Liverpool Street (Great Eastern Railway). 

St. Pancras (Midland Railway). 

Victoria (South Eastern and Chatham Rail- 
way). 

Waterloo (South Western Railway). 



NOTES ON INDIAN MONKEYS. 



MONKEYS DISTURB DRINKING TROUGHS 

The Darjeeling Himalayan Society for the 
Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, of Northern 
India, is probably unique in being the only anti- 
cruelty society in the world which has its water- 
ing trough system disturbed by monkeys. Many 
American societies are troubled by human van- 
dals in this respect, but the plight of this progress- 
ive Indian organization has no duplicate as far 
as the "Review" is aware. The Society has 32 
troughs in operation. In writing on this subject 
in the annual report for 1914-15, the Honorary 
Secretary, Mrs. H. M. Lennox, says, : " In addi- 
tion to the continual nuisance of the pollution of 
the animals' drinking water by human beings', 
the bamboo; aqueduct has suffered from the at- 
tention of monkeys. They play with the water, 
swing on the duct and even amuse themselves 
untying the knots of the lyarha (pliable creepers 
used as rope), and so disturb the supply of 
water." 

The Society has devoted much attention to 
the lot of pack ponies, and the bullocks used to 
draw the heavy native carts. The yokes used are 
very heavy and chafe the necks of the animals. 
The natives are very slow to accept a, change 
in their customs or methods of doing things unless 
they are able to see a direct financial profit. The 
municipal authorities in Darjeeling have passed 
an ordinance which makes' it compulsory to re- 
move bullocks from stationary carts and to sup^ 
port the yokes on bamboos. Efforts arc being 
made toi secure similar ordinances elsewhere. The 
pack ponies carry heavy loads up' the long - steep 
and stony paths incident to that country. Unless 
constant attention is given, to their treatment 
they are overloaded and not given sufficient or>- 
portunity to rest. 

The school essay work which has been a 
feature of the Society's work for a number of 
years was given up this past fall for "a sort of 
examination on the care and treatment of ani- 
mals." It did not prove as popular as the essay 
competition. 



34 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



HAMLYN'S MANGABEY. 



From the Annals and Magazine of Natural 
History, Ser. 7, Vol. xviii., September, 1906. 



Description of a new species of Mang-abey (Cero- 

cebus Hamlyni) by R. I. Pocock, F.L.S., F.Z.S., 

Superintendent of the Zoological Society s 

Gardens. 



CERCOCEBUS HAMLYNI, sp. n. 
Face pale flesh-coloured, with darker and 
lighter, larger and smaller spots of brown pig- 
ment, most plentiful round and below the eyes 
and on the bare part of the cheek, but absent on 
the upper and lower lips and on the nose. Upper 
lids whiter than surrounding skin, with white 
eyelashes. Iris of eye olive-brown; ball of the 
eye, where visible, white, with brown pigment-, 
spots. Brow-ridge white, with a few pigment- 
spots. Ears flesh-coloured, with a few pigment- 
spots. Summit of head thickly hairy, the hairs 
longest along the middle and forming posteriorly 
a parietooccipital crest, for the most part black- 
ish to the roots, with greyish tips. In front and 
at the sides this black crown is sharply defined 
by the greyish-white hair forming- a narrow brown 
band and by the hair of the same colour clothing 
the cheeks and the area behind the ear. The hairs 
on the cheek forming a long backwardly directed 
tuft concealing and projecting- beyond the lower 
half of the ear. A simliar white tuftl formed by 
the hairs behind the ear. Extending backwards 
■from the head over the nape of the neck and be- 
tween the shoulders there is a broad pale brown 
band, which becomes broader and at the same 
time fainter, less well defined, and more diffused 
over the thoracic area of the back, and finally 
dies away on the lumbar region, leaving the sacral 
region and the sides of the body greyish white. 
Throat, fore part of chest, and belly whitish; a 
large ashy grey patch on the area of the chest 
behind the mammae. Tail entirely greyish white. 
Outside of upper arm greyish white tinted with 
brown, of forearm blackish iron-grey between the 
elbow and wrist; inner side of forearm infuscate. 
Hands yellowish grey above, the palms and nails 
pinky flesh-coloured. Outer and inner side of 
legs and upper side of feet greyish white. Soles 
of feet and mails pinky flesh-coloured. Coat thick, 
almost woolly, the long hairs glistening. 

Head and body about 16 English inches 
( = 400mm.); tail about 20 inches ( = 500mm.). 

Locality.— Upper Congo, exact area un- 
known. 

The above-given diagnosis is taken from a 
living female specimen, still with milk-dentition, 
brought to London with an example of Wolf's 



guenon (Cercopithecus WoLfi) and of Brazza's 
guenon (C. neglectus). I 'am indebted to Mr. J. 
D. Hamlyn, the well-known importer of wild ani- 
mals, for the opportunity to describe it, and I have 
great pleasure in associating the new species of 
which it is the type with his name. 

With its pointed head-crest and long whis- 
kers this species falls into the category typified by 
Cercocebus albigena, Gray, subsp. Rothschildi, 
Lydd., and C. congicus, Sclater. From the for- 
mer it may be distinguished by its yellowish or 
greyish-white coloration. To the latter it has 
many points of resemblance, notably the pink 
fleshy hue of the face, hands and feet, the white 
throat, cheeks, and tail. But whereas in C. con- 
gicus the arms, the legs down to the knees, and 
the entire body with exoeptios of the chest are 
black, in C. Hamlyni the hind-quarters are entire- 
ly whitish grey, the arms are merely ashy grey 
(especially between the elbow and wrrist), and the 
entire body is whitish grey except for the ashy 
tint of the back and chest. 

It is regrettable that only one specimen of 
each of these two species, namely C. congicus and 
C. Hamlyni, has been seen, and also that no ex- 
act locality is known for either. That the differ- 
ence between the two specimens is not sexual is 
proved by the feminine gender of both; that it is 
not assignable to age is rendered probable by the 
approximate similarity in coloration between 
young and adult examples of other species of Cer- 
cocebus, namely of C. fuliginosus, lunulatus, 
aethiopicus, chrysogaster, Hagenbecki, and albi- 
gena. 

It must be freely conceded that the pinkiness 
of the face, of the soles of the feet, palms of the 
hands, and especially, perhaps, of th enails, sug- 
gests partial albinistic variation both in congicus 
and Hamlyni. If this were so, the two might be 
dismissed as piebald sports of the form of C. 
albigena described as Rothschildi, which these re- 
semble in length of whisker, absence of frontal 
fringe, and, at least in the case of Hamlyni, in tlie 
shape of the crest on the crown of the head. I do 
no, however, think that such a conclusion is war- 
ranted by the evidence; for, in the firrst place, the 
normal colour of the eyes and the bilateral sym- 
metry of the patter formed by the white patches in 
congicus and the black patches in Hamlyni are 
not suggestive of albinism. Moreover, the ab- 
sence of black pigment under the skin of the face, 
hands, and feet in some races of man and of chim- 
panzee and in some species of macaques is op- 
posed to the view that this defect is necessarily 
or even probably indicative of albinos in the higher 
Primates. Finally, although black is the preva- 
lent colour of the face in the genus Cercocebus, 
the face of C. fuliginisus is often to a great ex- 
tent flesh-coloured. As for the yellowish-grey 
hue of £he hairs in C. Hamlyni, this colour occurs 
too commonly in quadrumanous Primates, eg'., 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



35 



in some species of langurs (Semnopithecus), the 
young- of some species of Colobus, and in some 
gibbons (Hylobates), to be regarded as, of patho- 
logical import. 

Another possible explanation of the colora- 
tion of these two mangabeys is that C. albigena 
Rothschildi, or an allied form, is an extremely 
variable animal, and that the types of C. congiqus 
and C. Hamlyni merely represent two of its 
phases. The ascertained constancy in the colora- 
tion of other species of this genus is, however, 
entirely opposed to such an hypothesis. 

For the above-given reasons I think it desira- 
ble to describe the monkey in question as the 
type of a new species. If the opinion that its 
peculiarities are of specific value prove well 
founded, its departure from the ordinary dusky 
style of coloration prevalent in the genus is prob- 
ably connected with a difference of habitat de- 
manding different procryptic attributes. In look- 
ing for an explanation of this, one is reminded of 
Dr. Gregory's assertion that the white-mantled 
guerezas (Colobus) of East Africa are concealed 
when sitting in the trees by the harmonizing of 
their white plumes with masses of white epiphytic 
lichens which clothe the branches. It is possible 
that this new mangabey finds concealment in the 
same way. 

Hamlyn's Mangabey was purchased by Lord 
Rothschild and deposited at the Society's Gardens, 
Regents Park, where it lived for a considerable 
time with its fond companion, Cercocebus Jam- 
rachi. A description of this Mangabey will be 
given in the October issue. 

Cercocebus Hamlyni was purchased at a 
native village some few miles up the Congo River 
from Leopoldville (Stanley Pool) on my .first visit 
to that most interesting region. Whilst stopping 
at Messrs. Hatton and Cookson's depot, Stanley 
Pool, word was brought in that a white and black 
monkey had just been captured in the surrounding 
country. There were other monkeys with it, but 
of a totally different colour. My curiosity being 
aroused, I immediately started up river to see 
these animals. There was a Wolf's guenon, a 
Brazza's guenon, some Crested Mangabeys, and 
last, but not least, the white and black Mangabey. 

It was a poor little creature, tied lengthways 
to a small sapling, which I found out afterwards 
was the ordinary method of bringing monkeys of 
all sorts in for sale. I had taken the precaution 
of bringing various cloths, beads, etc. , for barter. 
Money was of very little use with those natives. 
A careful display of the stock in trade soon effected 
an exchange, and I felt assured I was the proud 
possessor of an hitherto undescribed species. 
Wandering round to the Belgian Post Officer-in- 
Charge I purchased some twenty of the largest 
Grey Parrots ever I saw- These, with one wing 
slightly cut, were at liberty yith the native fowls,; 



all would come up to the Depot when called, were 
absolutely domesticated, and took an especial 
delight in answering the calls of their less for- 
tunate brethren in the sorrounding palm trees.- It 
was in this particular village that I also purchased 
some strange creatures; one was called a "Shrew 
Elephant," a wee mite resembling an elephant. 
This, unfortunately, died before my return to 
Stanley Pool. I am indeed sorry that a more able 
pen than mine was not with me to describe the 
many wonderful creatures seen in that region. 
The ordinary White Man Hunter pays no atten- 
tion to these small creatures. His one and sole 
idea is Elephant Ivory and Hippopotamus, the 
latter to feed his marauding caravan, the former 
to enrich himself at the expense of the noblest 
animal that ever trod a forest glade — the African 
Elephant. 

In conclusion, I wish to thank the Baptist 
Missionary who so very kindly placed his whale 
boat and crew at my disposal for that journey. I 
have forgotten that good man's name, still, al- 
though it is eleven years ago, if these lines catch 
his eye, he has my sincere thanks for the great 
help given on my visit to Stanley Pool in 1905. 
JOHN D. HAMLYN. 

September 15th, 1916. 



THE DUBLIN ZOOLOGICAL 
GARDENS. 



THE ANIMALS AND THEIR HOUSES. 



By W. A. Henderson. 
(Reprinted from "The Dublin Saturday Herald.") 



The forty days of Noah's great floating men- 
agerie probably originated the modern Zoological 
Gardens, though we may go back to the begin- 
ning of things, when God gave the first man dom- 
inion over every living thing, and Adam as his 
first work undertook the difndult-task of giving 
names to the animals. But the greatest wild 
beast shows were seen in the days of the Roman 
Emperors. Pompey's Theatre contained, amongst 
other animals,, 17 elephants, 600i lions, 410 pan- 
thers, and 1 rhinoceros. Julius Caesar exhibited 
a vast collection of wild beasts, including 4,00 
lions and a single giraffe, which probably attracted 
more interest than all the others. But Titus beat 
all records at the dedication of the Colosseum in 
Rome, where 9', 000 animals were slain. Gordian 
let loose on one occasion a thousand ostriches. 
But though modern gardens cannot compete in 
point of numbers with the past, they certainly 



36 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



excel in variety of selection, felicity of arrange- 
ment, and humanity of treatment. When the 
Dublin Zoological Society took over the grounds 
there were fonly three buildings, a substantial 
dwelling-house, and a small cottage. The first 
was occupied by Mr. Godden, who undertook the 
keeping of the animals for a yearly salary of £30. 
The start was modest. For over a year there was 
only one animal — a wild boar. In September, 
1830, Mr. Godden received £2 for attending to> the 
wild boar, in June, 1831, a similar sum was given 
him "for feeding the pig." The cottage was oc- 
cupied by a woma who proved more troublesome 
than the pig. Mrs. Rourke was anxious to' secure 
fixity of tenure. She was told she would not be 
removed immediately. In 18<32l she was repri- 
manded for hanging out her linen in the gardens, 
and in April, 1835, she was told if she did not 
clear out before the next meeting she would for- 
feit her pension or allowance. 



THE MONKEY HOUSE. 

In June, 1839, Mr. D'rewet, late keeper of 
the King's menagerie, was appointed Superin- 
tendent, and Mr. Decimus Burton was engaged 
to draw out plans for a proper arrangement of 
the gardens. In June, 1831, the animals com- 
menced to arrive — 14 wapiti deer, 1 nylghai, 2 
ostriches, 2! emusi, and other animals. From this 
time, through vigorous and enthusiastic manage- 
ment, the Gardens began to prosper, and rapidly 
increase in the sumber of its exhibits. Entering 
by the rustic thatched lodge we t J urn to the right, 
and find the bison compound containing two of 
these hunchback animals, which were presented 
by the Canadian Govvernment in 1913, from Al- 
berta, where the last remnants of fhe breed are 
preserved. In captivity they do not suggest the 
wild buffaloes of the prairie, so vividly described 
in the pages of Fennimore Cooper and our own 
novelist, Mayne Reid. In the "1830 House" ap- 
pears a tapir from Brazilj, a docile pig-like animal 
with a flexible proboscis. He is worthy of note, 
for from him is descended the great equine family. 
Look at his hoofs. Far back in dim and remote 
epochs the horse and ass and zebra can be traced 
to a common ancestry — the perissodactyla, or 
"odd toed" animals. We pass to the monkey 
house, always the chief centre of attraction. The 
grimaces, antics, and gymnastic agility of the 
monkeys are a never-failing source or amusement. 
The house was built in 1857, but has been con- 
siderably altered and enlarged. The glass win- 
dowed extension for anthropoids has enabled 
squeamish visitors to escape the pungent odours 
of the house and view the chimpanzee and gorilla 
basking in the warm sunshine. The gorilla struc- 
turally closely resembles man, every organ, bone, 
and sinew are alike, and it is difficult to differen- 
tiate between the two skeletons. The chimpanzee 
is known among the natives of African forests as 



the soko. The gibbon, from Assam, occupied 
the next apartment — a lithe black-haired beast, 
with a bar of white across his forehead. He is a 
wonderful athlete. 

JOHNNIE AND HIS BRIDE. 

There is quite a colony of Rhesus monkeys 
from Bengal in the Gardens. The green and 
Diana monkeys, and the Lemurs from Madagas- 
car, a branch of the same family, are worthy of 
observation. Two Malabar sguirrels in the mon- 
key house, with long, silky black tails and chest- 
nut coloured fur, are remarkably beautiful. One 
chimpanzee named Johnnie was the subject of a 1 
biography in a scientific journal. After some years 
he began to sicken, and it was suggested Johnnie 
should be supplied with a wife. She was ordered, 
and a very young lady chimpanzee was brought 
across the seas at enormous expense. When in- 
troduced, the expression on Johnnie's face is des- 
cribed as saying: "Do ye think I'd be bothered 
with a brat like that." He died soon after, a vic- 
tim of consumption, and his stuffed carcase stands 
in the council room. We have to cross over to a 
cage adjoining the Haughton House to view an- 
other type of monkey. The mandrill is a species 
of Baboon, notable for its short stump of a tail. 
Its long tuberculous swellings on each side of its 
muzzle present a glaring study in scarlet and 
blue. When old it is the last word in repulsive- 
ness, tihe ugliest and most ungainly of its race. 
It has peculiar tastes and has a marked liking 
for all kinds of intoxicating liquors. 



THE ROARERS. 

From the Monkey House we pass to the 
dens of the carnivora. The handsome Roberts 
House was erected as a public tribute to Field- 
Marshall Lord Robert's, who was President of 
the Society from 1898 to 1902. On St. Patrick's 
Day, 1902!, in the presence of the great Irish sol- 
dier, the lioness Hypatia was transferred to the 
new house. The public were admitted in April of 
the same year, and on Tuesday, May 20th, it was 
officially opened by the Viceroy, Earl Cadogan. 
It is connected with the new Carnivora House, 
which was built on the site of the old Repository, 
which was erected in 1832 at a cost of £159 14s. 
4d. In these broad corridors we find a magnifi- 
cent collection of animals — lions, tigers, leopards, 
panthers, and jaguars. Travellers tell that these 
majestic and splendidly-coloured animals are seen 
to greater advantage in the Zoological Gardens 
than in their native wilds. The Society has spe- 
cialised in the breeding of lions, and their Irish- 
born leonine children are known all over the 
world. Over 300 1 cubs were born in the Gardens, 
and over £5,000 has been realised in cash, while 
a number of valuable animals were received in 
exchange for lions. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



37 



ELEPHANT HOUSE. 
We cross over to the red brick Albert House, 
where the elephants are domiciled. We are re- 
minded of a tragedy that happened here on June 
9th, 1903'. An elephant known as Tita crauhed 
the head of his keeper, named James M'Nally, 
under his ponderous foot. This "rogue" ele- 
phant was found guilty of murder and sentenced 
to be shot. 1903 was a year of misfortunes for 
the Zoo. The great storm of that} year did im- 
mense damage to the houses, and the following- 
animals died — a magnificent giraffe, a young ele- 
phant, a chimpanzee, 21 orang-outangs, 21 zebras, 
and a camel. The house is now occupied by two 
young elephants — Roma, purchased in 1912, and 
Sandari, presented by the Maharajah of Mysore in 
the following year. Sandari is six years old? 
Elephants are characterised by their silence and 
restlessness. Despite its massive corpulency, the 
elephant is full of vitality. Just watch it for a few 
moments. Trunk swinging incessantly, flapping 
its great ears, switching its tail to^ and fro, and 
continually shifting from one foot to another. 
I never see an elephant but I think of Kipling's 
famous story — how the elephant got his trunk— 
the finest piece of animal lore in the language. 
He tells how an inquisitive young elephant went 
down to the Limpopo River to inquire from the 
crocodile what he had for dinner. "Come hither, 
little one, and I'll whisper," said the reptile, but 
the crocodile gripped him by the snout, which 
was then "no bigger than a boot," and said], "I 
think to-day I will begin with the elephant's child." 
Then the little elephant sunk on his haunches, 
and pulled with all his might), and his nose began 
to stretch and stretch. When he got free he 
waited, but the swelling never went down, and 
the trunk remained for ever. 

THE BIRDS. 
Now a short visit may be made to the zebra 
compound, to admire one of the handsomest of 
animals, Burchell's zebra. The Romans called 
him Hippotigriss, or the tiger horse, an appro- 
priate name. The zebras come from equatorial 
Africa. Miss Nesbitt's aviary now attracts us tto 
the birds. In the year 1877 this lady expended 
£350 in the erection of the aviary, because she 
disliked beautiful tropical birds living- in the same 
house with monkeys.. The birds have now put on 
thier most brilliant plumage, and all the enclo- 
sures are full of unwonted life and sound. The 
gorgeousness of the colours, the rich iridescent 
hues of parrots, cockatoos, macaws, and parra- 
keets are simply indescribable. Across the lake 
there is an immense open air aviary erected in 
1906, 90ft. by 50ft., projected into the lake, which 
contains a cosmopolitan co flection of geese and 
other birds. Beyond that again is a dismal pile 
of rocks, streaked white with droppings; on them 
are perched some pinioned vultures, so motionless 



that they might be stuffed specimens. The bald 
crown, the horrid wattles, and the mangy-looking 
feathers of these horrid carrion eaters make us 
tremble with disgust. 

The flamingoes preening their pink feathers in 
the lake, the stately swans, and the diving ducks 
add lustre to the scene. On the daisy dotted lawn 
and the sanded paths a continued parade of beau- 
teous birds pass hither and thither. There is a 
lovely Saras crane from India, just like a fashion 
plate. Its dove plumage, its flexuousi bending's, 
mark it a dandy among birds. Dazzling is the 
golden pheasant when it spreads its nape plumes. 
But nothing in all Nature is more sumptuously 
grand than the peacock when it spreads its glori- 
ous train and sets all its hundred eyes shimmering 
in the sun; but 1 stand in front and shun a back 
view. If we want a comic relief we will find it in 
the long-legged stork and the foolish flamingoes. 
The Zoo' is a delightful place to while away a 
summer's afternoon. 



THE AMERICAN LIVE FISH TRADE. 



"The National Humane Review," March, 1916, 



It will be " news" to- many of the readers of 
the "Review" to know that carp are caught in 
great quantities in Lake Erie and shipped alive 
to Philadelphia and New York, where they are 
bought almost exclusively by the Hebrew trade. 
How this industry is carried on is told in a recent 
issue of the Wells Fargo "Messenger." The fish 
are caught with large seines, which bring in from 
500 to 20,000 pounds at each haul. The fish thus 
caught out in the lake are brought in from the 
fishing grounds in large carp "cars," which are 
floated on scows and keep the fish all of the time 
in the fresh water. The principal shipping points 
of this industry are Sandusky, Port Clinton and 
Toledo. At these and other places along the shore 
of the lake huge "ponds," holding as many as 
100,000 fish, are made, where the carp may be 
kept and shipped out as wanted. This system ena- 
bles the dealers to supply the trade during- the 
winter months when the lake is covered with ice 
and fishing is impossible. In order to keep the 
fish healthy the water is changed very frepuently, 
and large quantities of whole and cracked corn 
are dumped into them every other day. 

The safe trasportation of the carp to the 
markets was a feat that baffled transportation men 
until the tank car was designed. Now the dealers 
can start their shipments on Wednesday and 
have them ready for the Thursday night and early 
Friday morning fish farkets in New York and 
Philadelphia with a loss of less than one per cent. 



38 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



In order to accomplish this journey safely it is 
necessary to have special tank cars constructed in 
which the water can be kept constantly fresh. 
This has been accomplished by the Wells Fargo 
Express. Co. by pumping fresh air through the 
water- The pumps are worked by a small electric 
motor which derives its power from the car-axles. 
This answers nicely as long as the cars are in 
motion, but at important stops, where there is a 
delay of 10 to 15 minutes, many fish would die 
unless the pumps were kept in operation by a 
small gasoline engine. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

THAT Dr. Dreyer, Director of the Zoological 
Gardens, Copenhagen, is about visiting the 
Malay Straits to purchase specimens for his 
Gardens. 

The importation of wild beasts and birds 
has fallen off to such a considerable extent that 
he has found it necessary in order to replenish 
his collection. 

Dr. Dreyer has very kindly promised to 
give an account of his travels and purchases to 
this Magazine on his return to Europe. I now 
wish to tender the thanks of the readers of this 
Magazine to Dr. Dreyer for the most interest- 
ing article that has ever appeared in any jour- 
nal appertaining to Natural History — "The 
Birth of an Elephant at the Zoological Gardens, 
Copenhagen" — which appeared in No. 1, Vol. 
II., of this Magazine. A well-known Natural- 
ist, one of our most leading men, remarked the 
other day : " Hamlyn, that was the most inter- 
esting article ever I read, and should have ap- 
peared in the leading journal of the day." 

THAT the "Amateur Menagerie Magazine" 
seems to have fallen on evil days. The number 
which has just reached me consists of a fly leaf 
of Sales and Wants of a few of its members. 
Still, I presume it is typical of the Amateurs of 
England. 

THAT mascots are in great demand for some 
of the battalions of our new armies, and the 
Tommies have cast their eyes longingly towards 
the Zoo. In the early days of the war, when 
recruiting meetings were held daily in the metro- 
polis, regimental mascots were very prominent. 
The shaggy white goat belonging to the London 
Welsh was daily shown at different localities, 
and the mascots attached to other regiments 
were also much in evidence. But as our ar- 
mies expand so does the demand for mascots 
increase. Officials at the Zoo are daily being 
asked by soldiers for young animals. Those 



belonging to the ape family find most favour, 
for Tommy is fascinated by their tricks and 
movements. Animals are, however, hard to 
get in these days, and, unfortunately, the Zoo 
has none to spare. 

THAT the Council of the Royal Zoological Society 
of Ireland met on Satursay, the 2nd September, 
Mr. W. E. Peebles, President, in the chair. 
Also present : Professor G. H. Carpenter (Hon. 
Sec.), Dr. MacDowel Cosgrave (Hon. Treas.}, 
Sir W. Boyd, James Inglis, Charles Green, 
Lieutenant-Colonel W. E. Johnstone, C. j. 
MacCarthy, Dr. O'Carroll, Professor Mettam, 
Sir F. Moore, Professor Scott, H. F. Stephens, 
and Dr. Scfiven. Some new arrivals for the 
collection welre noted, including two rabbits 
from Mrs. Light Gordon, a barn owl from Mr. 
W. J. Vleese. An unusually large Patas mon- 
gey arrived on deposit from England, and it is 
hoped that the Gardens may be able to procure 
it permanently. It is of the same colour as the 
other Hussar monkeys in the House, but several 
sizes larger, and the red of the upper part of 
the body is unusually vivid. When standing 
on his hind legs he measures over three feet. 
Though so much bigger than the other speci- 
mens of this monkey at present in the House~he 
is quite of a gentle disposition, and when in 
special form shows himself off by capering about 
and dancing, to the delight of his visitors. No 
doubht, if he remains he will be an adept at 
opening the sliding door which leads to the 
open-air "treatment" cages. Vegetables were 
sent by Mr. T. K. Laidlaw. Visitors to the 
Gardens numbered 3,119. 

THAT at a monthly general meeting of the Zoo- 
logical Society of London held on Wednesday 
at the offices in Regents Park, attention was 
drawn in the report of the council for July to 
the additions made to the society's menagerie 
during the month, among the most notable 
being a grizzly bear (Ursus horribilis) from 
Wyoming, presented by Mr. Ellis Ashmead- 
Bartlett. The report stated that the number of 
visitors to the society's gardens during July was 
152,398, an increase of 19,411 as compared with 
July, 1915. The receipt's for admission at the 
gates during July amounted to £121,760, being 
an increase of £73 as compared with the pre- 
vious year. 

THAT Mi;. Woodward, the sea lion trainer, ap- 
plied to Fulham Tribunal for exemption. 

His solicitor said he was under contract to 
show a troupe of sea lions at 1 music halls, and' 
his business would be ruined if he were sent into 
the Army. He earned large sums and paid a 
weekly fish bill of £121 

"His difficulty is that he can't get rid of 
the sea lions," concluded the solicitor. " His 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



39 



only wish is that a member of the tribunal or 
the military representative will take them oyer 
for the duration of the war; but I must warn 
members that the British sea lion bites." 
(Laughter.) 

The offer was not accepted, but the tribuna4 
granted Mr. Woodward three months exemp- 
tion, with leave to apply further. 

I shall be delighted to have a few lines from 
Captain Woodward when in the trenches. It 
should be most interesting reading. 

THAT two baby chameleons have been born at 
the Zoo and are to be found in the reptile house. 
They are a little over an inch long', and look 
like nothing so much as two very small old men. 
These are the first chameleons to be born in 
captivity, but they appear to be flourishing. 
Their parents seem jealous of any inspection of 
their offspring', and make throaty noises at in- 
truders. 

From Georgetown, British Guiana, have 
arrived some crocodiles which are kept in a pool 
of hot water, and so far show no signs of home- 
sickness. 

As yet there is no scarcity of meat for the 
c arnivora. Indeed the war has brought them 
even fuller meals than before, for there is horse- 
flesh in plenty. 

Also an Indian Fishing Cat has been re- 
ceived in exchange. This is a very rare and in- 
teresting animal. 

THAT Mr. F. Martin Duncan, lecturing at the 
Royal Photographic Society, said that at the 
Hamburg Zoo a few years ago he got permis- 
sion to photograph the lions. On the way to 
the enclosure he heard one keeper say to an- 
other, "Let's give the Englishman a fright." 
When they reached the animals, he was 
pushed in, the gate was clanged to, and he was 
left alone with the beasts. The lions, however, 
proved less vindictive than their keepers, and 
he got the photographs he wanted, taking care 
never to turn his back upon them. 

THAT the arrivals at the Scottish Zoological 
Park have recently been a number of interesting- 
animals added to the collection at Edinburgh. 
One is a young kangaroo which has been lent 
by Mr. E. H. Bostock. Of importations from 
abroad, one of the most striking is a specimen 
of the anaconda — the great constricting- snake 
of South America — which is now in the accli- 
matisation house, where it shares a case with 
one of its old-world cousins, an Indian python. 
From the same locality are two baby caymans, 
which are only about six or seven inches long. 
Near them are some little toads, captured very 
near the firing line in France. On the pond 



near the entrance gate is a hybrid between the 
Australian black swan and the Canadian goose; 
on a neighbouring pond is a hybrid goose, which 
represents three species — the Snow goose, the 
Bernicle goose, and the Grey Lag goose; while 
in one of the pheasant aviaries is a handsome 
hybrid between the common pheasant and the 
English game bamtam. The swan-goose hy- 
brid], though rare, is not unique, as a similar 
cross has been bred once or twice in Australia, 
where it is known by the name of "swoose." 
The lion cub born in the Park last spring con- 
tinues to thrive. It has now been separated 
from its mother, and has as cage mate (though 
still separated by a light wire partition) the 
young jaguar which arrived at the Park at the 
beginning of June last. 

THAT the "Daily Graphic," 5th September, gives 
the following interesting particulars : — 
"The Man who Reformed the Zoo. 

"Dr. P. Chalmers Mitchell, F.R.S-, who 
is to speak on 'Evolution and the War' at 
the meeting of the British Association at New- 
castle this week, will always be remembered 
as the man who reformed the Zoo and brought 
the collection up to its present high level. 

" In 1903', when he succeeded the late Dr. 
P. Lutley Sclater in the secretaryship, a very 
remarkable gathering took place. Public. 
feeling ran high, and some thousands of 
'Fellows' turned up from remote quarters in 
order to record their votes. Among them 
was the late Baroness Burdett Goutts. Dr. 
Mitchell got in by hundreds. 

" For the last thirteen years Dr. Mitchell 
has held the position, and the number of visi- 
tors to the gardens has gone up by hundreds 
of thousands, while the old Mid-Victorian 
premises have been improved from off the 
face of London." 
We all live and learn ! 

THAT Dr. Frederick W,. D'Evelyn, San Fran- 
cisco, writes under date August 2!lst, 1916: — • 
"The 'Hamlyn's Menagerie Magazine* is 
a very desirable new growth, permitting ac- 
cess to novel items in the marketing of wild 
life, otherwise unobtainable, and interesting 
and educational." 

THAT Lieutenant T. Sanger, grandson of the late 
John Sanger, of Circus fame, has been awarled 
the Military Cross for conspicuous bravery. I 
should be pleased to place on record here a list 
of sons and grandsons belonging to well-known 
Circus and Menagerie families who are doing 
their duty to their Country at this critical time. 
I should also be pleased to know those who are 
not serving, in other words, Slackers, so the 
whole of the Show and Amusement World 



40 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



should know on what grounds they are ex- 
empted. Perhaps some of my readers, will send 
their names along. They shall be published in 
this column. 

THAT it was quite by accident that " Cage Birds" 
as the authority of that interesting announce- 
ment " Cocky Bennett" in our August number 
was not given. I owe an apology to the genial 
proprietor, Mr. F. Carl, which I trust he will 
accept. 

THAT I thank "The Worlds Fair" for its kindly 
notice of my representative, John Evers, who 
sailed on the s. s. " Saxon" for South Africa. It 
might interest some readers to know that the 
"important engagements" are to purchase on 
my sole account live animals, birds and reptiles 
for sale in Great Britain and the United States- 
Mr. Evers took out with him, for sale to the 
various Zoological Gardens, a really choice con- 
signment of animals and birds, and one very 
fine Kola Camba, the finest Chimpanzee that 
has arrived in this country for many a long- day. 
I was offered £100 for this animal the day before 
sailing, but decided it should go to South Africa. 
Its playmate, an ordinary Black Type of Chim- 
panzee, was sold for £70 to the representative 
of a certain world-famed Menagerie. Amongst 
the other animals were one pair of large Man- 
drills, the male being a particular fine coloured 
animal and one of the largest imported the last 
few years. Then there was a large male Barbary 
Ape, Red Deer, Swans, Skunks, and fancy 
Waterfowl. ' I wish John Evers a successful 
trip to and from South Africa. 



"World's Fair," 9th September. 

" The many friends of John Evers, fam- 
iliarly known as 'Jungle Jack,' will be inter- 
ested to learn that he has left for South 
Africa to fulfil some important engagements. 

He has had considerable success with 
Pinkey, the skating chimpanzee; also- the 
Boxing Kangaroo, etc., and we wish him a 
happy time in the land of diamonds." 

THAT the " Historian" arrived from Calcutta 
during the last four weeks with the first con- 
signment of live animals since 1914: — 5 large 
Leopards, 3' Hyaenas, 1 Sloth Bear, 27 large 
Indian Pythons, 195 extra fine Rhesus Mon- 
keys, 176 mixed small birds, 24 Thrushes, Bul- 
bils, Babblers, etc. The loss during the voyage 
was remarkably small : — 5 Monkeys, and some 
20 Indian Birds only. 

THAT some choice African small Monkeys, with 
about twenty Ibean Baboons, arrived in Liver- 
pool, also a pair of Black-necked Swans, some 



Ibises, Spoonbills, 50 Amazons, and general 
mixed fruit birds, all bought by the local 
dealers. 

THAT the "Norman," from Cape Town, arrived 
on the 15th August with the following stock 
consigned to< a Glasgow dealer : — 23< Baboons 
and Monkeys, 3 Stanley Crances, 4. Secretary 
Birds, 2 Porcupines, 3 Wild Cats, 1 Kangaroo. 
Rock Rabbits, Squirrels, Marmozets, and gen- 
eral Birds. Some very large Baboons were 
sent to> New York; the rest of the stock found 
buyers in Liverpool, Blackpool, Edinburgh and 
London. 



THAT various consignments of Amazon Parrots 
arrived in the East India Docks consigned to a 
Midland dealer. 

THAT a few Congo Monkeys arrived in Hull. 

THAT arrivals from Continental Ports are few 
and far between, mostly Budgerigars and very 
few Canaries. 

THAT three Ringtail Lemurs from Madagascar 
arrived in the East India Docks with six large 
Star Tortoises. 



THAT the following arrived on the s.s. "Hunts- 
man," September 9th : — 3 yellow Alexandria 
Parrots for Mr. Ezra, and the following for Mr. 
Weatley T. Page :— 1 small Barbet, 1 Golden 
Oriole, 14 Plumheaded and Moustache Parra- 
keets, 1 Blue Jay, 12i Quails, 6 Starlings, and 
some 50i mixed small birds. 

There were also 3i Trumpeter Bullfinches 
and 2l Robins on board. 

The Yellow Alexandrias were offered me 
some six months ago, but far too expensive. 

THAT Thomas Kayes, described as a lion tamer, 
was sent by Leeds magistrate yesterday to be 
examined by a medical board, and, being passed 
for general service, was discharged on the 
understanding that he enlisted. It was stated 
that during a round-up by military and police 
at Holbeck Feast, one of the largest fairs in 
the north, Kayes was taken out of the lions' 
cage as the performance was about to begin. 

THAT I have received a consignment of 36 
African Grey Parrots, with 5 Mandrills, 21 Dog- 
faces, 1 Mona, from a local outport. The 36 
Greys are the first to' arrive for quite twelve 
months. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN. 
September 15th, 1916. 



Printed by W. J. Hasted & SON, (T.U.), 306 Mile End Road, London, E. 



WILLSON'S LIVE STOCK PROVIDERS, Ltd., 

37, New Oxford Street, London, W.C. 

Telephone— Gerrard, 7708. Telegrams— Highbred Westcent, London. Bankers— London County & Westminster 



LONDON'S CHIEF EMPORIUM FOR DOGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



All our adult dogs are sold on 14 days' trial on condition that if not liked they will be 
exchanged for livestock to value from our stock within this period. 

All our Dogs are daily inspected by a Qualified Veterinary Surgeon. 



.A. "VISIT IS RESPECTFULLY BEQUESTED. 

"fiamlpii's menagerie magazine/' 

Vol. I. Nos. 1 to 12. Complete Series. Sent on receipt 

of 12/-, post paid. 
ONLY 90 SERIES AVAILABLE. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN, 221, St. George's Street, 

LONDON, EAST. 



TO LET. 



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 



List of Subscribers, for Vol. II., 1916—17. 

The Earl of Lonsdale, Lowther, Penrith. 

The Lord Rothschild, Museum, Tring. 

The Countess of Jersey, Middleton Park, Bices- 
ter. 

The Lady Julia Follett, The Woodside, Old Wind- 
sor. 

The Hon. E. S. Montague, M.P., Bridge Street, 
Cambridge. 

Sir John Bland Sutton, 47, Brook Street, Gros- 
venor Square. 

Sir Edgar Boehm, Bentsbrooke, North Holm- 
wood, Surrey. 

Major Atherley, Croft Castle, Kingsland, Here- 
fordshire. 

The Clifton Zoological Gardens, Bristol. 

The Royal Zoological Gardens, Dublin. 

Messrs.. Jennison and Co., Belle Vue, Manchester. 

The Director, Royal Zoological Society, Natura 
Artis Magistra, Amsterdam. 

The Superintendent, Zoological Gardens, Alipur, 
Calcutta, India. 

The Director, Zoological Gardens, Tokyo, Japan. 

Robt. D. Carson, Zoological Gardens, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., U.S.A. 

Dr. Penrose, Zoological. Gardens, Philadelphia, 
Pa., U.S.A. 

E. A. Le. Souef, Zoological Gardens, Perth, Aus- 

tralia. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Copenhagen. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Rotterdam. 
Dr. F. D 1 . Baker, National Zoological Park, 

Washington, D.C. 
Richard Arnold, Tower House, Leigham Court 

Road, Streatham. 
Lieut. Thomas Buchan, Hepburn, Haddington, 

East Lothian. 

Dr. M. Bernstein, 51, Cazenove Road, Stoke New- 
ington. 

F. E. Blaauw, Gooliust, St. Graveland, Hilver- 

sum, Holland. 

Wm. Shore-Baily, Boyers House, Westbury, 
Wilts. 

Dr. John K. Butter, M.D., Highfield House, Can- 
nock, Staffs. 

Mrs. Cotton, The Mount, Bishopstoke. 

W. Edmunds, Coombe Farm, Langton Matra- 
vers, Dorset. 

H. Earl, Newgate House, Cottingham, E. Yorks. 

Herbert A. French, St. Margaret's, Downs Park 
West, Bristol. 

Linwood Flint, Waterford, Maine, U.S.A. 

Miss Hall, 76, Adelaide Road, Hampstead, N.W. 

Miss Howman, 6, Essex Grove, Upper Norwood. 

Rev. Hemsworth, Monks Fryston, S. Milford. 

W. J. Henning, Hillside, New Maiden. 



T. Hebb, Brooklea, Downs Road, Luotn. 

W. A. Harding, Histon Manor, Cambridge. 

Homes Zoological Society, 318, Keith and Perry 
Buildings, Kansas City, U.S.A. 

Lieutenant T. Buchan-Hepburn, Letham, Had- 
dington, Scotland. 

H. Ide, Elm Lawn, Eden Street, Kingston-on- 
Thames. 

William Jamrach, 65, Lordship Lane, Stoke New- 
ington, N. 

Mrs. E. Jordan, Gorthie, Wokingham. 

Mrs. Johnstone, Burrswood, Groombridge, Kent. 

Alderman J. D. Kiley, J. P., 33, Gun Street, 
Spitalfields. 

W. King, 22, High Street, Whitechapel. 

C. F. Leach, Vale Lodge, Leatherhead. 

P. L. Morgan, Westfield, Elgin, Scotland. 

Dan Mason, Maisonette, Broadstairs. 

John W. Marsden, Thornhurst, Tewit Park, Har- 
rogate. 

R. Scott-Miller, Greenoakhill, Broomhouse, Scot- 
land. 

Mrs. C. Prioleau, Loxwood House, Billinghurst. 

L. Pullar, Dunbarnie Cottage, Bridge of Earn. 

Monsieur Pichot, Boulevard Haussman, Paris. 

A. Reeve, Hall-by-the-Sea, Margate. 

Ernest W. Robinson, Liscombe, Leighton Buz- 
zard. 

Gerald Rattigan, Frou Selen Hall, Caersws, Mont- 
gomeryshire. 

Warren Bruce Smith, Aubrey Lodge, Emsworth, 
Hants. 

G. de Southoff, Leysin, Vaud, Switzerland. 

Dr. W. O. Stillman, 287, State Street, Albany, 
N.Y., U.S.A. 

H. S. Spencer, 109, Barcombe Avenue, Streatham 
Hill. 

W. H. St. Quinton, Scampston Hall, Rillington, 
York. 

W. R. Temple, Ormonde, Datchet, Bucks. 
W. D. Trickett, Lench House, Waterfoot. 
A. Carr Walker, Tyrie, West Park, Leeds. 
W. Wightman, Estate Office, Aynhoe, Banbury. 
G. L. de Waru, Les Lilas, Leysin, Vaud, Swit- 
zerland. 

Walter Winans, Claridge's Hotel, Brook Street, 
W. 

Captain Woodward, Mayville, Kingston-by-Sea, 

Brighton. 
E. Wuiron, 7, Rue Theophile Gautier, Neuill), 

pres Paris. 
Messrs. Willsons, 37, New Oxford Street, W. 
A. S. Yates, Bishops Sutton, Alrcsford, Hants. 

The Zoological Society of Scotland, Corstorphine, 
Murrayfield, Edinburgh. 



f= 



5^JC 



^ 



I 



Hamlyns 



now 



At P 



NOV 8 1916 






Menagerie 



Magazine. 



No. 6.- Vol. 2. 



OCTOBER, 1916. 



Price One Shilling 



CONTENTS. 



NOTICE 

IMPORTANT NOTICE ... 

NEW REGULATIONS RESPECTING THE IMPORTATION OF FOREIGN 

BIRDS 

MY PORCUPINE FARM IN NORTH WATERFORD, MINNESOTA, MAINE, U.S.A. 

JAMRACH'S MANGABEY 

SOME OBSERVATIONS ON THE IMPORTATION OF LIVING FOREIGN 

ANIMALS INTO EUROPE 

THE ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND 

GIRAFFES IN EAST AFRICA 

ANY OFFERS FOR A LION-TAMER'S JOB P 

BIRDS IN BATTLE 

EGG TRAIN 

FUTURE OF THE MUSCOVY DUCK 

GENERAL NOTES 



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44 
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45 
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Telegrams : Hamlyn, London Docks, London. 



Telephone : 6341 Avenub 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St George's Street, London Docks, East. 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station 
Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence five minutes walk. 

P O.O. payable at Leman Street, East. Cheques crossed "London County & Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TERMS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from me of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back. TELEPHONE. — Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS. — Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIVERY. — Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING.— I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

For the arrivals from abroad during the past month. Full Particulars are given 



General Notes.' 



The fourth consignment from Calcutta is due about the middle of 

October. The following live stock is expected. 
2 Royal Bengal Tigers, one male 9 months, one 

male 13 months each £150 

Several enquiries already made for these animals, these 
being the first to arrive direct for years. 
1 Sloth Bear, 1 Himalyan Bear, 400 Indian Parrakeets, about 
1,000 small birds, some Sarus Cranes, Indian Monkeys. 



The fifth consignment arranged and paid for in September to 
arrive here beginning of November. 
Indian Rhesus Monkeys. 
Shamahs, Parrakeets, small birds. 
These being the last Indian Birds I shall receive during the 
present regulations, no prices can be given until arrival. 



Some few South African birds will arrive end of October. 
These also will be last to arrive from that district. Prices on 
arrival. 



Hares. 

1 Pair Patagonian (Oolichotis patachonica) adult 

imported— very fine 

2 Chimpanzees, males, good size 

12 Dog-faced Baboons 

13 Sooty Mangabeys, large, small 

1 Mona 

2 Rhesus Monkeys 

1 Marlbrouck Monkey, large, tame 

1 Norwegian Pine Marten 

1 Australian Opposum, very tame 

3 Blue, 2 Whites, 



each £60 



Blue and White Foxes 
condition. 



all in first-class 
each £10 

These are at present deposited with Messrs. Jennison, 
Belle Vue, Manchester, who will be pleased to shew them 
to intending purchasers. They will not be sold one penny 
less than £10 tach. 



5 Canadian Black White Skunks (Mephitis 

mephitica) ... ... ... ... each S0/6 

These take the place of the Indian Mongoose for rats and 
all vermin. They are entirely devoid of any objectionable 
smell, the scent bacs being abstracted. The only Skunks at 
present for sale in Great Britain. 

The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at The Zoologi- 
cal Society's Gardens, Regents Park, London : — 

1 Alligator, 6 feet each £8 

1 „ 5£feet „ £6 

3 Giant Toads (Bufo marinus) ... ... ... ,, 15/2 

5 Small ., ,, „ 20/6 

2 Adorned Terrapins „ ... ,, 30/6 

1 Gopher Tortoise „ 40/6 

1 Hcloderm Lizard, poisonous ... ,, 60/6 

American Rattlesnakes, arriving unmutilated and of 
a good size. Prices on application. 



Birds. 

Cuban and Olive Finches, 2 Saffrons, Budgerigars, etc. Prices 
on application. 



Ferrets. 

Wanted to buy : — 500 Ferrets for cash. Kindly submit offers 
immediately. 



Norwich and Yorkshire Canaries. 

Wanted to buy:— 1,000 pairs for cash. Any quantity bought 
from a pair upwards. 



British Birds. 

Wanted :— Goldfinches, Bullfinches, Skylarks, etc. State lowest 
prices. 



Hamlgtts iKenajme JEaga^te. 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 6.— Vol. 2. 



LONDON, OCTOBER, 1916. 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 



Hamlgn's ffimasmt iKagasfitu. 



Published on the 15th of each month. 



Editorial and Business Office (pro tem) : — 

221, ST. GEORGE'S STREET, LONDON, E. 
Telephone : Avenue 6341. 
Telegrams : " Hamlyn, London Docks, London." 

Advertisement Rates, very reasonable, on application. 

The Editor will be glad to receive for publication articles 
and all interesting photos, the imports and exports of all 
stock, and foreign adventures with all wild stock. 



NOTICE. 

The subscription for Vol. II., 1916—17, is 
101/'-, posti free. If your name is not in 
the list on back page, kindly post 10/- without 
any delay. All subscriptions commence -with No. 
1 of Vol. 2. Yearly subscriptions only received. 
Specimen copies can be sent post free on receipt 
of twelve penny stamps. Subscribers not receiv- 
ing their Magazine should communicate at once 
with the Editor. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE. 

All Subscribers in Norway, Sweden, Den- 
mark, Spain, Portugal, Switzerland, Holland and 
United States, who have not received their usual 
numbers, are requested to communicate at once 
with the Editor. They will in future receive the 
Magazine through the Office of Messrs. W. H. 
Smith and Son, Strand, W.C. 



By arrangement with Messrs. W. H. Smith 
& Son, 186, Strand, W.C, "Hamlyn's Menagerie 
Magazine" is on sale on the 16th of each month 
at the following Railway Stations : — 

Charing Cross (South Eastern and Chatham 
Railway). 

King's Cross (Great Northern Railway). 

Liverpool Street (Great Eastern Railway). 

St. Pancras (Midland Railway). 

Victoria (South Eastern and Chatham Rail- 
way). 

Waterloo (South Western Railway). 



New Regulations respecting the Impor- 
tation of Foreign Birds. 



A PROCLAMATION BY THE KING. 
Given at Our Court at Buckingham Palace this 
Third day of October in the year of our Lord one 
thousand nine hundred and sixteen and in the 
Seventh Year of Our Reign. 

Nowl, Therefore, We, by and with the advice 
of Our Privy Council, in pursuance of the said 
Act and of all others enabling Us in that behalf, 
do hereby proclaim, direct an5 ordain as follows : 
(1) As from and after the date hereof, sub- 
ject as herinafter provided, the importation into 
the United Kingdom of the following goods is 
hereby prohibited, viz. : — • 

Aluminium powder. 

Birds, live, other than poultry and game. 
Bone, horn, ivory and celluloid, manu- 
factures of. 
Cotton hosiery. 
Provided always, and it is hereby declared, 
that this prohibition shall not apply to any such 
goods which are imported under licence given by 
or on behalf of the Board of Trade, and subject 
to the provisions and conditions of such licence. 



The Controller of the Import Restrictions 
Department, 20, Carlisle Place, S.W., was kind 
enough to grant me an interview respecting this 
prohibition of live birds. It applies to every des- 
cription of live birds — excepting poultry and game 
— from every country. Permission may be given 
to the landing of any stock purchased before Octo- 
ber 3rd, but absolute proof will be required in 
every instance. The prohibition is only tempor- 
ary. Every importation will be dealt with on its 
merits,. I ventured in inquire to cause of the pro- 
hibition, but could not obtain the actual cause; 
it was suggested that the space occupied on the 
steamers homeward could be better employed. 

This is a very serious matter for some dealers. 
We all know there are Dealers in Birds only, also 
Animal and Bird Dealers; the former will be most 
seriously affeced, most likely ruined. I shall be 



42 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



only too pleased toi co-operate with any Dealer or 
Dealers to take this matter upi, with a view to 
the prohibition being removed from one of the 
oldest trades in the world. Even the Romans were 
enthusiastic traders and collectors of Animals, 
Birds, Reptiles and Fishes. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



My Porcupine Farm in North Waterford, 
Minnesota, Maine, U.S.A. 

By Linwood Flint. 

Come out and see me feed the porcupines, 
some are very tame, walking on their hind feet 
for apples, etc. If you cannot spend the time to 
visit, let me tell you something of these curious 
animals that have been my companions for over 
12 years. 

How the writer came to be interested in 
starting the only farm of its kind in America {an^ 
perhaps, the world), and making it a success-, 
would not 1 be of interest, but some of their ways 
would amuse any lover of animal life. 

The baby porcupine is usually born in May, 
and is covered with fine bluish hair and is very 
pretty. Sometimes there is a new arrival in the 
large cages, containing quite a number of strange 
animals, but no adult porcupine would harm the 
little babe. The writer has seen a male take the 
little one in its forepaws and walk on hind feet 
about the cage apparently to the enjoyment of 
both. 

A porcupine's disposition is different than 
most animals (including the human family). When 
eating there is no quarreling even among stran- 
gers, allowing two to take a bite from the same 
apple. 

They are easily tamed soon as they find one 
is friendly; they newer attack, and when attacked 
defend themselves with quills, striking a powerful 
blow with their tail which is their weapon of 
defence. 

Unlike most animals when chattering their 
teeth it is because they want to be friendly; a 
person making a noise similar with their teeth 
will note the quills lower at once and soon will 
be in repose, when it is nice to offer them food. 
They seldom bite but depend on their quills (which 
is a sure guide telling how tame they have be- 
come). 

It was the writer's good fortune to see a 
group of tame baby porcupines at play, and a 
jolly time they were having — running about with 



quills erect striking at some imaginary foe, run- 
ning backward, spinning like a top, each one 
trying to- outdo the other in feats of spinning and 
running about. I wish you could have seen them. 

On this farm of 160 acres is a colony that has 
not been disturbed for many years. In fact we 
feel safe in saying they were there even before 
the first white settlers. It is a rocky bluff, and 
they make their homes among the rocks, living 
together in harmony, feeding on the barks and 
leaves of hemlock, etc. , during the severe winter 
which has no terrors for them, as their paths 
through the snow, even when zero weather, plainly 
show. If it were possible to move 1 ^ acre of these 
rocky crags to some zoo in a large city, it would 
be of great interest. 

The demand for these grotesque animals for 
zoos, private collections, and travelling shows, 
has been very good, and they are shipped success- 
fully to dealers in foreign countries, who find the 
demand growing as people learn how interesting 
a study they are to all lovers of animal life. 



JAMRACH'S MANGABEY. 



From the Annals and Magazine of Natural 
History, Ser. 7, Vol. xviiu, December, 1906. 



Description of a Second new Species of Mangabey 

(Cercocebus Jamrachi). By R. I. Pocock, F.L.S., 

F.Z.S., Superintendent of the Zoological Society's 

Gardens. 



The young male monkey upon which this 
new species is based was deposited in the Zoo- 
logical Gardens by Mr. Rothschild, who has 
placed its determination and description in my 
hands. I propose to name it after Mr. Albert E, 
Jamrach, the well-known importer of wild ani- 
mals, who procured the specimen. 

CERCOCEBUS JAMRACHI ,sp. n. 
The face, ears, palms of the hands, and soles 
of the feet flesh-coloured, the face much more 
pallid than the hands and feet, which are of a 
decided rosy pink; one or two small asymmetrically 
disposed pigment-spots on the face and ears. The 
iris of the eyec olive-brown; the white of the eye 
with a faint grey-blue tinge. The hair everywhere 
a uniform dirty white. On the posterior portion 
of the crown of the head the hair is thick and long, 
forming an occipito-parietal tuft as in C. Hamlyni; 
it is also long behind the ears, but on the cheeks 
it is quite short and sparse., whereas on the brow 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



43 



there is a scanty and shaggy fringe of long, semi- 
erect, and partially porrect hairs. 

Length from the crown of the head to the 
root of the tail 12 English inches ( = 300 mm.); 
length of the tail 19 inches ( = 475' mm.). 

Locality. — Molinga (PMlungu), Lake Mweru,. 

The great interest attaching to this monkey 
lies in its remarkable coloration, which is unique 
in the genus Cercocebus. That the specimen is 
not a true and complete albino is shown by the 
normal tint of the eyes. It may be an albinescent 
variety of some species of Cercocebus, but of this 
there is as yet no proof. In the paper containing 
the description of C. Hamlyni I have discussed 
the possibility of the types of that species and of 
C. congicus being partially albino sports of C. 
albigena Rothschildi or an allied species. The 
reasons therein given for dismissing the hypothe- 
sis of albinism apply also^ to the present case, 
except for the total absence in this species of pat- 
tern showing symmetrical arrangement. More- 
over, C. Jamrachi differs from the three forms just 
named and resembles the typical form of Cerco- 
cebus albigena in possessing a brow-fringe and in 
the shortness of the hair on the cheeks. Hence it 
cannot be regarded, on the evidence, as a further 
stage in the albinescence, if albinescence it 1 be, 
raceable from C. albigena Rothschildi to C. con- 
gicus and thence to C. Hamlyni. In fact, C. 
Jamrachi stands by itself. It may be at once dis- 
tinguished from C. albigena albigena, its nearest 
ally, by its uniformly whitish coloration. 

A further point to be noted in connexion with 
this species is its occurrence in a locality lying 
about 10' degrees S. latitude in tropical Africa. It 
is, therefore, the southernmost representative of 
the genus Cercocebus known up to the present 
time. 



I have no general remarks to make about this 
most interesting specimen, only this, that being 
at the Zoological Gardens shortly after its arrival 
with a celebrated hunter and traveller from the 
Belgian Congo, he considered it an albinescent 
variety of some species of Mangabey. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



Some Observations on the importation of 
Living Foreign Animals into Europe. 

By G. DE Southoff, F.Z.S. 

(Translated from the "Bulletin of the French 

National Acclimatization Society," No. 8, August 

1916, by Frank Finn, B.A.). 



The filling up of gaps, the encouragement of 
good-will — so might run the sub-title of these 
observations. All we set out to do here is to* give 
a brief survey of the difficulties presented by this 
interesting branch of commerce, in which German 
enterprise was, if not supreme, at all events pre- 
ponderant, before the war. The animal dealers 
and their customers, foreign animal keepers, 
among whom we are, will be able, out of their 
practical knowledge of the subject, to fill up any 
deficiencies in what we are going too* say, and 
people in a position to take this reminder into con- 
sideration will see that it is a brief sketch stripped 
of all that is superfluous. 

The importations of live foreign animals are 
the work of men who too often play a risky game 
to please a difficult and varied body of patrons. 
In most cases this is forgotten, and they are 
looked upon as profiteers whose professional con- 
science is subject to annoying fluctuations. We 
hasten to say that his is a wrong view, for no 
trade offers so much difficulty to the seller, inso- 
much as he is very seldom in the position to> guar- 
antee his goods, while the customer is always 
ready to find fault with them. Like dealers in 
fruit, animal dealers of all classes have to keep 
down to its lowest limits the interval of time 
which passes between the arrival and the sale 
of their goods. Economists and traders are in 
agreement on this point. Thus they cannot be 
responsible for the state of health of the animals 
they offer for sale, which is generally not control- 
lable till after they have been in Europe several 
weeks. 

But there are other conditions favourable to 
success which have been too much neglected in the 
Allied countries, and have allowed the Germans 
to develop to an astonishing degree the import 
trade with which we are concerned. These are 
the facilities granted by the Government for the 
capture of animals in the colonies, those afforded 
by shipping companies for their transport into 
Europe, and finally — last but not least — the finan- 
cial support given to the importers by the banks. 

It is very difficult to find on the spot, in the 
colonies, capable people who are willing to capture 
and bring together collections of animals, even 
trifling ones. We know this by frequent personal 
experiments. Thus it is imperatively necessary 
to send out collectors with everything necessary 
for their work. Once in the colonies, these col- 
lectors find themselves exposed to all sorts of 
annoyances resulting from the apathy of the col- 
onial officials, themselves subject to prohibitory 
regulations, of undeniable ability, but often leav- 
ing much to be desired in their interpretation. 

Hence results serious loss of time and money, 
negotiations drag along, and so it comes about 
that when the necessary permits are obtained, the 
proper catching-season is over. These official 
delays could be appreciably reduced by allowing 



44 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



the persons concerned to get all the necessary 
permits in Europe before sailing, which is very 
seldom done at present. 

To take another point : the freight-charges of 
most of the companies are exorbitant, even when 
these companies do not refuse to take this live 
merchandise, which they think dangerous to their 
passengers, on board their steamers. So the deal- 
ers are forced, in order to keep down their ex- 
penses as much as possible, to embark with their 
cargo on coasting trading-vessels, to the great 1 
detriment of the animals, which suffer in condition 
from the length of the voyage and become sickly. 
It is owing to> this fact, in particular, that the 
prices of some species have risen suddenly. Im- 
porters whom we can trust have proved it to> us, 
showing us their figures. It would be a very good 
thing if we could see the shipping companies of 
the Allied countries give up these prejudices once 
for all, and facilitate what constitutes a source of 
profit to their countrymen instead of neglecting it. 

Animal dealers are not capitalists, and more 
than one of them has begun his business with 
nothing at his back but his zeal for the work 
(even among the most famous German dealers, 
there are some who have begun their enterprises 
on a capital of a few marks). When, after a 
modest start, and some disappointments whiqh 
the public generally knows nothing about, they 
can undertake business of a wider scope, what 
pulls them up, hindering them from making head- 
way against the ruinous foreign competitor, is 
almost always the want of ready money, or at any 
rate some financial support which gives them a 
chance to spend money without cutting everything 
down, an indispensable condition of success in 
the countries oversea. Alas ! they are generally 
reduced to borrowing at unreasonable rates, for 
Credit Establishments will not look upon their 
business as a paying one. There is too great a 
tendency to consider an expedition "after ani- 
mals" as an expensive freak, which, if successful, 
has nothing attaching to it of use to the country. 
The result of this was that inferiority in position of 
the importers in the Allied countries to their Ger- 
man confreres which obtained before the war. 
Permit us to say, with regard to this, that they 
were not wanting either in intelligence, in hon- 
esty, or in initiative, and that in the second of 
these qualities they were generally a long way 
ahead of the most noted of their lucky German 
competitors. The only thing one could say 
against some of them was that their knowledge of 
zoology was too slight. 

But how could one expect them to learn, 
when all their time was often taken up with more 
pressing work which they could not afford to hand 
over to employees? An economic revolution does 
not come about in a day. If naturalist's, and in 
particular, keepers of foreign animals, among the 



Allied nations wish henceforth, ^.nd especially 
after the war, as we are sure they do, to be able 
to get the foreign animals they want, which come 
from their colonies, from the dealers of their own 
countries, they ought at once to set about facili- 
tating the importation of these. The support of 
Government, the facilities afforded by shipping 
oompariies and by ldnding establishments, are 
the three cardinal points to be made in order to 
succeed. And, to win in commercial war, let us 
not forget that intelligence and goodwill must — 
just as in war of the other sort — be backed up by 
generously afforded financial support. 



THE ROYAL ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY 
OF IRELAND. 

The weekly meeting of th° Council of the 
Royal Zoological Society of Ireland was held at 
the Gardens on the 23rd September, the President, 
Mr. W. E>. Peebles, in the chair. The Secretary 
announced the arrival of a number of interesting 
animals, received yesterday, in exchange for a 
pair of lion cubs. These included six monkeys, a 
Great Anteater, and a pair/ of African Hyrax. The 
anteater may be seen in one of the end cages of 
the Monkey House. This very curious animal 
with long snout, flexible tongue, and great hairy 
tail, has very rarely been exhibited in Dublin. He 
in entirely toothless, and licks up his insect food 
with his worm-like tongue. The hyraxes are in 
one of the open-air cages of the Haughton House. 
Though only the size of small rabbits, they are 
related to the assemblange of the large hoofed 
animals, and should possible be placed, in a classi- 
fication of living beasts, next to the elephant. A 
member of this family that inhabits Palestine and 
the Sinai Peninsula is the "coney" of the Author- 
ised English Bible. Hyraxes are Aery seldom 
to be seen alive in this country. 

On the 2nd October the Council met at the 
weekly breakfast on Saturday morning at the 
Gardens — the President, Mr. Peebles, in the chair. 
Rev. Canon R. McClean, LL.D., Rathkeale, Co. 
Limerick, at present serving as Chaplain to the 
Forces, was elected a member. Mrs. Kenworthy, 
North Frederick Street, was elected a Garden 
Subscriber. 



GIRAFFES IN EAST AFRICA. 

Mr. A. G. Ross, who is serving in the Royal 
Engineers in German East Africa, sends an inter- 
esting letter to the " Postal and Telegraph 
Record." 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



45 



He begins by describing the journey up from 
Mombasa in motor lorries, and the difficulties at- 
tending it owing to swamps, incessant rain, terri- 
ble roads and lack of bridges (blown up by the 
Germans in their retreat). 

"After being at Aruschi," he continues, "for 
about ten days (most of the time in hospital), we 
proceeded by ox wagons to. Lolkissali, a distance 
of 50 miles, which took 12 days to perform. 

"Some parts of this road had never been 
travelled by white people before. It was cut 
through the jungle, and all sorts of wild animals 
were about at night. 

" From Lolkissali we went by mule wagon to 
Upome, 60 miles further on, and the first night 
.were attacked by lions. The giraffes are causing 
more trouble to the telegraph than any other ani- 
mals, as they go about at night and run into the 
wires and down they come, and the wire is 'dis' 
until next morning. 

"The only soft time we had was when the 
giraffes broke the wire at about 7 p.m. and then 
we knew that we were all right for a good night's 
sleep. " 



Any offers for a Lion-Tamer's Job ? 

NO MARKET FOR WILD BEASTS. 



A lion-taming problem has arisen with one of 
the showmen at Holbeck Feast, says "The York- 
shire Evening Post." 

In the "round-up" conducted by the military 
authorities on the fair ground the other night a 
young fellow of 24, named Timothy Kayes, des- 
cribed as a lion-tamer, was impressed, but was 
yesterday granted a fortnight's grace by the local 
recruiting officer before being required to "join 
up." In the interval, his father, who is the pro- 
prietor of the show, is faced with the difficulty 
of finding another lion-tamer, or, alternatively, of 
finding a purchaser for three lions, the value of 
which is placed at .£400. 

As the proprietor explained to a representa- 
tive of "The Yorkshire Evening Post" this after- 
noon, he is in a quandary. He himself is getting 
on in years, and has neither the experience nor the 
nerve to enter a cage of lions. On the other hand 
lions are a "drug on the menagerie market." He 
sees no chance of selling them, and as they are 
not the kind of animal that can be " turned out to 
grass," he is at a loss what to do with them. 



Meanwhile the show will go on for the next 
fortnight, and young Kayes, "by permission of 
the Army Authorities," will perform in the lions' 
d\r.i as usual, and will give a cheerful welcome to 
any man, young or old, who is ready to succeed 
him. "We don't anticipate a rush of applicants," 
he added. " In my own case, I became a lion- 
tamer through force of circumstances. My eldest 
brother, who used to have the job, joined the 
Army this year along with another brother, and 
my father, who. is the proprietor of the show, was 
on his beam-ends to find a man. Standing under 
five feet, I had previously been the circus clown 
and tumbler in the ring, but 1 I had been about the 
lions a good deal in assisting my brother to feed 
them 1 , and so my father asked me if I would go 
into the cage. 

"I didn't fancy the job, but I could not see 
my father 'stuck'; and, as two. of the lionesses 
had been well broken by my brother, I took the 
job on. The first time I ever went into the cage 
was some months back at Dewsbury, and I shall 
never forget the night. As soon as I got in, with 
a chair and a fork held in front of me, the animals 
knew at once that they had got a stranger, and 
they gave me a terrifying time. There were two 
doors, and, growling fearfully, seemed determined 
to keep me there. Finally my father, seeing the 
predicament I was in, got a bar to one of the 
animals, and as he forced it to a corner I dashed 
to the door and got out. 

"In another cage, where there is an untam- 
able lioness, I had a hair-raising experience before 
I got out. One of the spectators remarked, 'Tha 
looks white, lad,' and I admitted that I never 
felt so 'white' before. 

"But I have got confidence since then, and 
lion-taming is all right when you are used to it. 
Still, it is not every man-s job, and I feel sorry 
that I have to leave my father with three lions on 
his hands and no one to undertake either the feed- 
ing or the performing." 



BIRDS IN BATTLE. 



SONG OF NIGHTINGALES UNDISTURBED 
BY BOMBARDMENTS. 



M. Edmond Perrier, of the Institute of 
France, has been collecting evidence of how ani- 
mals within the firing zone are affected by the 
battle. 

He states that the mass of evidence leads to 
the conclusion that birds and wild beasts are 



46 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



indifferent to' the noise of battle, and prefer it to 
the treacherous quiet of pease, when the inhabi- 
tants of the countryside have plenty of time to 
hunt and otherwise annoy them. 

Nightingales and larks sing close to the 
front, and no bombardment has been fierce enough 
to stop their song. 

In the trenches cats show no fear until the 
bombardment becomes intense, when they hide 
in the inner recesses. 

A dog was accustomed to sleep in an outer 
trench, but one day puppies were born, when it 
insisted on removing to a safer place with the 
family. 



EGG TRAIN. 



G.E. RAILWAY CAMPAIGN IN 
EAST ANGLIA. 



The first move is to be made next week in a 
great scheme to stimulate food production in that 
wide section of the eastern counties served by the 
Great Eastern Railway. 

Commencing on Monday, the company will 
run an egg and poultry demonstration train 
throughout Norfolk and Suffolk to impress upon 
producers- of all classes, and more especially far- 
mers, the undeveloped capacity of their holdings. 
If justified by results in the Diss area, which is 
the first to be visited, the demonstration will be 
extended over the whole of East Anglia. 

The train, consisting of five vehicles, will 
visit about 20 centres within the district named, 
remaining at each one day. As far as possible 
the time of the weekly markets will be selected. 



FOUR DEMONSTRATION VANS. 

Four vans ha\e been specially fitted to demon- 
strate the latest and most suitable forms of poul- 
try houses and other appliances for practical 
operations and the best systems for profitable 
production of eggs and poultry. 

Displays will be made of the class of eggs 
and chickens which command the highest returns, 
and methods of testing, grading, and packing 
eggs in conformity with the requirements of 
traders and consumers will be shown. 



REACHING THE VILLAGES. 

Following the demonstration train, local con- 
ferences will be arranged throughout the entire 
area, and it is also hoped to send a motor demon- 
stration van to villages far distant from the rail- 
way. 

The company has already announced import- 
ant concessions in respect to farm produce rates, 
and will endeavour to expedite in every way the 
conveyance of goods to consuming areas. 

Norfolk and Suffolk produce yearly about 
7:5, 000,000 of eggs, but it is computed that these 
two counties could easily send forth 400,000,000 
every year, in addition to a vastly increased num- 
ber of chickens, ducks, geese, and turkeys. The 
latent possibilities, therefore, are in cash value 
upwards of one and three-quarter million pounds 
sterling. 

LONDON'S BIG MOUTH. 

Before the war Greater London consumed up- 
wards of 800,000,000 eggs and 7 millions fowls 
every year. It is plain, therefore, that a market 
is ready to hand for Eastern County enterprise. 

The country generally is dependent upon im- 
ports for 40' per cent, of its eggs and poultry, and 
the extent of this trade can be imagined when it 
is noted that in 1913- nearly 180^,000 tons of eggs 
and 14,000' tons of poultry were brought over- 
seas to England. 

WHY PRICES ARE HIGH. 

As imports have dropped by about half, the 
h'gh prices prevailing can be understood. 

Mr. Edward Brown, F.L.S., who is to ac- 
company the train as lecturer and demonstrator, 
to-day conducted a party of visitors over the well- 
appointed train at Liverpool Street Station. 

He proved himself a mine of information 
about the egg, the only question he could not 
answer being the one as to why one hem laid a 
brown egg and the other a white one. 

GAVE IT UP. 

He had studied and made experiments for 
over 30 years, he said, but had been obliged to 
give it up. 

Birds reared and fed in exactly the same 
way would produce differently coloured eggs, and 
all he could say with assurance was that it was 
quite a fallacy to suppose that one was better than 
the other. 

Mr. Brown, however, expected that the pub- 
lic would still exhibit its fond and touching pre- 
ference for the egg' with the brown shell. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



47 



FUTURE OF THE MUSCOVY DUCK. 

By F. Finn, B.A., F.Z.S. 

What price a breed of poultry which makes 
no noise, lays well, and yet produces male birds 
of 'fine table size, does not scratch, is a good 
mother, and will live and breed well anywhere, 
either in close confinement or at large? Such a 
bird, you will say, if you know anything about 
poultry, does not exist — we only wish it did ! We 
all know what fowls and ordinary ducks can do 
in the matter of noise, though in the one case 
it is practically only the male, and in the other 
the female, that is the nuisance; for the wheezing 
note of the drake is nothing to object to, and hens, 
without a cock to lead the chorus, do very little 
in the way of cackling. Still, hens will scratch 
at all times, and cannot be kept in good condition 
in close confinement without scratching exercise; 
and ducks, confined in a small space without a 
pond, soon get sore-eyed, fat, and draggled, and 
make their surroundings smelly and sloppy. 
Moreover, the best laying breeds, the Leghorn 
fowls and Indian Runner ducks, are small in 
size, a point which weighs seriously against them 
when one considers half the young one rears 
are certain to be smalls, only useful tlo eat. 
Moreover, they will not rear their own young. 

Yet there is a bird which apparently possesses 
all the qualities I mentioned at the start, and 
that one which is neither rare nor expensive — 
the Muscovy Duck. This bird is, as nearly as 
possible, mute; the drake only hisses and puffs, 
and the duck only quacks under great excitement 
or fear, and then a single weak exclamation re- 
lieves her emotions. 

The female bird is about the size of a Runner 
Duck, though of very different build, being long- 
tailed, low-set, and of horizontal carriage; the 
male, on the other hand, is twice as large, and 
in fact grows as big as a small goose, just the 
fdeal size for a table bird for a big family. It is 
quite true that the meat is not so good as that 
of the common duck, being less rich in flavour; 
but it is as good as goose, and the bird does not 
lay on fat like a goose, even when kept in close 
confinement, so that the greasiness so many 
people object to in the goose, and in large com- 
mon ducks for that matter, is not here present 
as a drawback. Being ducks, Muscovies, of 
course, do> not scratch; and they have the pecu- 
liarity, unique among poultry, in keeping well 
and in good breeding condition anywhere, even 
in the closest confinement, for thev do not care 
for exercise, and can do well without if, without 
getting fat, although being constitutionally lazy. 
If there is water, they will make use of it in the 
ordinary way, though less freely than common 
ducks, if there is no pond, they will keep healthy 
with only drinking water, and never seem to miss 
a swim, while they do not make their surroundings 
smelly and sloppy as common clucks do. 



The ducks are most admirable sitters and 
mothers; with them, there is no straggling 
around of ducklings to be chilled or devoured by 
vermin. The Muscovy's ducklings keep close 
to her; she takes them for a swim and then 
comes ashore and broods them, and she is a brave 
and powerful bird, so good a guardian to her 
brood that, in years of breeding these birds at 
the Zoo, they have never lost a duckling by rats 
or by the carrion-crows which patrol London in 
the grey of the morning, seeking what they may 
devour. The ducklings are also, in themselves, 
exceedingly hardy; in spite of the care the mother 
takes of them, they can dispense with her just 
as soon as* other ducklings can, and I have even 
known a single one reared in an aviary from a 
few days old which had no mother at all. The 
owner said he did not even take it in at night, 
for there was a rockery in the aviary to which 
it retired, and he "could not catch the little 
devil." 

The pens in which these birds have been bred 
for years past at the Zoo are between the Lions' 
and the Wolves' dens, and are each only about 
half-a-dozen yards square, though grassed and 
provided with small round ponds. Broods have 
numbered from half-a-dozen to twice that number, 
and when the ducklings have been taken away 
while still in the down, the duck has shortly after 
laid and sat again and reared another brood. 
There has been no> shelter given, except small 
kennels in which the birds laid, and in one case 
I noted the old duck always carefully took her 
brood into the little house to pass the night; no 
doubt this was usually done. Such nesting ac- 
commodation is all the housing these birds need, 
and they can do even without that, for the breed- 
ing female the Zoo has at present nests under 
the low-growing branches of a holly in the pen. 

In Zanzibar I have seen Muscovy Ducks with 
their broods going about the streets, and as there 
was m> water handy, they were evidently dis- 
pensing with a pond even in that tropical climate. 
Such a climate is, indeed, natural to these ducks, 
though they are so hardy here, for their real home 
is the hot parts of America, where they roost and 
nest in trees, which accounts for the surprising 
habit these lazy birds have of flying up and perch- 
ing on fences and roofs. This habit has, of 
course, to be borne in mind, when birds are newly 
introduced to a place or show a desire to* escape; 
but all that is needed is to clip the long quills of 
one wing, when the usual low fences used for 
ducks will keep them in. On the other hand, in 
situations where they are liable to attack by 
thieves, dogs or foxes, their powers of flight are 
very much in their favour, and it is astonishing 
to see what vigorous wing-power even the great 
heavy drake will display when 'his liberty is 
menaced. 

(To be continued.) 



48 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

THAT several mascots have been presented to 
the Zoological Society, London, lately, amongst 
which is "Jacko," the mascot of one of H.M. 
ships, but has now been pensioned off and put 
in the Zoo on account of the service he has 
seen. 

Originally saved from a banana boat which 
was torpedoed by the Germans, he was in the 
battles of Heligoland and the Dogger Bank. 
His troubles have made his temper uncertain. 
He wears an iron cross round his neck, on which 
are inscribed the names of his battles. 



THAT the following stock arrived on the "Ex- 
plorer" consigned to Mr. Westley T. Page : — 
1 Red Lory, 12 Ground Thrushes, 6 Barbets, 
4 Goldfinches, 1 Blue Jay, 3 Bulbubs, 60 
Finches. 



THAT no less than 5 Chimpanzees arrived dur- 
ing the last three weeks : — 1 in Liverpool, 4 
in London. Of the latter, 1 went to Copen- 
hagen, and 3 to New York. 



THAT about 30 Baboons and Monkeys arrived 
at alocal outport: They were in exceptionally 
fine condition. 



THAT a consignment of Australian Birds was re- 
ceived by a Midland Dealer, the first for some 
time. 



-@- 



THA1 the Lo .don arrivals have been practically 
nil. 5 Mongooses, 2 Rhesus, 3> Ring Parra- 
keets, 300' Canaries, 600 Shell Parrots, 22, Afri- 
can Birds. 



THAT the Performing Animals Defence Com- 
mittee held a meeting on Friday afternoon at 
Caxton Hall, London, when an appeal was made 
for the abolition of the practice of training wild 
animals for show purposes. Miss Douglas 
Hume said that as animals were bery like in- 
fants, their physical sufferings were more than 
those of adult human beings. It was one thing 
to develop tht understanding of a wild animal 
by scientific methods, but quite another to force 
it for show purposes. 



THAT there was a little excitement at the Zoo 
last week when the crocodiles keeper, Collins, 
who, when entering their tank, slipped and fell 



into the water. The noise of the splash roused 
the reptiles, which seemed to think food had 
been thrown in. Collins, however, escaped by 
vigorously beating them off with the stout pole 
which past experience had taught him to take 
into the tank. 



THAT "The World's Fair" gives the following 
description of the visit of the band of the Garde 
Republicaine : — 

"The band of the Garde Republicaine 
had a great time in London on Sunday after 
their enthusiastic reception at the Mansion 
House on Saturday. They visited Bucking- 
ham Palace, played to a vast audience in the 
Horse Guards Parade, visited the Zoo, and 
explored the Gardens at Kew. 

" But perhaps the greatest surprise of all 
turned up at the Zoo. 

" Going- from cage to cage the Frenchmen 
at' length reached the tortoise house, where 
they saw the giant tortoise with his head 
buried in the earth,. 

" 'Oh, la la,' they cried. Then there was 
a roar of laughter. One of the wags of the 
party cried 'Le tank,' and the joke went 
round until all the members of the band sent 
up the shout, 'Voila le tank.' " 



THAT further interesting information has been 
sent as regards the mammals in the trenches; 
needless to say the rodent order has asserted it- 
self. The ubiquity and iniquity of the rats, 
and, in a less degree, of the mice, are com- 
mon knowledge : some of the rats, indeed, have 
been of such exceptional size as almost to de- 
serve recognition as a trench "race." Field 
voles, too, in at least one locality, so swarmed 
in the trenches that they got killed by the men 
walking upon them. Hares appear to have 
been fairly plentiful; one observer records five 
having been killed by shrapnel — all of them 
within 500 yards of the front trench. In the 
"Zoologist" of last April, Captain Philip Gosse 
enumerates sixteen species of wild mammals, 
fourteen of which he himself caught close to 
the trenches. Six of these were insectivorous, 
nine were rodents, and one — the weasel — was 
a carnivore. But foxes have also been seen, 
and at least one polecat. 



THAT all my readers having any Norwich and 
Yorkshire Canaries, British Birds and Ferrets, 
Australian and Indian Birds, will kindly offer 
same to me without any delay. Lowest prices 
for prompt cash. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN. 

October 15th, 1916. 



Printed by W. J. Hasted & Son, (T.U.), 306 Mile End Road, London, E. 



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_A_ "VISIT IS IR/ESIFiECTiFTTIL.LTr REQUESTED 

"fiamlpn's menagerie magazine/' 

Vol. I. Nos. 1 to 12. Complete Series. Sent on receipt 

of 12/-, post paid. 
ONLY 90 SERIES AVAILABLE. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN, 221, St. George's Street, 

LONDON, EAST. 



TO LET. 



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 



List of Subscribers, for Vol. II., 1916 — 17. 

The Earl of Lonsdale, Lowther, Penrith. 

The Lord Rothschild, Museum, Tring. 

The Countess of Jersey, Middleton Park, Bices- 
ter. 

The Lady Julia FoUett, The Woodside, Old Wind- 
sor. 

The Hon. E. S. Montague, M.P., Bridge Street, 
Cambridge. 

Sir John Bland Sutton, 47, Brook Street, Gros- 
venor Square. 

Sir Edgar Boehm, Bentsbrooke, North Holm- 
wood, Surrey. 

Major Atherley, Croft Castle, Kingsland, Here 
fordshire. 

The Clifton Zoological Gardens, Bristol. 

The Royal Zoological Gardens, Dublin. 

Messrs, Jennison and Co. , Belle Vue, Manchester. 

The Director, Royal Zoological Society, Natura 
Artis Magistra, Amsterdam. 

The Superintendent, Zoological Gardens, Alipur, 
Calcutta, India. 

The Director, Zoological Gardens, Tokyo, Japan. 

Robt. D.. Carson, Zoological Gardens, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., U.S.A. 

Dr. Penrose, Zoological Gardens, Philadelphia, 
Pa., U.S.A. 

E. A. Le Souef, Zoological Gardens, Perth, Aus- 

tralia. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Copenhagen. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Rotterdam, 
Dr. F. D. Baker, National Zoological Park, 

Washington, D.C. 
Richard Arnold, Tower House, Leigham Court 

Road, Streatham. 
Lieut. Thomas Buchan, Hepburn, Haddington, 

East Lothian. 
Dr. M. Bernstein, 51, Cazenove Road, Stoke New- 

ington. 

F. E. Blaauw, Gooliust, St. Graveland, Hilver- 

sum, Holland. 



Boyers House, Westbury, 






Wm. Shore-Baily, 
Wilts. 

Dr. John K. Butter, M.D., Highfield House, Can- 
nock, Staffs. 

Mrs. Cotton, The Mount, Bishopstoke. 

W. Edmunds, Coombe Farm, Langton Matra- 
vers, Dorset. 

H. Earl, Newgate House, Cottingham, E. Yorks. 

Herbert A. French, St. Margaret's, Downs Park 
West, Bristol. 

Linwood Flint, Waterford, Maine, U.S.A. 

Miss Hall, 76, Adelaide Road, Hampstead, N.W. 

Miss Howman, 6, Essex Grove, Upper Norwood. 

Rev. Hemsworth, Monks Fryston, S. Milford. 

W. J. Henning, Hillside, New Maiden. 



T. Hebb, Brooklea, Downs Road, Luotn. 

W. A. Harding, Histon Manor, Cambridge. 

Homes Zoological Society, 318, Keith and Perry 
Buildings, Kansas City, U.S.A. 

Lieutenant T. Buchan-Hepburn, Letham, Had- 
dington, Scotland. 

H. Ide, Elm Lawn, Eden Street, Kingston-on- 
Thames. 

William Jamrach, 65, Lordship Lane, Stoke New- 
ington, N. 

Mrs. E. Jordan, Gorthie, Wokingham. 

Mrs. Johnstone, Burrswood, Groornbridge, Kent. 

Alderman J. D. Kiley, J. P., 33, Gun Street, 
Spitalfields. 

W. King, SB, High Street, Whitechapel. 

C. F. Leach, Vale Lodge, Leatherhead. 

P. L. Morgan, Westfield, Elgin, Scotland. 

Dan Mason, Maisonette, Broadstairs. 

John W. Marsden, Thornhurst, Tewit Park, Har- 
rogate. 

R. Scott-Miller, Greenoakhill, Broomhouse, Scot- 
land. 

Mrs. C. Prioleau, Loxwood House, Billinghurst. 

L. Pullar, Dunbarnie Cottage, Bridge of Earn. 

Monsieur Pichot, Boulevard Haussman, Paris. 

A. Reeve, Hall-by-the-Sea, Margate. 

Ernest W. Robinson, Liscombe, Leighton Buz- 
zard. 

Gerald Rattigan, Frou Selen Hall, Caersws, Mont- 
gomeryshire. ■ 

Warren Bruce Smith, Aubrey Lodge, Emsworth, 
Hants. 

G. de Southoff, Leysin, Vaud, Switzerland. 

Dr. W. O. Stillman, 287, State Street, Albany, 
N.Y., U.S.A. 

H. S. Spencer, 109, Barcombe Avenue, Streatham 
Hill. 

W. H. St. Quinton, Scampston Hall, Rillington, 
York. 

W. R. Temple, Ormonde, Datchet, Bucks. 

W. D. Trickett, Lench House, Waterfoot. 

A. Carr Walker, Tyrie, West Park, Leeds. 

W. Wightman, Estate Office, Aynhoe, Banbury. 

G. L. de Waru, Les Lilas, Leysin, Vaud, Swit- 
zerland. 

Walter Winans, Claridge's Hotel, Brook Street, 

W. 
Captain Woodward, Mayville, Kingston-by-Sea. 

Brighton. 
E. Wuiron, 7, Rue Theophile Gautier, Neuill>, 

pres Paris. 
Messrs. Willsons, 37, New Oxford Street, W. 
A. S. Yates, Bishops Sutton, Alrcsford, Hants. 

The Zoological Society of Scotland, Corstorphine, 
Murray field, Edinburgh. 



^ — & — 

Hamlyns 




DEC -5 1916 






Menagerie 
Magazine. 



! No. 7.- Vol. 2. NOVEMBER, 1916. Price One Shilling ! 



CONTENTS. 



NOTICE 49 

IMPORTANT NOTICE ... 49 

FEDERAL PROTECTION OF ALL MIGRATORY BIRDS IN NORTH AMERICA... 49 

A CITY'S STRANGE FIGHT TO SECURE A GREAT ZOO 50 

CONTINENTAL SQUIRRELS IN BRITAIN 52 

CHILDREN'S PETS EXHIBITION AT PANAMA-PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL 

EXPOSITION 52 

GREAT FAMINE IN CANARIES 54 

GENERAL NOTES 56 

c ■=■ 6 



Telegrams : Hamlyn, London Docks, London. 



Telephone : 6341 Avenue 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East. 



Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station 
Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence five minutes walk. 

P O.O. payable at Leman Street, East. Cheques crossed "London County &> Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 




TERMS NOTICE.— All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from me of leaving my establishment. 

Stock "once sold cannot°be taken back. TELEPHONE.— Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS.— Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIVERY.— Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

For the arrivals from abroad during the past month. Full Part cula 



The fifth consignment from Calcutta is due about the end of 

November. The following live stock is expected, 
1 female Elephant, 4 feet high. 
1 full-grown Bengal Tiger. 
1 half-grown Bengal Tiger. 
500 Rhesus Monkeys. 

100 Shamahs, | These will be the last birds I shall 

1 ,000 Parrakeets. ) receive for some times. 

Prices on application. 

South African Arrivals. 

The " Carlisle Castle" is due end of November with two 

female Zebras. 
I also receive later one thousand Birds, which will be the 

for some time to come. 



I 



Blue and White Foxes : 3 Blue, 2 Whites, all in first-class 

condition. each £10 

These are at present deposited with Messrs. Jennison, 
Belle Vue, Manchester, who will be pleased to shew them 
to intending purchasers. They will not be sold one penny 
less than £10 each. 

1 Norwegian Pine Marten ... £3 

In absolute perfect condition. Most interesting pet. 

15 Chaema Baboons, of various sizes, some very small, 

medium and large lot £150 

6 Californian Quail, 5 cocks, 1 hen lot £3 

Grey Squirrels. 

Arriving end November direct from New York. Prices on 
application. 



The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at The Zoologi- 
cal Society's Gardens, Regents Park, London : — 

1 Alligator, 6 feet each £8 

1 „ 5£feet £6 

3 Giant Toads (Bufo marinus) 15/2 

5 Small „ , „ 20/6 



2 Adorned Terrapins ... 

1 Gopher Tortoise ... 

1 Heloderm Lizard, poisonous ... ,, ( 

American Rattlesnakes, arriving unmutilated and of 
a good size. Prices on application, 



30/6 
40/6 



Canadian Black White Skunks (Mephitis mephitica). 

I am very pleased to report that all Skunks have been 
now sold. ' None have been sold for less than four pounds 
each. Those Amateurs who were waiting for a reduction in 
price have been grievously disappointed. Let me assure 
them all that when once a price is fixed I keep to it. I do 
not entertain offers. 



Ferrets. 

The largest buyer in Great Britain. 

I am prepared to pay cash for one thousand Ferrets at a 

moment's notice. 



Norwich and Yorkshire Canaries. 

Four thousand Can.iries bought in fourteen days for cash. 

I am prepared to purchase a thousand pairs of Canaries for 

cash immediately. 



British Birds. 

Wanted :— Goldfinches, Bullfinches, Skylarks, etc. State lowest 
prices. 



Apology. 

I wish to apologize for the stock offered for sale in this 
Magazine to-day. 

The arrivals are few and far between. 

All Animals and Birds arriving are practically sold to 
arrive here. 

I might state for the American market only. 



Hamlgns JEatagsrk JEagajira. 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 7.— Vol. 2. 



LONDON, NOVEMBER, 1916. 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 



Hamlin's ffltmQtx'u Jftaga^itu. 

Published on the 15th of each month. 



Editorial and Business Office (pro tem) : — 

221, ST. GEORGE'S STREET, LONDON, 
Telephone: Avenue 6341. 
Telegrams : " Hamlyn, London Docks, London." 



Advertisement Rates, very reasonable, on application. 

The Editor will be glad to receive for publication articles 
and all interesting photos, the imports and exports of all 
stock, and foreign adventures with all wild stock. 



NOTICE. 

The subscription for Vol. II., 1916 — 17, is 
10/-, post free. If your name is not in 
the list on back page, kindly post 10/- without 
any delay. All subscriptions commence with No. 
1 of Vol. 2. Yearly subscriptions only received. 
Specimen copies can be sent post free on receipt 
of twelve penny stamps. Subscribers not receiv- 
ing their Magazine should communicate at once 
with the Editor. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE. 

All Subscribers in Norway, Sweden, Den- 
mark, Spain, Portugal, Switzerland, Holland and 
United States, who have not received their usual 
numbers, are requested to communicate at once 
with the Editor. They will in future receive the 
Magazine through the Office of Messrs. W. H. 
Smith and Son, Strand, W.C. 

By arrangement with Messrs. W. H. Smith 
& Son, 186, Strand, W.C, "Hamlyn's Menagerie 
Magazine" is on sale on the 16th of each month 
at the following Railway Stations :■ — 

Charing Cross (South Eastern and Chatham 
Railway). 

King's Cross (Great Northern Railway). 

Liverpool Street (Great Eastern Railway). 

St. Pancras (Midland Railway). 

Victoria (South Eastern and Chatham Rail- 
way). 

Waterloo (South Western Railway). 



Federal Protection of all Migratory 
Birds in North America. 



Dr. W. T. Hornaday writes on September 
6th, 1916 : — 

" With record-breaking celerity the interna- 
tional treaty between Canada- and the United 
States tor the federal protection of all the migra- 
tory birds of North America, north of Mexico, 
has been ratified by Congress., and is now a law. 
It was initiated, over two years ago, by Senator 
George P. McLean of Connecticut, in a Senate 
resolution. At that time President Wilson wrote 
a letter to Secretary Bryan, approving the idea, 
and requesting its advancement. 

"After a great amount of labor in Canada, in 
which Dr. G. Gordon Hewitt, of the Canadian 
Department of Agriculture, played a very import- 
ant part, the treaty was finally sent down from 
Ottawa early in August, for ratifictaion by this 
country. On August 16, it was signed by Secre- 
tary Lansing and Sir Cecil Arthur Spring-Rice, 
British Ambassador. 

" By the President it was transmitted to the 
Senate on August 2Q<. It went to and through the 
Committee on Foreign Relations in a few hours; 
and Senator James A. O 'Gorman, fully resolved 
to secure action at this session, was designated to 
take charge of it on the floor of the Senate. For 
several months past Senator McLean has been hard 
at work paving a broad and smooth road for its 
passage. 

"On August 29 it was brought before the 
Senate, and quickly ratified by a two-thirds 
majority. The swiftness with which Congress did 
its part in the matter amazed and delighted the 
defenders of the birds. That quick action is the 
Senate's answer toi the very bitter and abusive 
attacks that have been made on the federal migra- 
tory bird law and its defenders by Senator James 
A. Reed of Missouri, and a few of his duck shoot- 
ing constituents who vehemently demand duck 
shooting in spring as a special privilege. 

"Once more the United States Senate has 
added to its fine and quite unbroken record in the 
enactment of sane and reasonable wild life pro- 



50 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



tection laws: The ratification of that treaty is tiie 
most important and far-reaching step in the protec- 
tion and increase of birds that ever yet has been 
taken, in any country ! It extends the strong arm 
of federal protection over about 1,022 species and 
sub-species of the most valuable and interesting 
birds of North America. 

"The news, of the event of August 29, will 
be read with thrills of pleasure by the millions of 
farmers, forest owners, bird lovers and sports- 
men who are interested in the increase and per- 
petuation of the birds of North America. 

"Except to Senator Reed, the people of the 
United States owe to the' President, the entire 
Senate, and above all to Senator McLean, a pro- 
found and lasting gratitude." 



A City's Strange Fight to secure a 
Great Zoo. 

By Felix J. Koch. 

Never, probably, in the history of Anglo- 
Saxon communities has there been a civic awak- 
ening, — a big "city movement," so to say, — just 
exactly like it ! Never have the people of an 
entire commonwealth, — and this a city with amuse- 
ments of ever other legitimate sort to substitute, 
if need be, — risen up and shown how dear to them 
the presence of a great aggregation of wild ani- 
mals in their midst,- — even though one must pay 
admission to view these, — even as you would a 
private circus or show here ! 

In Cincinnati, word had come that the good 
angel of the big zoological gardens, who has so 
long financed it through its seasons of financial 
failure, would do so no longer. The Zoo- was in 
debt, — heavily so at that, — and unless these debts 
were paid, and very quickly, Jack Roosa and the 
infinity of other creditors would foreclose; the 
animals would be sold to cities elsewhere; the 
grounds be divided into building lots; and the 
famous Cincinnati Zoo be sold. At first it was 
believed by the good people of Cincinnati that the 
whole affair was either a bit of "grand-standing" 
on the part of importuning creditors, to hurry pay- 
ments, then that behind it lay the desire of the 
present holders to have the city buy the Zoo; but 
when the matter had been threshed out by the 
newspapers to convince the most dubious, and the 
good folk of the Queen City became convinced 
that they might really lose one of the city's banner 
attractions, Cincinnati rose, en masse, to a huge 
"Save the Zoo" meet, and the Zoo was saved, 
for the time at least. 



"Save the Zoo" Week in Cincinnati will go 
down in the history of the love of man for the wild 
things as one of the most notable demonstrations 
the world has yet seen to such end. In the home 
of rich man and the hovel of poor man one heard 
just the one slogan of "SAVE THE ZOO!" 
The school children came home from the schools 
— public, parochial and private — full of it, for 
there was to be a "day" of their own at the gar- 
dens when their mites of reduced admission would 
go to save the Zoo. The mothers were full of it, 
for the women's clubs had risen, as one to approve 
of it, and for Madam Jack Roosa not to be seen 
at the Zoo upon Ladies' Day of the "Save the 
Zoo Week" would be as much a social faux pas 
as to omit the opera, or not attend the symphony 
each winter's meet. The men, in their clubs, their 
fraternal orders, were filled with it; each order 
resolved that it should make better showing than 
all the rest come "Fraternal Day," and mean- 
while certain bodies, like the Musicians', entered 
the breach to supply such attractions that not to 
attend the Zoo on the day reserved for them was 
simply to cheat oneself of a treat 

"Save the Zoo," to repeat, was the slogan all 
about Cincinnati, as few slogans have been car- 
ried before. 

"Save the Zoo" became the matter of the 
best-natured rivalry Cincinnati's varied organ- 
izations have undergone in ever so long. The 
first day of the Week was known as Masonic Day, 
and it was up to the Masons to furnish the crowds. 
The second was Chamber of Commerce, Business 
Men's Club, Advertiser's Club and Rotarian's 
Day, and they filled the grounds rest assured. 
Follow on these, then, Ladies' Day, and Ladies' 
Day, Manager Whitlock tells us, was the largest 
in attendance out there by far — twice as many 
people as any one other day — over five thousand 
paid admissions in all When it is recalled that, 
at like time of year 200' paid admissions make a 
very good day's showing, it can be seen what 
" Save the Zoo Week" meant. The mothers hav- 
ing come, seen, been delighted, the day after was 
Children's Day, and then, indeed, the crowds 
fairly packed the grounds. Children were ad- 
mitted that day at five cents apiece, and conser- 
vative estimates say there were 10,000 children at 
least on the grounds. 

Thursday was Business Organizations' Day 
— local business organizations, like the "Vine 
Street," the "Sixth Street," and so on. Fridav 
was Protestant Day — in the hands of the Federa- 
tion of Churches. Saturday was Fraternal Day; 
and on Sunday, Musicians' Day, the local Federa- 
tion of Musicians donated four bands — 125 pieces 
—and though it came on to rain in the evening 
just when the concert crowds would leave their 
homes to attend, the attendance was second larg- 
est of all. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



51 



"Save the Zoo Week" was extended to in- 
clude one day of the week following when Catholic 
Day was observed here, and when results came 
to be counted it was found that, instead of facing 
bankruptcy the next morning, the paid admissions 
of sixty thousand people were safely in hand ! 

The Zoo had been "saved" for a year at any 
rate, and thanks to this saving of the gardens, 
they have been thrust into the limelight so that, 
at the moment, three great motion picture pro- 
ducers are bidding for the right to operate them, 
subject to approval of a commission of citizens as 
heretofore, and pay well for the right of using, in 
their pictures, the varied animals and attractive 
grounds. 

Where, for it appears evident, throughout 
Cincinnati, that "Save the Zoo Week" has saved 
the Zoo for seeming all time ! 

The great public demonstration for saving 
the Zoo here, as narrated, is the more remarkable 
in the face of the fact that the Zoo- has never 
been, and is not now, a free public ground. 

While the popular version has long been that 
the fraction company of Cincinnati controls the 
Zoo there, the facts show otherwise. Back about 
the year 1901, when the motor took folk away 
from the city for pastime and new summer resorts, 
opened close by, diverted the crowds from the 
Zoo, things went from bad to worse, financially, 
with the gardens; creditors pressed, as they did 
now, and the Zoo was put up for auction and 
sale. The first of these auctions brough not a 
single bidder for the property, and the only al- 
ternative was to sell the animals, piecemeal, to 
whoever would buy them, and divide the grounds 
into building lots. Finally a company stepped in, 
in nick of time, to prevent that, and offered an 
amount sufficient to purchase the Zoo' and satisfy 
every creditor. Just what would occur next no- 
body quite knew. 

It was at that critical juncture, as luck would 
have it, that the present head of Cincinnati's 
street-railway system came to the Queen City as 
head of the roads. People were predicting he had 
come to take their cash home with him. He 
declared he had come here to stay ! To prove 
this, and show he was interested in the city of his 
new adoption, he bought the capital-stock of the 
new Zoo Company, and declared that he would 
now run the Zoo, though he would not spend 
on it more than he had put in. In order to give 
the city a share in the operation of the gardens, 
which meant so much to it, he then divided this 
new purchased stock among fifteen directors, 
presenting each of them with his block as gift. 
No revenue would accrue from this stock, how- 
ever; all proceeds of the Zoo, over expenses, were 
to go to improving the park; the directors in the 



non-profit-sharing corporation, further, could not 
sell the stock; it was made non-saleable; but the 
purpose of their holding it was simply to give 
them legal right to take actual interest in the 
place. 

These directors, representative citizens all of 
them, were then bidden to run the Zoo, as they 
cared to, only they must not come to the traction 
magnate for more funds to such ends. 

The Zoo at once began to pay; it not only 
"made" its expenses, but there was a little over 
beside; and things began to look prosperous here. 
The Zoo arranged to' put up> one of the finest 
Herbivora buildings in the world, a concrete struc- 
ture, costing $55,000 in all, and this took up not 
alone all the $40',000' of savings accumulated so 
for, but a balance, loaned by the traction com- 
pany, through the "goodl angel" of the Zoo so 
long — Mr. Shoepf, its supreme head. 

Then the unexpected happened. That same 
year came the panic and people's funds ran very 
low. That year the railways cut out the long 
popular "Sunday excursions" to the Queen City, 
which had been thronging the grounds. That 
year the cheap automobile put in its appearance, 
and took folk from the city; that year other 
resorts, with the advantage of newness to draw 
them, took the crowds. The Zoo began losing 
money, and the rival attractions aforesaid have 
been operating against it ever since. 

Year after year, instead of "breaking even," 
let alone paying its loan from the traction com- 
pany, the Zoo has had to borrow more and still 
more money from this, until the interest far and 
away outweighed the revenues in feres paid in 
that the company would not have had spent with it 
by folk going elsewhere if the Zoo did not exist. 
Finally the Zoo had come to owe rhe traction 
company a round $135,000', and the latter believed 
it should call ajialt. What, is more, the traction 
company hasn't the funds to loan any longer, for 
the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio is order- 
ing all such concerns as that to limit themselves 
to the specific purposes their title has in mind, 
and running a Zoo is hardly a part of a city's 
carrying trade. 

Now, therefore, that the traction company's 
aid is gone, the "angel's" patience exhausted, the 
Zoo seemed to be at its end. 

"Save the Zoo Week," however, came in 
season to save it. 

It saved it, and, in turn, it threw it into, the 
lime-light; until now, far from being the pawn of 
a sheriff for auction, its directors are able to 
demand their own terms. 

The 60 acres of wonderland are saved to the 
city — the finest giraffes in captivity — the last three 



52 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Carolina parrakeets in the world—the famous 
bison — the other wild things are to stay — and 
Cincinnati keeps her Zoo for indefinite time. 



CONTINENTAL SQUIRRELS IN 
BRITAIN. 

By Frederick J. Stubbs. 

A note on the increase of the squirrel in Brit- 
ain may hold a little interest for those concerned 
in the handling of wild animals. During recent 
years the squirrel has decreased in a remarkable 
way in several counties where formerly the crea- 
ture was abundant, but so far no explanation is 
forthcoming. In Essex, particularly, this diminu- 
tion has been noticed; but, latterly, the animal 
seems to be increasing in the neighbourhood of 
Epping Forest. In January of the present year, 
near Epping, a squirrel was killed by a boy and 
shown to me the same day. This mammal is 
probably, so far as colour is concerned, the most 
variable in the world. The seasonal changes in 
the pelage of our own species are very compli- 
cated, but the tail is never, I believe, either black 
or red. The Epping specimen had the tail prac- 
tically black, the body a dull and very dark brown. 
Certainly it was not our own Sciurus v. leucourus', 
and I hazarded the guess that the specimen be- 
longed to C. v. fuscoater, a native of Central 
Europe. 

Unfortunately, it was inadvertently destroyed 
while in the hands of a local taxidermist, and its 
actual identity could not be settled. In August 1 of 
this year, in Epping Forest, I had a good view 
of a squirrel, and particularly noted its black tail. 
At that season, the tail of the British squirrel is 
invariably light — indeed, in some cases appearing 
quite white, and frequently cream colour. On 
Sunday last (October 15th), in the same locality, 
we saw another squirrel, and this also was strik- 
ingly dark, with a blackish tail. Several of my 
friends here have observed this increase of squir- 
rels, and all have remarked the unusually dark 
tints of the animals. 

Two or three years ago I remember seeing a 
squirrel which had been caught somewhere near 
London (I cannot at the moment remember exactly 
where), which had a reddish tail similar in colour 
to the fur of the back. This one, perhaps, was 
of Dutch or Scandinavian origin. There is no 
doubt whatever in my mind that these increasing 
Essex squirrels are not native, but descendants 
of the imported animals that have recently been 
turned loose in England. I am informed that a 
gentleman in Epping set free a number some years 
ago, and I know that Mr. Hamlyn has imported 
squirrels from several Continental countries, es- 
pecially (as he informs me) from Italy and South- 
eastern Europe. 



The interesting point is this. Our own squir- 
rel, for some mysterious reason, has died out, or 
is dying out, in Essex, Somerset, Oxford, Staf- 
ford, Lancashire and Yorkshire. But, in Essex 
at least, it is again increasing, and apparently 
from an introduced stock. These Continental sub- 
species are so much like our' own that they cannot 
be distinguished without difficulty. The reader, 
however, if ever he has the chance, should com- 
pare recently-captured animals with stuffed speci- 
mens killed in past years, and if the recent squirrel 
happens to be Continental, he will soon detect the 
difference. 

The charming "fairy in furs," the American 
grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis), is rapidly in- 
creasing as a wild British species; but I have not 
seen it in Essex, and have heard of but a single 
occurrence in Epping Forest. It appears to have 
been turned out originally in Bushey Park in 1889, 
and afterwards it was introduced at Woburn Park. 
At the latter place they increased so rapidly that 
thinning out became necessary, and 1,000 were 
killed in a single winter. This species is now 
common in Scotland, North Yorkshire, Bucks, 
Bedfordshire, Hampstead Heath, Regent's Park 
and Richmond Park. 

Personally, I would prefer to see the brown 
squirrel ratlher than the grey as an ornament to 
British woodlands; and it is pleasant to think that 
this infusion of Continental blood promises to re- 
stock the places from which the native species 
has so strangely disappeared during the past 
generation or so. 



P.S. — Since writing the above I have been shown 
a stuffed specimen of a squirrel shot in a gar- 
den at Theydon Bois, on the borders of Epping 
Forest, about February of the present year. It 
closely resembles the red phase of our British 
squirrel so far as the body is concerned, but the 
tail is rich chestnut red, distinctly brighter than 
the tint of the body. Assuredly it cannot be 
our native race, and I think that if it were com- 
pared with Continental specimens it would prove 
to be Sciurus vulgaris fuscoater in the winter 
pelage of its light phase. It should be added 
that in most of these races, apart from season- 
able changes, there is a dark phase and a light 
phase, Apparently we have both phases of this 
Continental squirrel now wild in Essex. — F.J.S. 



Children's Pets Exhibition at Panama- 
Pacific International Exposition. 

By Frederick W. D 'Evelyn, 
Secretary, Children's Pets Exhibition, 

Association of America. 
It may seem a far cry from a Pets Show to a 
Menagerie. After all, is not the relationship com- 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



53 



pigmentary — that of youth to matuity, harmonized 
by a bond in common, the love for " living things" ? 

A show exclusively for children's pets, with 
an age limit of 16 years for the exhibitors; with 
entries officially benched, classified, catalogued, 
and judged with all the details of a Crystal Palace 
or a Madison Square has proved such a wonder- 
fully "good thing" that for several years such 
shows have been held in San Francisco and the 
adjoining cities around San Francisco Bay. More 
recently these shows have been held in several of 
the larger cities and leading school centres 
throughout the United States. 

San Francisco, as the birth-place of the move- 
ment, confirmed its claim during the recent 
Panama-Pacific International Exposition by a 
double event, a Children's Pets Exhibition and a 
Children's Pets Exhibition Congress. Both of 
these celebrations were absolutely the first of their 
kind ever presented at a world-wide eqposition. 
As such they attracted much attention and re- 
ceived eqtensive recognition. 

The pets show was benched in one of the 
largest buildings upon the grounds. The entry 
of some 1,400 pets constituted a veritable Noah's 
Ark, novel, varied, and original : from Cardinals 
to caterpillars; horned toads to bear cubs; walla- 
bs to waltzing mice; Orandas to water dogs; and 
so on ad infinitum — things that swim and things 
that fly and things that crawl. The "tame" ex- 
hibits included dogs, cats, rabbits, pigeons, sheep, 
goats, ponies, chicken, water fowl, cage birds, 
growing plants; nature studied, woodlore, and 
"allied fixins'." These classes were filled to the 
limit. To the casual observer it truly was a mot- 
ley gathering of things, but the initiated realized 
that each entry was to' its youthful owner his pet, 
about which for many preceding days had he not 
seen visions ! To him it was a real movie which 
passed as a fitful panorama ever and anon before 
his expectant ambition : the big show at the big 
fair. The super-awesome judge; the coop num- 
ber; the ribbons; the medals; the pass cards with 
His Name printed on them : then, the other kids 
a-watchin' — surely it was the time of his life. 

We must concede that by opening day the 
enthusiasm of the young folks had become conta- 
gious from the President in the Service Building 
to the keeper of the gate; from his Honour, the 
Mayor, to the Chief of Police. Merchants, teach- 
ers, citizens, visitors, had "got the fever." The 
newspapers and associated press gave their head 
lines and space galore; special trains ran into the 
city; extra ferry boats, freighted with parents, 
patrons, and kids, changed the schedules and ran 
direct to the exhibition grounds. Then the big 
gates swang open and the great siren sounded its 
welcome, it was "hands up" all round : the Child- 
ren's Pets had won the day and owned the entire 
outfit. 



From the moment of the opening to the sound- 
ing of the final bell at 10'. 30 p.m. on the second 
day the show hall was crowded wit'h an astonished 
and appreciative throng, whose spontaneous 
opinions found ready voice in quaint utterance; 
e.g., "It was a real revelation"; "Could not have 
thought it possible"; "Aint this great"; "We'll 
have this in our town." Such ready estimates 
were indeed glad tidings to the hard-worked Exe- 
cutive Committee. However, the full measure of 
the success of the show was probably reached a 
few days later when the Exposition Department 
officially recorded : "No feature of the great Ex- 
position proved more attractive or brought more 
people through the gates. . . . The Exhibition 
was very much worth while, no less from an Ex- 
position view-point than from the lessons of 
humanity which it taught." 

The Congress was equally successful, — a two 
hours session in the great Administration Build- 
ing — the first of its kind ever held, and, by a happy 
coincidence, the final congress of the wonderful 
series of 933 held during the Exposition year. The 
program was varied. There were addresses by 
experts on nature study, pets, and wild life while 
papers from " grown up" former exhibitors recalled 
memories of pets days and bore witness that "the 
love, ambitions, and lessons of those dear, dear 
days" were still living factors, bearing fruit in the 
larger and more urgent claims of maturer years. 

The Panama-Pacific International Exposition 
presented to the Committee a large bronze medal- 
lion, suitably engraved and bearing the children's 
slogan : " A child without a pet is like a flower 
without the sunshine." As a result of the con- 
gress a permanent organization was formed, the 
Children's Pets Exhibitions Association of Ameri- 
ca, with directors in New Fork, Chicago,. Boston 
and San Francisco. 

Only those who have followed the pets move- 
ment can appreciate its scope and its significance. 
Potent, dominant, clamorous are it's claims. Its 
fields are broad and desirable, for are not its 
attributes ethical, humanitarian, educational, 
economic? 

As we write news comes from Sydney in res- 
ponse to our promptings. "A big committee is 
working on the Children's Pets Exhibition. 
Lady Helen Munro Ferguson, wife of the Governor 
General, says it would be a splendid way of adding 
to the war funds." A few more seasons and the 
movement will be world wide. We see a won- 
drous field for its activities in the dear old home- 
land, when the men of might and the men of 
right have won back for it the good old days 
when the boys and girls could play upon the streets 
and in the fields and the commons, none daring 
to make them afraid. And these days shall come. 



54 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



GREAT FAMINE IN CANARIES. 



STARTLING DANGER TO THE CANARY 
INDUSTRY OF GREAT BRITAIN. 



MORE CANARIES MUST BE BRED IN 
THOUSANDS. 



MAGNIFICENT OPENING 
FOR ENTERPRISING BREEDERS 



From "Cage Birds," 21st October. 



There is a famine — an appalling shortage in 
the Canary market. Less Canaries are being 
bred. The demand for Canaries was never 
greater. Is the Canary industry of Great Britain 
to hold its own, or must it be replaced by the efforts 
of other, countries? For the last two years the 
drain on our resources in Canaries has been tre- 
mendous. Dealers have advertised right and left 
for stock. Millions of birds have left our shores, 
and the damage to the trade has been tremendous. 
Are you breeding Canaries? If not, start at: once. 
There is money in it. Big money. The demand 
for birds will be this year bigger than ever. Prices 
will be higher. We shall soon see the time when 
even ordinary songsters will fetch a guinea a 
head. Thousands of birds will change hands this 
next season for fifteen shillings a piece. The Can- 
ary breeders of Great Britain must grasp their 
opportunity. The time is now. They must con- 
serve the breeding stock, not imperil their future 
supply by parting with their own birds. The 
British bred Canary must replace all those hither- 
to supplied by Germany. It is a patriotic duty to 
grow Canaries, not merely by the score, but by 
the thousand. We want Canary farms, not Can- 
ary attics. It is the duty of breeders also to insist 
that birds they sell are not sent out of the country. 
It is true such birds bring in American dollars to 
the dealer, and that sometimes these dollars come 
from German-Americans of the hyphenated! order. 
But by selling their birds abroad in such large 
quantities they are putting in the hands of foreign 
competitors the means of supplying the enormous 
demand that has arisen abroad as well as at home. 
British bred Canaries for British people, that must 
be the cry for after the war,. The British Canary 
is the best and healthiest and brightest in the 
world. When next spring comes along, with so 
many convalescent wounded soldiers about, the 
demand for songsters, gay and musical little crea- 
tures, will very far exceed the supply. So breeders 
be wise in time. "Cage Birds" will help> you. It 
will give you free advice. It will put you in touch 
with other breeders. The future of Canary breed- 
ing in Britain will be a wonderful one. See that 
you take your part in making it so, and you will 
reap a rich reward, in profit to your pocket, and 
pleasure to your mind. 

THE EDITOR. 



The above article is of national importance. 
Hand it on to someone who can breed Canaries 
and isn't! doing so at the present time. It is your 
duty to do so*, and to see that others in their turn 
pass the word on again. Let the good work go 
on. Breed more and more Canaries, and keep 
the home fires burning-. , 



"Cage Birds," October 28th:— 

THE FAMINE IN CANARIES. 



THE TRADE IS DEAD, PRO TEM. 

Sir, 

I am rather surprised at your note, "Great 
Famine in Canaries." 

Long before "Cage Birds" was ever thought 
of. the American dealers were buying yearly im- 
mense quantities of Norwich and Porkshires, with 
others. 

Forty years ago I remember the Americans 
visiting London twice yearly to pick up their 
consignments from Norwich and Bradford. They 
have continued to do so down to the present time. 
Genuine American dealers. The English breeders 
have greatly benefited by the many thousands of 
pounds spent by these American dealers. 

Without their custom the Canary trade would 
be absolutely nil. Then why advise the breeders 
to- spoil themselves? Advise them to breed every 
possible Canary for exportation, to supply the 
world as usual. I state without fear of contra- 
diction that there is no trade at home here for 
Canaries, or even foreign birds of any sort. The 
birds trade is dead pro tern, in Great Britain. 
There only remains the old export trade. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



AN INTERVIEW WITH A NORWICH 
BREEDER. 

To get at the bottom of the facts relating to 
the supply of and demand for English Canaries, 
we have had an interview with Mr. Arthur 
Howard, of Howard and Son, London and Nor- 
wich, breeders, exhibitors, and dealers in Nor- 
wich Canaries especially. 

Mr. Howard agrees that the demand for the 
past two years has exceeded the supply, but he 
says this is putting the case mildly. The demand, 
he told us, has always exceeded the supply, not 
only during the past two years, but for all the 
years his father and he have known anything about 
the trade. The demand is practically illimitable. 
All that is necessary is to breed the young birds. 
They will all be wanted, and more; more will be 
wanted than can possibly be produced. 

Before the war, Mr. Howard told us, more 
birds went to Germany annually than to any other 
country in the world. One German buyer nlone 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



55 



would buy a thousand pairs from each of four or 
five Norwich dealers, who themselves collected 
the birds from the breeders. 

But the home trade alone in English Canaries 
has always been greater than that with America 
and Germany combined, notwithstanding the fact 
that the birds taken out of our country by the 
German agents were replaced to some extent by 
German-bred singing Canaries. 

Now that the German supply to our markets 
has been definitely stopped, the future for the 
English Canary breeder is rosy in the extreme. 
The opportunity is before him, and it only requires 
grasping. Breed the birds, don't trouble about 
the selling of them, says Mr. Howard, they will 
sell themselves- 

It should not be forgotten that the English 
birds which in pre-war times went to Germany in 
thousands were not for Germany itself. The Ger- 
man agents were only middlemen between the 
English breeder and purchasers all over the world. 
The world's demand will now come to England 
direct, and if the English breeder is not prepared 
to meet it it will be his own loss. 



"Cage Birds," November 4th : — 

THE FAMINE IN CANARIES. 



IS THE HOME TRADE "DEAD PRO TEM."? 

The statement made in a letter in our issue 
of Oct. 28 that the home trade in Canaries is dead 
has provoked a hail of letters. We have com- 
munications from breeders, dealers, private buy- 
ers, and all kinds of people to the effect that the 
home trade is a long way from being dead. There 
are not enough Canaries to meet the demand; that 
is all, and the lesson is obvious. Breed more 
Canaries. They will sell themselves. 

A question has been raised whether breeding 
from one pair of Canaries can be made to pay. 
Of course it 1 can. We know of a lady who bought 
a pair of cheap Canaries last year, and the produce 
realised five times the cost of the original pair. 
And she still has the old ones and one pair of their 
young to pair up to the parent's for next year's 
breeding. 

It is within the power of thousands upon 
thousands of people to put up a few pairs of 
Canaries for breeding. The methods are simple 
and easily learned. If a hobby is to be taken up 
successfully some thought must be given to the 
best way of proceeding, and the hobby of breed- 
ing Canaries is not any exception to this rule. But 
there are no* difficulties so great as to deter any- 
one of ordinary intelligence. 

Some of our most successful breeders of to- 
day began not so many years ago in a small way, 
and now their names are as household words. 
People who began Canary breeding entirely as a 
pleosurable hobby found it a profitable one, and it 
is open to anyone to follow their example. 



The statements of a few of our readers that 
they can only get ridiculous prices for their Can- 
aries only show that in Canary selling, as in every- 
thing else, there are more ways than one of man- 
aging. We know that fair prices are obtainable. 
Over 4,000 Canaries left London this week in one 
lot, bound for New York. Itjs true that many of 
these were Rollers of Continental origin, merely 
passing through the hands of the dealer as part of 
the consignment, but the bulk were English Can- 
aries,, Norwich, Yorkshires, Borders and Lizards, 
and if 10,000 birds had been obtainable they would 
have found as ready a market as the 4,000. 

But why should these birds go out of our 
country at all ? They should be kept here for the 
benefit of Englishmen, not sent to America for the 
profit of American dealers, hyphenated or other- 
wise. Next year the demand will be greater. 
Shall we have the birds ? Anyway, if we have the 
birds we shall be able to sell them, and if we do 
not produce them the lass will be our own. 

Several letters received this week contain 
long details alleging unfair treatment to breeders 
on the part of dealers. These are in the nature of 
complaints, which would have been investigated 
at the time if they had been sent us in accordance 
with our rule, and it would not advance the argu- 
ment to publish statements which may or may 
not have proper foundation. Our deposit system 
exists to safeguard both parties in a deal, and those 
who do not take advantage of that system, but 
prefer to send goods or money on the bare state- 
ment of a stranger, have only themselves to blame 
if the transaction does not end tb their satisfac- 
tion. There are plenty of dealers advertising in 
our columns whose methods of business are en- 
tirely above suspicion, and it should be quite an 
eas matter fyo rthose who have stock for sale to 
discover dealers who will treat them honestly. 

One correspondent, after say'ng that the most 
he ever got from dealers for his surplus stock was 
seven shillings and sixpence a pair, goes on to 
tell a story of some one who broke a window in 
his house and stole ten valuable Canaries. He 
says he has his suspicions, but what the incident 
has to do with the market price of Canaries, we 
quite fail to see. The thief got ten Canaries for 
nothing. 



HOME TRADE STILL BOOMING. 

Sir, 

Mr. Hamlyn states "without fear of contra- 
diction" that there is no home trade in Canaries. 
What does Mr. Hamlyn know of the home trade 
of Canaries? How long has he been in the Canary 
trade? Anyway, he is contradicting his own 
statements, for a few months ago he was booming 
in your valuable columns how many thousands of 
Canaries he had sold in this country in a stated 
time. Now that the authorities have stopped the 
importation of birds, he states that the trade is 



56 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



dead pro tern. This we can contradict on good 
grounds. There is plenty of home trade, just as 
much as, and, in fact, more than, in previous 
years; people right and left are launching out into 
the bird fancy that could not afford to before. Let- 
ters are arriving in galore by every post, asking 
for birds, requisites, cages, etc. We are buying 
a thousand birds a week; we don't eat them. Sec- 
retaries of shows are having good sales, almost as 
good asi ever. It is true the Americans buy a few 
birds from this country; in normal times that 
trade was over the last week in December for the 
season, but just at present there is a little more 
demand on account of shortage of other birds. 
Once again let us tell friend Hamlyn, and in a 
friendly spirit, there still remains tihe old home 
trade, with a little new export trade. 

J. HOWARD AND SONS. 



Advertisement in "Cage Birds," November 4th :- 
CANARIES. 



Wanted to purchase ! Wanted to purchase ! 
Wanted to purchase ! ! ! 



Norwich and Yorkshire Canaries. 

Norwich and Yorkshire Canaries. 

Norwich and Yorkshire Canaries. 



5, 10, 50, 100, or 1,000 pairs. 



It will interest the Canary Fanciers to know 
that 4,2l20 British Canaries were shipped on the 
steamer "Manchuria" for New York, October 31, 
1916, 

These 4,2120 birds were purchased between 
October 26 and October 28. 

It constitutes a record purchase so far as the 
British Trade is concerned during the last twenty 
years. Every sender was paid cash. Only thir- 
teen cocks, one hen, arrived dead, and half cost 
was paid, although they were suffocated through 
bad packing. 

The value of the consignment was ,£31,000' 
(three thousand pounds). 

I require 5 , 000 1 Canaries this coming week, 
for which cash will be paid. 



J. Hamlyn, 221, St. George's Street, London, E. 

All the above proves very interesting reading, 
and seems to point out that the Canary Trade of 
Great Britain is vested in "Cage Birds" and J. 
Howard and Sons. If Mr. Howard will read my 
letter carefully he will see that I have stated that 
at the present time, that is, in September, Octo- 
ber and November, 1916i, there is no trade for 
Canaries in Great Britain amongst private buyers. 
It would be buite impossible to find a thousand 
private buyecs for Canaries at the present time. 

This is proved by the fact that nearly 
every Canary dealer has been forwarding 



their Canaries to me for sale; if they 
could find private buyers at a private price would 
they sell to Mr. Hamlyn at a dealer's price? Cer- 
tainly not. Bear in mind that I hold all cheques 
which have been paid away to every dealer. 
Cheques shewing payments amounting to 
over one thousand pounds are open for the 
inspection of anyone choosing to call and 
see them. I have been only three years collecting 
Canaries for an American Agency, and in that 
short time have handled more Canaries than Mr. 
Howard has during his eventful life. It is quite 
true that last year there was a wonderful sale for 
Canaries amongst private buyers, a truly remark- 
able sale. 

But times have changed, and very few birds 
now change hands privately. Mr. Howard is not 
selling a thousand birds weekly, and I question 
whether ^ he has had a thousand altogether this 
season. He knows quite well that I know the 
number he has received. 

And now for "Cage Birds." Mr. Fulljames 
a gentleman who is known throughout the Bird 
World, paid us a visit to inspect the wonderful 
consignment leaving for America. I am sorry 
that in "Cage Birds," November 4th, he makes 
the following statement as regards some of 
the birds seen here. I take great exception to the 
following : — 

"It is true that many of these were Rollers of 
"Continental origin, merely passing through the 
"hands of the dealer, as part of the consign- 
ment." 
No birds were sent to New York only those that 
I iactually bought and paid for, and so far as I 
know, none were of "Continental origin." We 
have never paid such a price as seven shillings and 
sixpence a pair. We have had no dispute with 
any sender, and no delay made in payments. 

In conclusion, I should like to state that Mr. 
Fulljames was astonished at the number, the 
varieties, the condition, and the general appear- 
ance of the four thousand odd birds. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN. 
P.S. — A copy of this Magazine has been sent to 
every Canary Dealer, Breeder and Amateur in 
Great Britain. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

THAT the "City of Edinburgh" arrived on Oct. 
2l9th with the following : — 1 Bengal Tiger, three 
parts grown; 1 Bengal Tiger, about nine 
months old!, being one of the smallest, tamest 
cubs ever seen; it was on collar and chain. 150 
Rhesus Monkeys, 1 Cassowary, 6 Sarus Cranes, 
3 Ducks, 350 Parrakeets, 1,200 small Birds. On 
the same steamer Mr. David Ezra, of Calcutta, 
sent a Midland Dealer 60 Parrakeets; 100 1 were 
shipped. Such a consignment; — 60' ordinary 
Parrakeets — will not prove a paying speculation. 



Printed by W. J. Hasted & Son, (T.U.), 306 Mile End Road, London, E. 



WILLSON'S LIVE STOCK PROVIDERS, Ltd., 

37, New Oxford Street, London, W.C. 

Telephone— Qerrard, 7708. Telegrams— Highbred Westcent, London. Bankers— London County & Westminster 

LONDON'S CHIEF EMPORIUM FOR DOGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



All our adult dogs are sold on 14 days' trial on condition that if not liked they will be 
exchanged for livestock to value from our stock within this period. 

All our Dogs are daily inspected by a Qualified Veterinary Surgeon. 



-A. "VISIT IS BESPZOTPTJLLT IRJEQXTIESTEID.. 

"fiamlpiTs menagerie magazine/' 

Vol. I. Nos. 1 to 12. Complete Series. Sent on receipt 

of 12/-, post paid. 
ONLY 90 SERIES AVAILABLE. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN, 221, St. George's Street, 

LONDON, EAST. 



TO LET. 



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 



List of Subscribers, for Vol. II., 1916—17. 

The Earl of Lonsdale, Lowther, Penrith. 

The Lord Rothschild, Museum, Tring. 

The Countess of Jersey, Middleton Park, Bices- 
ter. 

The Lady Julia Follett, The Woodside, Old Wind- 
sor. 

The Hon. E. S. Montague, M.P., Bridge Street, 
Cambridge. 

Sir John Bland Sutton, 47, Brook Street, Gros- 
venor Square. 

Sir Edgar Boehm, Bentsbrooke, North Holm- 
wood, Siirrey. 

Major Atherley, Croft Castle, Kingsland, Here 
fordshire. 

The Clifton Zoological Gardens, Bristol. 

The Royal Zoological Gardens, Dublin. 

Messrs. Jennison and Co. , Belle Vue, Manchester. 

The Director, Royal Zoological Society, Natura 
Artis Magistra, Amsterdam. 

The Superintendent, Zoological Gardens, Alipur, 
Calcutta, India. 

The Director, Zoological Gardens, Tokyo, Japan. 

Robt. D. Carson, Zoological Gardens, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., U.S.A. 

Dr. Penrose, Zoological Gardens, Philadelphia, 
Pa., U.S.A. 

E. A. Le Souef, Zoological Gardens, Perth, Aus- 

tralia. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Copenhagen. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Rotterdam. 
Dr. F. D. Baker, National Zoological Park, 

Washington, D.C. 
Richard Arnold, Tower House, Leigham Court 

Road, Streatham. 
Lieut. Thomas Buchan, Hepburn, Haddington, 

East Lothian. 
Dr. M.Burnshaw, 51, Cazenove Road, Stoke New- 

ington. 

F. E. Blaauw, Gooliust, St. Graveland, Hilver- 

sum, Holland. 

Wm. Shore-Baily, Boyers House, Westbury, 
Wilts. 

Dr. John K. Butter, M.D., Highfield House, Can- 
nock, Staffs. 

G. Chapman, High Street, Birmingham. 
Mrs. Cotton, The Mount, Bishopstoke. 
F. W. D'Evelyn, San Francisco. 

W. Edmunds, Coombe Farm, Langton Matra- 

vers, Dorset. 
H. Earl, Newgate House, Cottingham, E. Yorks. 
David Ezra, Kydd Stre,t, Calcutta. 
Guy Falkner, Belton, Uppingham. 
Herbert A. French, St. Margaret's, Downs Park 

West, Bristol. 
Lin wood Flint, Waterford, Maine, U.S.A. 
R. Gilpin, Zoological Gardens, Washington, U.S. 
Miss Hall, 76, Adelaide Road, Hampstead, N.W. 
Y. E. Harper, Calcutta. 



Miss Howman, 6, Essex Grove, Upper Norwood. 

Rev. Hemsworth, Monks Fryston, S. Milford. 

W. J. Henning, Hillside, New Maiden. 

T. Hebb, Brooklea, Downs Road, Luotn. 

W. A. Harding, Histon Manor, Cambridge. 

Homes Zoological Society, 318, Keith and Perry 
Buildings, Kansas City, U.S.A. 

Lieutenant T. Buchan-Hepburn, Letham, Had- 
dington, Scotland. 

H. Ide, Elm Lawn, Eden Street, Kingston-on- 
Thames. 

William Jamrach, 65, Lordship Lane, Stoke New- 
ington, N. 

Mrs. E. Jordan, Gorthie, Wokingham. 

Mrs. Johnstone, Burrswood, Groombridge, Kent. 

Alderman J. D. Kiley, J. P., 33, Gun Street, 
Spitalfields. 

W. King, 23, High Street, Whitechapel. 

C. F. Leach, Vale Lodge, Leatherhead. 

P. L. Morgan, Westfield, Elgin, Scotland. 

Dan Mason, Maisonette, Broadstairs. 

John W. Marsden, Thornhurst, Tewit Park, Har- 
rogate. 

G. J. B. Meade-Waldo, Stonewall Park, Eden- 
bridge, Kent. 

R. Scott-Miller, Greenoakhill, Broomhouse, Scot- 
land. 

Mrs. C Prioleau, Loxwood House, Billinghurst. 

L. Pullar, Dunbarnie Cottage, Bridge of Earn. 

Monsieur Pichot, Boulevard Haussman, Paris. 

A. Reeve, Hall-by-the-Sea, Margate. 

Ernest W. Robinson, Liscombe, Leighton Buz- 
zard. 

Gerald Rattigan, Frou Selen Hall, Caersws, Mont- 
gomeryshire. 

Warren Bruce Smith, Aubrey Lodge, Emsworth, 
Hants. 

G. de Southoff, Leysin, Vaud, Switzerland. 

Dr. W. O. Stillman, 287, State Street, Albany, 
N.Y., U.S.A. 

H. S. Spencer, 109, Barcombe Avenue, Streatham 
Hill. 

Dr. Steel, Londonderry. 

W. H. St. Quinton, Scampston Hall, Rillington, 
York. 

W. R. Templr, Ormonde, Datchet, Bucks. 

W. D. Trickett, I.rnch House, Waterfoot. 

A Carr Walker, Tyrie, "West Park. Leeds. 

W. Wightman, Estate Office, Aynhoe, Banbury. 

G. L. de Waru, Les Lilas, Leysin, Vaud, Swit- 
zerland. 

Walter \\ inans, Claridge's' Hotel, Brook Street, 
W. 

Captain Woodward, Mayville, Kingston-by-Sea, 
Brighton. 

E. Wuiron, 7, Rue Theophile Gautier, Neuill), 
pres Paris. 

Messrs. Willsons, 37, New Oxford Street, W. 

A. S. Yates, Bishops Sutton, Alresford, Hants. 



p= 



>«< 



=* 



Hamlyns 









JAN S3 1916 






Menagerie 
Magazine. 



: 



No. 8.-V0I. 2. 



DECEMBER, 1916. 



Price One Shilling 



CONTENTS. 



NOTICE 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

OUR TRADE IN 1915—16 

INTERESTING ANIMALS AT VICTORIA BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA 

RUSSIAN AND SIBERIAN CAGE-BIRDS 

BIRDS IN THE SAN FRANCISCO FIRE 

IMPORTATION OF LIVE BIRDS 

GENERAL NOTES 



& 



>Qc 



relegrams: Hamlyn, London Docks, London, 



Telephone : 4360 Avenue 




JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East. 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station 

Buses pass Leman Street, Whiteohapel, from all parts thence five minutes walk. 
P 0.0. payable at Leman Street, East. Cheques crossed " London County &> Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TERMS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from me of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back. TELEPHONE.— Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS. — Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIYERY. — Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

For the arrivals from abroad during the past month. Full Particulars are given in 



General Notes.' 



The fifth consignment from Calcutta is due about December 

15th. The following live stock is expected. 
400 Rhesus Monkeys. 
1 Tigress. 
1 Python. 
8 Entellus Monkeys. 

100 Sothe P a7t etS ) ThC laSt Pa - keetS t0 "** 



The sixth consignment due end of December : — 
2 Elephants— 4 feet high. 
1 Tigress — adult. 
400 Rhesus Monkeys. 
100 Shamahs. The last birds I shall receive from Calcutta. 



South African Arrivals. 

The " Carlisle Castle " has arrived with two female 
Zebras. 

I also receive later one thousand Birds, which will be the 
for some time to come. 



3 Zebra— 1 Stallion, 2 Mares 
5 Gnus— 1 Bull, 4 Cows 



Arrive end of December. 



Blue and White Foxes : 3 Blue, 2 Whites, all in first-class 

condition. each £10 

These are at present deposited with Messrs. Jennison, 
Belle Vue, Manchester, who will be pleased to shew them 
to intending purchasers. They will not be sold one penny 
less than £10 each. 

1 Norwegian Pine Marten ... 

In absolute perfect condition. 



An 



Most interesting pet. 



6 Californian Quail, 5 cocks, 1 hen 



lot £3 



Grey Squirrels. 

Arriving end November direct from New York, 
application. 



Wanted to Purchase. — Swans, Geese, Rare Pheasants, 
Antelopes, Indian Cattle, Kangaroos, Baboons, Monkeys, 
every description of Animals and Birds for prompt Cash. 
Do not dispose of any duplicates whatever to any Zoological 
Public Gardens, Amateur or others, until you have 
my refusal. 



1 Chattering Lory 

6 Dogfaced Monkeys ... 

1 Patas, very large 

1 Mona 

1 Campbells 

1 pair large Barbary Apes 
1 pair large Chaemas ... 
6 Fallow and Red Deer 



120/- 
200/- 
60/- 
60/- 
£20 
£26 
£30 



The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at The Zoologi 
cal Society's Gardens, Regents Park, London : — 
1 Alligator, 6 feet ... each 

1 „ 5£feet 

3 Giant Toads (Bufo marinus) 

5 Small „ ,, 

2 Adorned Terrapins 

1 Gopher Tortoise 

1 Heloderm Lizard, poisonous 



15/2 
20/6 
30/6 
40/6 
60/6 



Some 40 or 50 American Snakes, suitable for Snake Pit. 
on application. 



Ferrets. 

The largest buyer in Great Britain, 
am prepared to pay cash for one thousand Ferrets at a 
moment's notice. 



Norwich and Yorkshire Canaries. 

Four thousand Canaries bought in fourteen days for cash. 

I am prepared to purchase a thousand pairs of Canaries for 

cash immediately. 



Wanted : 



British Birds. 

-Goldfinches, Bullfinches, Skylarks, etc. 
prices. 



State lowest 



Hamlijtts JIUitttjjerie JHagajta. 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 8.— Vol. 2. 



LONDON, DECEMBER, 1916. 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 



Important Notice. 



ALTERATION IN TELEPHONE NUMBER. 



On and after January 1st, 1917, 
AVENUE 4360. 

AVENUE 6341 UP TO DECEMBER 31st ONLY. 



NOTICE. 

The subscription for Vol. II., 1916—17, is 
10/-, post! free. If your name is not in 
the list on back page, kindly post 10/- without 
any delay. All subscriptions commence with No. 
1 of Vol. 2. Yearly subscriptions only received. 
Specimen copies can be sent post free on receipt 
of twelve penny stamps. Subscribers not receiv- 
ing their Magazine should communicate at once 
with the Editor. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE. 

All Subscribers in Norway, Sweden, Den- 
mark, Spain, Portugal, Switzerland, Holland and 
United States, who have not received their usual 
numbers, are requested to communicate at once 
with the Editor. They will in future receive the 
Magazine through the Office of Messrs. W. H. 
Smith and Son, Strand, W.C. 

* * * * 

By arrangement with Messrs. W. H. Smith 
& Son, 186, Strand, W.C, "Hamlyn's Menagerie 
Magazine" is on sale on the 16th of each month 
at the following Railway Stations : — 

Charing Cross (South Eastern and Chatham 
Railway). 

King's Cross (Great Northern Railway). 

Liverpool Street (Great Eastern Railway). 

St. Pancras (Midland Railway). 

Victoria (South Eastern and Chatham Rail- 
way). 

Waterloo (South Western Railway). 



OUR TRADE IN 1915-16. 



AN EXPLANATION. 

Perhaps a few remarks on the General Trade 
during the last two years of War, 1915 — 16, will 
interest my readers. 

I have never had such a year of worry and 
trouble for a period extending- over forty years 
as during 1916. 

At the commencement of the War, we were 
advised to carry on Business as Usual, so I 
decided to do so. 

In July, 1914>, our turnover was £900. In 
August, first month of the War, it dropped to £20 
— twenty pounds September, October and Nov- 
ember were about the same. A continuation of 
such business meant absolute ruin. I found. there 
was noi sale for foreign animals or birds in Great 
Britain. 

Having a large stock of small animals, cost- 
ing a considerable sum to keep, I offered them 
to a Rotterdam dealer. By return of post he ac- 
cepted the animals, provided I took canaries in 
payment, which he suggested hight find a ready 
sale in Great Britain. I had never dealt in carariesi 
before, and was rather dubious as toi whether 
there was a sale for these birds. I reasoned that 
canaries would certainly appeal to the general 
public and, as a sporting venture, I decided to 
take one thousand hens. It was my only chance. 
I found to my utter astonishment that the thou- 
sand birds were sold in two' days. The Rotter- 
dam dealer was willing to take every possible 
animal in exchange for canaries. 

And so the trade grew; it was nothing un- 
usual' to sell £2100 worth of canaries on a Satur- 
day morning. This exchange business continued 
up to July, 1916, since then the demand for the 
Dutch birds has practically ceased. 

I daresay quite twenty thousand canaries passed 
through my hands in twelve months. They saved 
the situation, for without this trade I should have 
been submerged and lost. 

I have given the above information because 
the trade — friend and foe — wondered why I 
entered into the canary business. 



58 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



We are now cultivating the exportation of 
British canaries to America. This also' has caused 
some excitement in the fancy, for even one of the 
leading Trade Journals came out with startling 
headlines: "A Canary Famine"; "Why breed 
canaries and allow them to leave the country," 
so and so forth 

It would interest me greatly to know what 
would have become of the twenty thousand canar- 
ies if I had not sent them to New York, and 
Whether the thousands of pounds paid to the 
various breeders has not greatly benefited the 
entire trade and the public in general. 

Just to give one instance, the sum of £1,470 
(one thousand four hundred and seventy pounds) 
was paid in ten days, November 17th to Novem- 
ber 2l7th. The consignment leaving on the " Man- 
churia," December 16th, will number 4,000 birds, 
value about £1,500. All good American money 
left in the Old Country. After December the 
demand slackens, prices — if we are to continue 
buying — will be greatly reduced and our canary 
season will finish in March, 1917, much to our 
regret. 

Before leaving the Canary subject, I wish to 
refer to the peculiarities of two country dealers 
out of some fifty who have supplied us. 

One gentleman was very successful in pass- 
ing off hens for cocks, the other added insult to 
injury in not only sending hens for cocks, but "fak- 
ing" them up with a well-known colouring matter. 

For their special benefit they must know that 
we have an expert who examines and reports on 
every bird received. 

Regarding the animal trade this, for the time 
being, is centred in London. The Americans who 
formerly obtained their supplies on the Continent 
now purchase in Great Britain. 

It is a very long time since any carnivora 
arrived in London. We received last month two 
Bengal Tigers, being the first to arrive here for 
years. 

On December 16th we receive 400 Monkeys, 
1 Tigress, 2! Zebras, with other stock, and at the 
end of December 2' Elephants, 21 Tigers, Monkeys, 
Bears and Leopards, all of which are for the 
American market. 

The Authorities, in their wisdom, have pro- 
hibited the importation of live birds, this has been 
done with a view to "freight space," but consid- 
ering all live stock is shipped on deck at owners 
risk, this hardly applies. I am assured that this 
prohibition is only temporary. 

In conclusion, I thank my patrons for the 
support given to this Magazine, and sincerely 
trust that when writing this article for December, 
1917, that peace will have been declared with a 
glorious victory for the Allied Forces. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



Interesting Animals at Victoria British 
Columbia, Canada. 

By James G. French, F.Z.S. 

Thinking that the readers of your Magazine 
might like to hear something of the Zoological 
activities in this rather remote portion of the 
British Empire, I have sent you some account of 
the latest arrivals of wild animals., birds and rep- 
tiles at this port. Victoria may seem to be an 
out of the way place for the reception of many 
specimens from foreign countries, but in reality it 
is favourably situated for\such operations, having 
several steamship lines operating monthly boats 
to Japan, China, and other Oriental countries, as 
well as boats to' Australia, California', and Alaska, 
not to mention the furred and feathered inhabitants 
of the forest clad mountains of our own coast 
region, and the rolling grassy hills of the dry in- 
terior of this province, manyof which, when ob- 
tained, are generally welcorffed to comfortable 
homes in the Zoological Gardens of many distant 
countries. 

On the 24th of August of this year, the s.s. 
"Niagara," oft the New Zealand Steamship Co., 
brought over a large and varied collection of speci- 
mens from Sydney, Australia, consisting of ninety 
three species of mammals, birds and eptiles, the 
property of Mr. Ellis S. Joseph, a cosmopolitan 
collector of wide experience and much ability. As 
this collection arrived from Australia, we naturally 
give the Marsupials our first consideration, and 
their boxes contained not only many specimens, 
but were rich in species of great interest rarely 
represented in our public Zoos. Taking the poly- 
protodonts first we have two fine examples of that 
now almost extinct animal, the Thylacine, or 
marsupial wolf of Tasmania, male and female, 
and ten specimens of the Black Dasyure, common- 
ly known as the Tasmnian Devil. In Diprotodonts 
the collection contined some really fine specimens 
of Kangaroos, eighteen large greys and seven 
reds, also Wallaroos, of which there are ten ex- 
amples. Two Black Kangaroos from Kangaroo 
Island are looking remarkably well after their 
long journey, and the fifty-two Wallabies are 
made up by the following specimens : — two Parrys 
Wallaby, two rufus necked, two Parmas, two 
Rufus bellied, four Agiles, four Black Swamps, 
two Nail Tails, eight Bennetts, and twenty-six 
Rock Wallabies. 

Mr. Joseph also has two male specimens of 
the Queensland Tree Kangaroo, which appear well 
kept hardy animals, and are standing- confinement 
well. 

Wombats are very seldom brought to any 
part of America, but we can now boast of ten 
specimens of which three show melanistic tenden- 
cies, one large female, who carries a big- baby in 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



59 



her pouch, being almost jet black. The young one 
is also very dark coloured. 

The Phalangers brought over in this shipment 
would appear to offer a favourable opportunity to 
some enterprising American fur farmer who wants 
to start a 'possum ranch, there being nineteen 
grey Australian opossums, one Albino, and ten of 
the dark form from Tasmania. Also seven Squir- 
rel flying Phalangers, a pretty and interesting 
little animal, which few menagerie owners have 
included in their collections. 

Of the other peculiarly Australian class, the 
Monotremes, two animals left Sydney, one Duck- 
billed Platpus and one Echidna, or porcupine 
anteater, but only the latter arrived alive. 

The African Elephant, "Daisy," a young fe- 
male about five feet high, was obtained by Mr. 
Joseph in Rhodesia in 1914, and she created quite 
a sensation by following her owner about the 
streets of Victoria and into the office of the Steam- 
ship Co., but she has now been sent, to form the 
nucleus of another Zoological Collection to be 
made in a city park. 

A pair of Black Buck from India and four 
Cape Hyrab complete the Ungulata contained in 
this lot. 

Two fine Indian Sloth Bears, one Himalayan 
Black Bear, one large African Leopard, also four 
red foxes of British stock acclimatised in Austra- 
lia, and an albino animal of the same species, 
make a carnivorous variation to the mainly Mar- 
supial tendency among the mammals of this con- 
signment. 

The birds brought over on the " Niagara" will 
compare favourably with any collection ever 
shipped this way across the Pacific. Raptores 
were, however, but poorly represented, although 
there are six fine examples of the Wedge-tailed 
Eagle Aquila audax G.I., some adult and some in 
brown immature plumage. The Passerines were 
a mixed lot, the most interesting to my mind being 
eight White-winged Choughs (Corcorax Melan- 
orhamphus) of Australia, and two Pied Crow 
Shrikes (Strepera gramlina W), another corvine 
bird from the same country. There were also 
twelve Australian Magpies, one Albino Magpie, 
and two Butcher Birds (Cracticus destructor), and 
one Salin Bower Bird. 

The small bird boxes were filled with the 
following : — one hundred Grey Java Sparrows, 
ten Plum Heads, twenty Double Bars or Bichenos 
Finch, eight Japanese Grosbeaks, four hundred 
Zebra Finches, nine Red Heads, one hundred 
Chestnut-breasted Munias, one hundred Diamond 
Finches, four Parson Finches, and eight Parrot 
Finches (Ejrythrura psittacea) from New Cale- 
donia, seven Emeus, two Australian Native Com- 
panion Cranes, one White Necked Crane, four 



Common Cranes, two> Demoiselle Cranes, two 
Australian White Ibis, one pair of Straw-necked 
Ibis, and two Thicknees or Australian Stone 
Plover, make a creditable collection to grace the 
large bird paddocks of any zoological park. 

There were also three specimens of the Col- 
lared Plover (Zonifer tricolor Vuill). There were 
six species of Game birds, including two Mallee 
Fowl or native pheasant Lipoa ocellata, and four 
Talegallas or Brush Turkeys. The others were 
seven Stubble Quails, one Painted Quail, four 
Golden Pheasants, sixteen Ring-necked Pheasants 
and three Blue Water Hens. 

The aquatic birds were a fine lot, and the 
most attractive of them all is a bird very seldom, 
if ever, before kept alive in captivity, that is a 
specimen of the Giant Petrel (Ossifraga gigantea), 
and this wandering denizen of the limitless South- 
ern seas has settled himself down in a most domes- 
ticated manner; we have christened him "Sailor," 
and he comes when called, with outstretched wings 
and waddling gait, to receive his daily rations of 
chopped up horse meat. The three Black and 
White Australian Pelicans are a more showy spe- 
cies than the all white birds usually seen in Public 
Parka. 

Of the Anatidae there arrived eight Black 
Swans, fourteen Maned Geese, three Cape Barren 
Geese, two African Spur-wing Geese, two Austra- 
lian Black Duck, two Ruddy Sheldrakes, two 
Whistling Tree Ducks, two Drakes of the New 
Zealand Paradise Duck, four Mountain Duck, and 
a large bunch of Clucking Teals, Mandarins and 
Pintails. 

When we go into a well filled parrot house 
and note the many attractive forms and brilliant 
and many coloured plumes of its often garrulous 
and restless inhabitants, the mind naturally turns 
to the varied localities from which they have been 
collected, and the eye sees in imagination the 
primaeval forests and sunlit groves of many a 
tropic isle. But it is not only from their natural 
habitat, or from the educational point of view, 
that the public take an interest in these birds, as 
large numbers are purchased by private individ- 
uals who like to keep cage birds as pets, and Polly 
or Cocky, in his fancy cage is often seen to oc- 
cupy the bay window overlooking the front garden 
or some cosy nook in the back parlour where his 
linguistic efforts amuse both the family and their 
visitors. The birds on the "Niagara" were of 
many kinds, both wild birds by dozens in wooden 
travelling boxes, and rarer birds, Famed or Talk- 
ing, carried in the ordinary wire cages of the 
shops. Two Madagascar Vasa Parrots, in sombre 
grey dress, occupy one wire cage, gaudy, green 
and red King Parrots in others, a hen specimen of 
the Princess Alexandria Parrot, and a Crimson 
Wing from Australia, Green Eclectus from the 
spice islands of the East, and a pair of Kea Par- 



60 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



rots from New Zealand, the sheep eating kind, 
whose acquired taste for mutton has caused it to 
become a nuisance on the sheep ranges of its 
native country. 

Boxes of Sulphur Crests, Leadbeaters, Rosy 
Cockatoos, Rosellas, Moreton Bays, a lesser Sul- 
phur Crest, and a Timor Cockatoo, and a species 
of Nichoglossas from New Caledonia. These were 
the parrots, and the collection of Doves and Pig- 
eons were equally interesting, mostly Australian 
species, however, two Wonga Wonga, two Brush 
Bronze Wings (Phaps elegans), a lot of Common 
Bronze Wings (Phaps chalcoptera), Pink-eyed 
Doves (Geopelia cuneata), with their pretty white 
spotted wing coverts, Blue-eyed Doves (Geopelia 
Tranquilla), Bar-shouldered Doves (Geopelia hu- 
meralis), Crested Doves (Octyphaps Cophotes), 
and Bronzed Ground Doves (Chalcophaps Indica) 
from the East Indies, complete the list of birds. 

The reptiles were not so> numerous, : three 
large Moniter Lizards, fourteen Water Dragoons, 
three Frilled Lizards, and two small but attractive 
Geekos species of Phylurua, and a lot of long- 
necked Chelidean Tortoises make up the lot. 

On the morning of October 16th ten pair of 
American Wood Duck came through by express 
from the Eastern States, and on the afternoon of 
the same day the s.s. "President," of the Pacific 
Coast Steamship Co., landed the following stock 
at the outer wharf from San Francisco : — one 
Californian Cinnamon Bear, one large female 
Kodiak Bear, three Leopards, one Bay Lynx, two 
American Badgers, three Skunks, one hundred 
Chipmunks, three African Cock Ostriches, one 
Green Macaw, eight small white fronted Parrot's 
(Chrysotis albifrons), and one all green Conure 
(Conurus holochlrous), which, like its travelling 
mates, is a native of South-western Mexico and 
the jungles of Chiapas. There were also one hun- 
dred Strawberry Finches, and seven Java Mon- 
keys from the East Indies. 



RUSSIAN & SIBERIAN CAGE-BIRDS. 

By a Russian. 

English fanciers are familiar with Russian 
and Siberian birds, which were imported into 
the United Kingdom sometimes in ver large quan- 
tities before the war. They consisted for the 
most part of species equally common in Western 
Europe, but belonged to races or varieties of lar- 
ger isizie, characterized by brighter colouring and 
a quieter disposition — a Northern temperament 
which adapted itself more easily to captive life. 
Besides this last advantage, these birds could 
stock the aviaries of fanciers instead of native 



birds of the same species, which it is not desirable 
to catch, so as not to diminish their numbers. 

Now, these birds used to be imported from 
Russia through the medium of the German dealers 
of Hamburg and elsewhere. These, in their turn, 
generally received them from compatriots living at 
Moscow and Petrograd, who bought them, at a 
ridiculous price, from the Russian countryfolk. 
A hawker from the North of Russia or from 
Siberia, arriving at Moscow with the results of a 
Summer's catching, found a buyer for his birds 
for some five kopeks apiece, one with another 
(one penny !). In the lot the local German buyer 
sometimes found rare birds like the Azure Tit 
(Porus cyanus), the Siberian Jay (Perisoreus in- 
faustus), etc., which he would sell again at a 
price which hecouped him for the expense of the 
whole consignment and the transport charges, 
leaving him a nice profit. From Germany to 
England the price of the birds went up still more. 

It seems to me that some Englishmen might 
advantageously replace the Mullers, Wallmanns, 
etc. , etc. , whom the Russians do not and will not 
want any more in this trade. Establishing a 
depot for the birds at Riga, they could easily 
send them thence to England, America, and even 
Germany. The expense of installation would be 
almost nothing, and — by showing themselves hon- 
est traders and not exploiters like the Boches — ■ 
they would quickly gain the confidence of the 
Russian bird-catchers of Siberia and elsewhere, 
who have not the same facilities for export on their 
own account. Ornithology would be a gainer 
thereby, for the Germans, in their hurry to make 
money, used to neglect species which were diffi- 
cutl to obtain. 

The language is the only difficulty, but Ris- 
sion is not so hard to learn as people think, and 
generally, the Russians themselves, even when il- 
literate, learn languages very quickly. In the 
Belgian factories in the Urals, the workmen have 
almost all picked up French by association with 
their overseers. 



Birds in the San Francisco Fire. ^ 

By Dr. Frederick W. D'E,velyn. 

The anniversary date of April 18th, 1906, not 
unnaturally recalls some memories of that never 
to be forgotten event. The immediate results of 
the earthguake shock were many and serious. It 
was not, however, until a general fire alarm told 
to the stricken citizens that a new and, as it proved 
to be a more disastrous, agent had intruded its 
unwelcome presence. From a dozen centres at 
once the flames burst forth, and presently the 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



vanguard of what soon was to> become a general 
exodus appeared, the fleeing householders retreat- 
ing in sullen reluctance before the advancing 
flames. In the midst of thet ragedy there appeared 
ever and anon a phase of comedy. 

The smoke-begrimmed, fire-scorched, nerve- 
wrecked cavalcade was a sad sight. The nature 
student could not, however, fail to note the com- 
plications of bird life which strangely intermixed. 
Canaries in cages, parrots on broom-handles, 
cockatoos in gilded cages from the wealthy homes, 
already claimed space amongst the piles of sal- 
vage — hastily located in the wider streets and 
parks. 

When, however, the stream of humbler folk 
blended with the main current, many novel demon- 
strations of sad eperiences became evident. Pets 
of all types were lugged along with a devotion 
that was at once piteous and comic. 

One dear old lady, whose white hair hung un- 
kempt upon her pallid face, carried a coal-scuttle 
in one hand and in the other a breeding cage with 
nests, seed boxes and two terror stricken canaries. 
The sanitary condition of the cage was proof posi- 
tive that avian housekeeping, amongst the cotter- 
folk was not by any means up to the municipal 
standard of healthy homes. Next came a little 
Italian boy, with a stump-tailed parakeet hanging 
by beak and claws to his coat-collar, while he 
trailed along a demijohn of wine. 

Later we met with a Scotchman, not yet fully 
forgetful of his home instincts, probably the here- 
ditary reflex of many generations, for in a paper- 
protected, red-stained wooden cage, carried be- 
neath his right arm, both hands being fully bur- 
dened with bundles, we saw crouching in abject 
terror a British "lintie," the poor, little foreigner 
probably even then homesick for the banks and 
braes of the land of the gorse and heather. By 
noon the flames had already devastated an area 
one mile long by one and one-half miles in width. 
In the seething blast-furnace conflagration many 
of the refugees had been overtaken, and in the 
urgent and relentless retreat had surrendered to 
a fiery death many of the belongings and pets they 
had so bravely striven in the earlier morn to secure 
and rescue. 

On the opposite side of the leading thorough- 
fare stood the famous Call Building, a magnificent 
stone structure capped by a restaurant, the loftiest 
in the world, and the resort of all tounsts, who 
enjoyed from its windows an unrivaled panorama 
of the city, bay and distant foothills. Alongside 
this building was a number of smaller ones, one 
of which was the famous " Old Crow" saloon. The 
window of this saloon had been placed at the 
entire disposal of two crows — Corvus Americanus 
— two fated trademark specimens which always 



had a large audience outside as they disported 
themselves on a ten-foot tree stump and ate raw 
meat. 

One was an especially bad character, known 
to the police. He could talk, whistle and on occa- 
sions would outrival in loguacity and gesture a 
star comedian. This specimen had a crippled 
wing. The fire was very intense. The big build- 
ing was already smouldering inside while furtive 
tongues of flame told only too> surely that it was 
being eaten through and through. At this time 
I was in my office diagonally across the street, 
and was astonished in the midst of the disaster 
by the appearance of a large bird, which at first I 
took for a pigeon flying out of the fire-zone and 
lighting upon the window sill scarce an arm's 
length from where I was standing. On closer in- 
spection I recognized the sound specimen of the 
two crows from the saloon opposite. The poor 
thing was terror-stricken and hung to the heated 
window for only a moment, and then fiew over 
the corner of the building to an adjacent house, 
simply to experience, lam afraid, but a temporary 
respite from the fiery fate which befell its notorious 
companion. The bird had evidently escaped when 
the heated air had broken the plate-glass window 
of the saloon. 

One of the most extraordinary bird escapes 
which came under my personal observation was 
that of a canary. Its cage, which had been crushed 
by the falling of a building, was absolutely flat- 
tened out, except at one corner, in which the bird 
was imprisoned. The bird stil Hives, like the soli- 
tary escaped prisoner of Pelee, a sole survivor, and 
sings, perhaps, a Te Neum of gratitude to the 
great nature god which saved it, a veritable brand 
from the burning. Many moe instances might be 
recorded, but space forbids. 

It is pleasant to record that the strong wes- 
tern spirit of determination, pluck and manhood 
has triumphed and the relics and experiences of 
the great disaster are already memories, simply 
event's in the stirring life of men and things which 
are blended in the evolution of the new city of 
San Francisco. 

This spirit is not inaptly described by the ex- 
pression of an old man. A few dacs before the 
calamity I visited a veteran cobler, a veritable 
character and a "natural" bird fancier. His store, 
a large, big-windowed room; window and room 
rich in tapestry of cob-webs, dust and grime; a 
dozen or more cages, piled high with seed husks 
and droppings, and tenanted by canaries, native 
linnets, California goldfinches and some unclassi- 
fied specimens hanging upon the wall — such was 
the picture presented. It is hardly necessary to 
state his nationality, he was neither a scientist nor 
an ornithologist, but his observations and mother- 
wit afforded a not altogether unsuccessful substi- 
tute. In a little grimy cage, sadly forbidding in 



62 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



the bright beams of California, sunshine which fil- 
tered through the network of cobwebs, hung a soli- 
tary specimen of the sociable finch, the Bengalee 
hybrid, or as the old man said "soger" finch. 

"Watch him," he remarked. Presently the 
little bird burst into one of those silent rhapsodies 
of song, accompanied by the expanded tail and odd 
body movements so familiar to keepers of foreign 
finches. The old cobbler with a gleam in his eye 
and a broad, but ungraceful grin upon his rigged 
face, exclaimed: "Look at him! Look! He is 
doing his damnedest to be happy.' 

A rude but truthful commentary upon the 
spirit of the West, which with magnificent cour- 
age, looked forward, not backward, and confident 
of its powers, has proved itself by the up-building 
of a braver and better city. 



IMPORTATION OF LIVE BIRDS. 

By John D. Hamlyn. 

There have been several arrivals during the 
last five weeks by Amateur Dealers. Some con- 
signments were getting so regular that the worthy 
Editor of " Bird Notes" would soon have to> be 
classified as a Professional Dealer. 

Unfortunately the last sending from Calcutta 
included a fine Hornbill, which died during the 
voyage. The mortality was rather above the 
average. Respecting the South African birds on 
the "Kenilworth Castle," also a private venture, 
these were detained several days, and then only 
released by a Special Customs Board's Order. I 
was informed in the Tilbury Docks that no actual 
licence was obtained, only the above Order. There 
were two consignments on the " Walmer Castle," 
one consisting of two Stanley Cranes for which a 
special licence was granted, the other, a private 
venture of some hundred Cape Finches. I am not 
aware under what conditions these were landed. 

Regarding the importations from France, the 
following communication comes from the Presi- 
dent of the Board of Trade : — 

"The importation of Live Birds, other than 
Poultry and Game, was prohibited by a Procla- 
mation issued on the 3rd October. Licences to 
import all prohibited articles from France are 
issued only by the Paris Branch of our Re- 
stricted Imports Department, and this Branch 
acts on applications vises by the French Minis- 
try of Commerce. The right course is for the 
consignors or exporters of the birds to com- 
municate with the Ministry at No. 66, Rue de 
Bellechasse, Paris. 

"Yours very truly, 

"R. W. MATTHEW." 



Board of Trade, 

Whitehall Gardens, S.W.; 

30th October, 1916." 
The Ministry above-mentioned, after having 
passed such a communication, transmit it to the 
English bureau, which, if there are no objections, 
will issue a licence for importation in duplicate — 
one to the consignee and the other t!o the consig- 
nor, or exporter. This licence, however, only 
touches on birds in France, and apparently on 
birds of France, since the regulation runs — " En- 
fin, le benefice des licences ne devant s'applivuer 
gu'aux produits d'origine francaise — ." 

Form of Demand for Authority to Import Certain 
Goods into England. 

Je soussigne (nom, qualite et adresse) 

demande que 1 'importation en Angleterre des mar- 
chandises designees ci-apres et declarees. 6tre 
d'origine ou de fabrication francaise soit auto- 
risee. 

Nom, qualite et adresse de l'expediteur. 

Nom, quality et adresse du destinataire 

Port de debarquement dans le Royaume-Uni 

Nature de la marchandise... 

(Indication a fournir en francais et en anglais.) 

Nombre, marques et numeros des colis 

Poids des colis 

Date Signature. 

Nota. — Cette demande, appuyeed'une attestation 
d'origine, emanant de la Chambre de Commerce 
ou, a defaut, de l'autorite municipale, doit etre 
presentee ou adressee au Ministere du Com- 
merce (Service Technique), 66, rue de Belle- 
chasse, Paris. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

THAT the worthy Director of the Zoological Gar- 
dens, Copenhagen, writes under date 24th Octo- 
ber, that he has postponed his visit to Singa- 
pore until January, 1817. That the Gardens 
have lost two out of three Chimpanzees lately, 
but have received some animals from Singapore, 
also a Python reticulatus which is of great size, 
one of the largest 1 ever seen. 

THAT two young wild boars have been sent to 
the London Zoo by Captain Portal, a fellow of 
the Zoological Society, from a French forest 
near the fighting line. 

THAT visitors to the Zoological Gardens from 
January 1 to October 31 numbered 1,029,228, 
an increase of 14,400 compared with the corres- 
ponding ten months in 1915. 

THAT the Western Aviary, one of the oldest 
buildings in the Zoo, is now in course of par- 
tial demolition to make room for the south en- 
trance to the new tunnel. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



63 



Its occupants, comprising Australian bower 
birds, sun bitterns, fruit pigeons, and other 
birds, have been transferred to a portion of the 
aviary which will be left standing. 

The Western Aviary was erected in 1849,. 
It is anticipated that the new work will be com- 
pleted by Easter. 
THAT a number of ,small animals have been 
added to the collection in the Scottish Zoologi- 
cal Park recently. The additions include several 
interesting waterfowl, among them a pair of 
white-fronted geese and a pair of bean geese, a 
male spur-winged goose (a species inhabiting 
West Africa), and a pain of Chilian teal. Of 
new wading birds which have been added in 
the past week or two are specimens of the cur- 
lew, grey plover, spur-winged plover, black- 
tailed godwit, ruff, and oyster-catcher, together 
with an Australian pectoral rail. Four hand- 
reared specimens of the Scottish red grouse ar- 
rived lately. In the acclimatisation house are 
several new monkeys, including two spelimens 
of Burnett's monkey, a somewhat rare species, 
from West Africa. Another interesting addi- 
tion is a specimen of the South African porcu- 
pine, which is also- on view in the acclimatisa- 
tion house. 

THAT the Canadians have been visiting their pet 
Bears in our London Zoo. 

THAT I have received the following from Cape 
Town : — 

"A remarkable battle between two dogs 
and a savage baboon took place recently at 
the Rietkuil farm, in the Vitenhage district. 
Natives seeing a troop of baboons walking up a 
small hill about a hundred yards from the 
homestead of Mr. P. L. Meyer immediately set 
out after them with two dogs, which intercepted 
and drove one of the baboons towards the house. 
"The baboon made for a tank at the corner 
of the house. The dogs vainly tried to get at it 
from the one side, .and the beast jumped down 
the other side and made for a small kloof, where, 
seating itself behind a bush, it awaited the on- 
coming dogs. 

"The foremost dog, a well-grown animal, 
had no sooner reached the bush t'han the baboon 
made a grab at it, and with one bite bit off the 
poor creature's head. The second dog then 
came on the scene, but before long its side was 
ripped open. A shot from a gun fired by a 
native fortunately killed the baboon before any 
more harm could be done." 

THAT the Council of the Royal Zoological Socie- 
ty of Ireland met on Saturday, the President 
presiding. Present — Prof. C. H. Carpenter 
(hon. sec); Dr. MacDowel Cosgrave (hon. 
treas.); James Inglis, Esq.; Dr. Leeper; A. 
Miller, Esq.; Sir F. Moore; Prof. Scott; Dr. 
Scriven; L. E. Steele, Esq.; Sir R. H. Woods. 
Next Wednesday, at 4.15, the secretary remin- 



ded the Council, Prof. J. Arthur Thomson, of 
Aberdeen University, would give his lecture for 
the society in the Royal Dublin Society's Thea- 
tre. This is the first time Prof. J. Arthur Thom- 
son has lectured under the auspices of the 
Royal 1 Zoological Society, and the Society hope 
for as good if not a better attendance as that 
which generally fills the theatre when lectures 
are given for the Dublin Zoo. The prevailing 
wet weather prevented many visitors to the Gar- 
dens for the past week, and the turnstiles only 
registered 371 for the week. Lower than for 
some considerable time. The monkeys miss 
visitors more perhaps than any other of the ani- 
mals in the Gardens, a s they do like a gallery 
to play to. The Council hope to> acquire some 
monkeys they have been offered shortly for the 
large central cage. The lion cubs born at rJie 
beginning of the month are doing well. They 
are the offsprings of the Irish lions "Con" and 
"Maive," and in their snug nursery they do not 
trouble their small woolly heads as to the state 
of the weather, plenty of straw and a warm 
corner to' huddle in is sufficient for them. 
THAT the " Daily Express" gives the following 
account of a Tiger loose in a train : — 

"Great excitement was caused at the Cal- 
cutta terminus a few days ago, when, on the 
arrival of the Madras mail train it became known 
that a full-grown Bengal tiger had broken loose 
from its cage in the luggage-van at the end of 
the train, and was running amok. 

"The tiger — a mignificent specimen — was 
part of a consignment sent by the Maharajah 
of Mysore as a gift to the Calcutta Zoo, the 
other animals being two llamas and six kan- 
garoos, a cockerel and two hens, the tiger hav- 
ing a cage to himself. 

"A coolie entered the compartment adjoin- 
ing the cages on the train's arrival at Calcutta, 
and saw to his horror that the tiger had at 
some stage in the journey broken out of its cage 
and entered the cage in which the llamas and 
poultry were ronfined. The coolie ran for his 
life to obtain assistance, and soon a large 
crowd gathered at a respectful distance on the 
railway bridge to> report proceedings. 

" Zoo and railway officials who came hurry- 
ing t'o the scene witnessed a remarkable specta- 
cle. It was found that the tiger had already 
killed the llama and the two hens, but had failed 
to vanquish the cockerel, which was still walk- 
ing about freely, having successfully kept its 
opponent at bay by means of a sort of 'fowl jiu 
jitsu. ' 

"The tiger, again and again, tried its ut- 
most to land its paw on the cockerel, but the 
latter cleverly evaded all blows aimed at it, 
crowing triumphantly after the end of each 
round. 

"The luggage van was finally detached 
from the train and 1 removed to the goods shed 



64 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



by the railway authorities, and after several 
hours some of the iron bars of the luggage van 
were cut away by means of a saw and a new 
cage placed against the opening. 

" It was not until a bucket of water had 
been placed in the new cage, however, that the 
now thirsty tiger was induced to get into' it. 
A porter eyewitness of the astonishing fight be- 
tween the tiger and the cockerel stated that 'if 
every one was afraid of the tiger, the tiger was 
certainly afraid of the cock. ' 

"The cockerel, after the removal of the 
tiger, colly hopped out of the luggage van with- 
out so much as a scratch." 

THAT the Moss Empires are opening a Grend 
Circus at the Olympia, Liverpool, on Boxing 
Day. A great feature in the production will be 
"Tiny," one of the largest elephants to' be found 
in the United States. Other animal novelties 
are also promised. 

THAT the world-famous Bostock and Wombwells 
Menagerie has been doing record business at 
Northampton and Leicester lately. 

This wonderful collection will be exhibited 
at Leeds for the Christmas and New Year's 
holidays, having now received permission from 
the Minister of Munitions, after which all the 
principal towns of Yorkshire will be visited. I 
am also informed that the Italian Circus now 
touring in South Africa are paying a visit for 
the first time to India. 

THAT the World's Fair at Islington will lose 
this year one of its chief attractions. The Zoo- 
logical c ollection this season will be provided 
by a well-known Zoological Amateur, assisted 
by a certain Circus Proprietor. I might men- 
tion in passing that Zoological ambitions have 
spelt disaster to more than one amateur and will 
to many more. 

THAT amateurs have extraordinary ideas of pur- 
chasing animals. Here is an instance : — 

Letter dated October 28rd, 1916. "If the 
"elephant is not already sold, would you be 
"prepared to> sell it for £50 cash down, and the 
"remainder in twelve monthly instalments." 

The natural result would be I should receive 
£50 and, within amonth, a letter somewhat as 
follows: — '"The Elephant broke out of its sta- 
ble last night, and was f ound early in the 
"morning peacefully devouring the contents of 
"the vegetable garden of my neighbour. It 
" alarmed the whole neighbourhood. At first! it 
"was. taken for a Tank which had lost its bear- 
ings. Others in our village thought an air- 
"ship had descended during the night on see- 
"ing the damage done in its triumphal progress 
" to my neighbour's vegetable garden. Not only 
"that, it absolutely dislikes Fido" (then there 
would be a genealogical description of Fido, the 



faithful dog) "consequently I must return the 
"animal without any delay." 

No, gentle amateurs, I am not selling Ele- 
phants on the Hire Purchase System. 

THAT the boom in canaries continues. We are 
purchasing at the rate of one thousand weekly. 
May it always continue so. 

THAT the arrivals of birds are mentioned under 
Import Restrictions. 

THAT the arrivals of animals in Great Britain 
have been practically nil. There have been no 
direct importations of lions,. The arrivals of 
monkeys the last four weeks may have been a 
dozen. 

THAT an Albino Swallow was found recently near 
Amsterdam, Holland. 

Mr. T. Vorstius, President of the Sophia- 
Vereeniging for Animal Protection, writes as 
follows : — " I enclose tk> very curious photo- 
" graphs of a white swallow, taken very care- 
"fullc by a farmer friend of mine living in our 
"neighbourhood. The Director of the Zoologi- 
cal Gardens considered the photograph a great 
"addition to its collection." 

THAT an American correspondent has sent the 
following notes. — 

BANDING WILD DUCKS. 
In order to determine the longevity of wild 
ducks and routes of migration the United States 
Department of Agriculture has caused a large 
number of wild ducks to' be banded. The bands 
bear a serial number so' that in case any of 
them are killed the bands can be returned to the 
Department and the point of release determined. 
Most of those banded were cured of the duck 
sickness prevalent around Great Salt Lake, 
Utah, and there released. The Federal Depart- 
ment of Agriculture is particularly anvious to 
secure reports from these birds to profe their 
complete recovery from this malady which 
has killed thousands of ducks in Utah. 

SAVE THE BIRDS. 
The Massachusetts Fish and Game Protec- 
tive Association has issued a little leaflet of in- 
terest to nature lovers in which the following 
suggestions are offered to show how individ- 
uals can help protect native wild life in this 
country. Among the suggestions are : — " Make 
your land a wild life reservation; put up nest- 
ing boxes for the birds furnish water in sum- 
mer for drinking and bathing; protect them 
from their natural enemies; report violation of 
game laws to authorities; report pollution of 
ponds and streams; interest the children in 
nature study." 

JOHN .D. HAMLYN. 



Printed by W. J. Hasted & Son, (T.U.), 306 Mile End Road London, E. 



KENNET VALLEY FISHERIES, 

HUNGERFORD, BERKSHIRE. 



PRINCIPALS— Major Morse and Sir Edgar C. Bochm, Bt., F.R.G.S. 
TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS— " Fisheries, Hungerford," 
STATION— Hungerford, G.W.R., 1 £ miles. 
All communications to be addressed to the Secretary, Eddington Lodge, Hungerford, Berks. 
The Kennet Fishery -is situated a s hort distance above the town, and is laid out with a view- 
to growing fish under natural conditions for sporting purposes. 

Purchasers can obtain from us special quotations for the class of stock required, and the 
numerous testimonials received assure us that clients will be satisfied. 
Expert advice is given on all matters concerning fishings, etc. 

FOOD AND PLANTS. 

Most kinds of 1 useful and ornamental aquatic or w aterside plants can be supplied at short 
notice. We also recommend most highly our specially prepared fish food. Its constituents are 
carefully selected, and giving the maximum feeding value, avoids sameness of diet; and, being 
buoyant in the water, unlike most other foods, the fish learn to take it on the surface. 
Price 14 lbs. 7/6; per cwt. £1/7/6. 

Also freshwater Snails, Shrimps, Insecta, etc. Prices as per quantity. 

Below is a Price List of our Trout, which is subject to slight variations. A few d ays notice 
is always necessary to net up and prepare the fish for their journey. 



PRICE LIST. 

YEARLING TROUT. 



Salmo Fario (Brown Trout) 4 in minimum ... 
3 in. 

Salmo Iredeus (Rainbow Trout) 5 in. minimum 
,, ,, ,, ,, 4 in. ,, 

,, ?) ,, '»» 3 in. ,, 



TWO YEAH OLD TROUT. 



Brown Trout, 9 in. minimum ... 

,, 8 in. ,, 

„ 7 in. 
Rainbow Trout, 7 to 9 in. minimum 



Per 100 


Per 1,000 


£ s. d. 


£■ s. d. 


1 7 6 


12 


1 3 0' 


9 15 


1 14 3 


15 


1 4 9 


10 


1 


8 15 


Per 100 


Per 50O 


£ s, d. 


£ s. d. 


6 18 


33 


5 3 0' 


24 


3 13 


16 15 


4 12 


21 




Per 100 




£ s. d. 




13 5 




11 




8 15 




9 10 



THREE YEAR OLD TROUT. 



Brown Trout, 12 in. minimum 

„ 11 in. „ 

„ 10 in. ,, 

Rainbow Trout, 10 to 121 in. minimum 

TROUT FRY— Brown and Rainbow at current prices. 

Special quotations for local deliveries, larger orders or sales by average size, and larger trout 
up to 18 inches. 

Address— THE SECRETARY, 

EDDINGTON LODGE, 

HUNGERFORD, 

BERKSHIRE. 



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 



List of Subscribers, for Vol. II., 1916—17. 

The Earl of Lonsdale, Lowther, Penrith. 

The Lord Rothschild, Museum, Tring. 

The Countess of Jersey, Middleton Park, Bices- 
ter. 

The Lady Julia Follett, The Woodside, Old Wind- 
sor. 

The Hon. E. S. Montague, M.P., Bridge Street, 
Cambridge. 

Sir John Bland Sutton, 47, Brook Street, Gros- 
venor Square. 

Sir Edgar Boehm, Bentsbrooke, North Holm- 
wood, Surrey. 

Major Atherley, Croft Castle, Kingsland, Here 
fordshire. 

The Clifton Zoological Gardens, Bristol. 

The Royal Zoological Gardens, Dublin. 

Messrs. Jennison and Co., Belle Vue, Manchester. 

The Director, Royal Zoological Society, Natura 
Artis Magistra, Amsterdam. 

The Superintendent, Zoological Gardens, Alipur, 
Calcutta, India. 

The Director, Zoological Gardens, Tokyo, Japan. 

Robt. D. Carson, Zoological Gardens, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., U.S.A. 

Dr. Penrose, Zoological Gardens, Philadelphia, 
Pa., U.S.A. 

E. A. Le Souef, Zoological Gardens, Perth, Aus- 

tralia. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Copenhagen. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Rotterdam. 
Dr. F. D. Baker, National Zoological Park, 

Washington, D.C. 
Richard Arnold, Tower House, Leigham Court 

Road, Streatham. 
Lieut. Thomas Buchan, Hepburn, Haddington, 

East Lothian. 
Dr. M.Burnshaw, 51, Cazenove Road, Stoke New- 

ington. 

F. E. Blaauw, Gooliust, St. Graveland, Hilver- 

sum, Holland. 

Wm. Shore-Baily, Boyers House, Westbury, 
Wilts. 

Dr. John K. Butter, M.D., Highfield House, Can- 
nock, Staffs. 

G. Chapman, High Street, Birmingham. 
Mrs. Cotton, The Mount, Bishopstoke. 
F. W. D 'Evelyn, San Francisco. 

W. Edmunds, Coombe Farm, Langton Matra- 

vers, Dorset. 
H. Earl, Newgate House, Cottingham, E. Yorks. 
David Ezra, Kydd Stre.t, Calcutta. 
Guy Falkner, Belton, Uppingham. 
Herbert A. French, St. Margaret's, Downs Park 

West, Bristol. 
Linwood Flint, Waterford, Maine, U.S.A. 
R. Gilpin, Zoological Gardens, Washington, U.S. 
Miss Hall, 76, Adelaide Road, Hampstead, N.W. 
Y. E. Harper, Calcutta. 



Miss Howman, 6, Essex Grove, Upper Norwood. 

Rev. Hemsworth, Monks Fryston, S. Milford. 

W. J. Henning, Hillside, New Maiden. 

T. Hebb, Brooklea, Downs Road, Luotn. 

W. A. Harding, Histon Manor, Cambridge. 

Homes Zoological Society, 318, Keith and Perry 
Buildings, Kansas City, U.S.A. 

Lieutenant T. Buchan-Hepburn, Letham, Had- 
dington, Scotland. 

H. Ide, Elm Lawn, Eden Street, Kingston-on- 
Thames. 

William Jamrach, 65, Lordship Lane, Stoke New- 
ington, N. 

Mrs. E. Jordan, Gorthie, Wokingham. 

Mrs. Johnstone, Burrswood, Groombridge, Kent. 

Alderman J. D. Kiley, J. P., 33, Gun Street, 
Spitalfields. 

W. King, 22, High Street, Whitechapel. 

C. F. Leach, Vale Lodge, Leatherhead. 

P. L. Morgan, Westfield, Elgin, Scotland. 

Dan Mason, Maisonette, Broadstairs. 

John W. Marsden, Thornhurst, Tewit Park, Har- 
rogate. 

G. J. B. Meade-Waldo, Stonewall Park, Eden- 
bridge, Kent. 

R. Scott-Miller, Greenoakhill, Broomhouse, Scot- 
— land. 

Mrs. C. Prioleau, Loxwood House, Billinghurst. 

L. Pullar, Dunbarnie Cottage, Bridge of Earn 

Monsieur Pichot, Boulevard Haussman, Paris. 

A. Reeve, Hall-by-the-Sea, Margate. 

Ernest W. Robinson, Liscombe, Leighton Buz- 
zard. 

Gerald Rattigan, Cornwall Gardens, S.W. 

Warren Bruce Smith, Aubrey Lodge, Emsworth, 
Hants. 

G. de Southoff, Leysin, Vaud, Switzerland. 

Dr. W. O. Stillman, 287, State Street, Albany, 
N.Y., U.S.A. 

H. S. Spencer, 109, Barcombe Avenue, Streatham 
Hill. 

Dr. Steel, Londonderry. 

W. H. St. Quinton, Scampston Hall, Rillington, 
York. 

W. R. Temple, Ormonde, Datchet, Bucks. 

W. D. Trickett, Lench House, Waterfoot. 

A. Carr Walker, Tyrie, West Park, Leeds. 

W. Wightman, Estate Office, Aynhoe, Banbury. 

G. L. de Waru, Les Lilas, Leysin, Vaud, Swit- 
zerland. 

Walter Winans, Claridge's Hotel, Brook Street, 
W. 

Captain Woodward, Mayville, Kingston-by-Sea, 
Brighton. 

E. Wuiron, 7, Rue Theophile Gautier, Neuilly, 
pres Paris. 

Messrs. Willsons, 37, New Oxford Street, W. 

A. S. Yates, Bishops Sutton, Alresford, Hants. 



V* 



>o= 






Hamlyns 



ft* 






1 



Menagerie 



Magazine. 






No. 9.- Vol. 2. 



JANUARY, 1917. 



Price One Shilling 






CONTENTS. 



NOTICE 

IMPORTANT NOTICE ... ... ... 

DEATH OF Mr. A. E. JAMRACH 

THE PRESERVATION OF EXPIRING SPECIES 

SOME OBSERVATIONS ON THE HAIRY ARMADILLO IN CAPTIVITY 

F. E. SELOUS 

BOSTOCK AND WOMBWELL'S MENAGERIE IN LEEDS 

GENERAL NOTES 



65 
65 
65 
65 
68 
69 
70 
72 



& 



«C 



Telegrams: Hamlyr, London Docks, London. 



Telephone : 4360 Avenue 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St George's Street, London Docks, East. 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station 

Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence five minutes walk. 
P O.O. payable at Lemon Street, East. Cheques crossed "London County & Westminster Bank.' 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TER^VIS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from me of leaving my establishmc 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back. TELEPHONE. — Orders can be received on telephone, 6341 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS. — Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIYERY. — Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING-. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

For the arrivals from abroad during the past month. Full Particulars are given 



General Notes.' 




From Calcutta. 

The S.3. " City of Bombay " will arrive about the 24th February 
with the following stock : — 

1 Elephant, male, 4£ feet £350 

1 „ female, 4J feet £350 

1 Tiger Cub, female, 10 months £125 

400 Indian Rhesus Monkeys each £2 

Some Rhesus, extra size ,, £8 

5 Indian Pythons from £10 to £25 each 

100 Indian Shamahs each 50/- 

These will be the last Indian Birds I shall receive until 
regulations regarding imports are withdrawn. 



Future Consignments from Calcutta 

will be Rhesus Monkeys, Leopards, Pandas, Snakes, Bears, 



To arrive from Durban. 

2 Zebra Stallions, guaranteed sound 

3 ,, Mares ,, ,, 



each £150 
„ £150 



To arrive from New York. 

4 Sea Lions, from San Francisco each £35 

The only importation for 1917. 




Can offer American Suakes, harmless 

erican Rattlesnakes, poisonous, very fine 

madillo, interesting pet ... 

ngtail Lemur, small, tame 

Mona Monkey, ,,' ,, 

Jew ,, ,, ,, 

Mangabey Monkey ,, , 

Vervet Monkey ,, ,, 

Very large male Chacma Baboon 

Ordinary size ,, ,, 



each £2 

£3 

for £3 

£3 



£2 
£20 
£12 



7 Rhesus Monkeys 

6 Fallow and Red Deer 

7 Canadian Tree Porcupines 
60 ,, Grey Squirrels 



each 
for 
each 70 



Blue and White Foxes : 2 Blue, 2 Whites, all in first-cla 

condition. eac 

These are at present deposited with Messrs. Jennis 
Belle Vue, Manchester, who will be pleased to shew the 
to intending purchasers. They will not be sold one pena 
less than £10 each. 



The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at The Zoologi 
cal Society's Gardens, Regents Park, London : — 
1 Alligator, 6 feet ... each 

1 ,, 5£feet 

3 Giant Toads (Bufo marinus) 

5 Small Tortoise, Brazil 

2 Adorned Terrapins ... 
1 Hcloderm Lizard, poisonous 



6 Californian Quail 

4 Java Sparrows 

3 Alario Finches, 1 cock, 2 hens 
6 African Seedeaters 





15/ 




20/ 




30/ 


.. 


60, 


for 




each 




for 




each 


10 



Ferrets. 

The largest buyer in Great Britain. 

I am prepared to pay cash (6/- each) for one thousand 

Ferrets at a moment's notice. 



Wanted to Purchase.— Swans, Geese, Rare Pheasants, 
Antelopes, Indian Cattle, Kangaroos, Baboons, Monkeys* 
every description of Animals and Birds for prompt Cash.. 
Do not dispose of any duplicates whatever to any Zoological 
or Public Gardens, Amateur or others, until you have 
my refusal. 



Menagerie Wagon for sale, foreign make, three compartments, 
box wheels, suitable for Bears, Lions, etc. Price £20, no offers 



Samlgtta Jltota^ra JKajajme. 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



No. 9.— Vol. 2. 



LONDON, JANUARY, 1917. 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 



Important Notice. 



ALTERATION IN TELEPHONE NUMBER. 



On and after January 1st, 1917, 
AVENUE 4360. 



NOTICE. 

The subscription for Vol. II., 1916—17, is 
10/-, post free. If your name is not in 
the list on back page, kindly post 10/- without 
any delay. All subscriptions commence with No. 
1 of Vol. 2. Yearly Subscriptions only received. 
Specimen copies can be sent post free on receipt 
of twelve penny stamps. Subscribers not receiv- 
ing their Magazine should communicate at once 
with the Editor. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE. 

All Subscribers in Norway, Sweden, Den- 
mark, Spain, Portugal, Switzerland, Holland and 
United Statesi, who have not received their usual 
numbers, are requested to communicate at once 
with the Editor. They will in future receive the 
Magazine through the Office of Messrs. W. H. 
Smith and Son, Strand, W.C. 

* * * * 

By arrangement with Messrs. W. H. Smith 
& Son, 186, Strand, W.C, "Hamlyn's Menagerie 
Magazine" is on sale on the 16th of each month 
at the following Railway Stations : — 

Charing Cross (South Eastern and Chatham 
Railway). 

King's Cross (Great Northern Railway). 

Liverpool Street (Great Eastern Railway). 

St. Pancras (Midland Railway). 

Victoria (South Eastern and Chatham Rail- 
way). 

Waterloo (South Western Railway). 



DEATH OF Mr. A. E. JAMRACH. 

It is with very great regret that I record 
the death of Mr. A. E. Jamrach, of 180, St. 
George's Street, London, E., at midnight on 
New Year's night, in his seventy-second year. 
He was buried at Hampstead, Friday, 5th 
January. Mr. A. E. Jamrach succeeded to his 
father's business — the late Charles Jamrach — 
in 1801. There now remains of this remark- 
able family, Mr. William Jamrach, of Stoke 
Newington, Miss Jamrach and Messrs. Geo. 
and Jaky Jamrach. 

The late Naturalist was a fluent scholar, 
speaking some four languages, and an accom- 
plished gentlemen. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



THE PRESERVATION OF EXPIRING 
SPECIES. 

By F. Finn, B.A., F.Z.S. 

In the Deer Sheds, near the South Gate of 
the Zoo, can be seen a stag which, though healthy 
enough in himself, has the melancholy distinction 
of being one of a dying species — a specimen of 
Pere David's Deer (Elaphurus davidianus), which 
has now been at the Zoo for nearly a year. As 
far as appearances go, the beast is not prepossess- 
ing, and is a poor object in comparison with most 
of those most graceful creatures, the larger deer; 
indeed, only the Moose and the Reindeer excel 
him in clumsiness, for he has large feet, a long 
head carried low on a short neck", and the queer- 
est and ugliest antlers carried by any deer, with 
no brow-tine and an enormous backward branch 
which gives the effect of horns set on the wrong 
way round. These very peculiarities, however," 
give him an interest all his own, and he has 
other strange points as well — a tufted tail, longer 
than that of other deer, and quite as much like 
a donkey is; hair reversed all along the middle 
line of the neck and back, from poll to rump, 
and two' hair-whorbs on each side, one in the 



66 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



middle of the side of the neck, and the other below 
the withers, which are extraordinarily well- 
marked, and that on the neck shows a regular 
puncture in the centre as if from a stab with a 
stout skewer. 

Then the feet are peculiar, in being broad 
not from having particularly wide hoofs, as in 
the Reindeer, but from the wide separation of 
the toes, which,, at any rate in the fore-feet, show 
a connecting skin as in the Camel and Llama, 
so that the beast can almost be called web-footed; 
and the change of coat is unsurpassed in pecu- 
liarity by any of the deer family, and by few 
other beasts. In winter the colour is a stone- 
grey, with the fore-neck black and the legs and 
belly whitish; the coat is then close and sleek, 
and the beast looks particularly donkey-like. The 
summer coat is bright sandy-yellow, loose and 
untidy by reason of numerous long outstanding 
hairs, which remind one of a human head which 
needs the barber's attention. While in this coat 
the beast carries his horns, growing and dropping 
them in the grey dress; at least that is the case 
with the Zoo specimen. 

The dark shade on the throat and the light- 
ening on the underparts are not so noticeable in 
the yellow as in the grey coat, but in both a 
strong black stripe along the withers is a striking 
feature, emphasised in the grey dress by a bor- 
dering of a few large light spots. 

Some individuals of this species, like the 
Zoo animal, grow two sets of antlers in a year 
— a unique feature in the deer tribe. The Zoo 
animal is a quiet sluggish beast, and not so 
savage as most of the large deer when bearing 
horns, but the usual roll of the eye shows that 
it is spirit, not the will to do harm, that is, want- 
ing in him. 

The history of this species of deer is with- 
out a parallel in the world of beasts. Many years 
ago, the great French missionary, Pere David, 
who, like so many clerics, was one of the best 
of naturalists — far better than most of the scien- 
tifically-trained sort — saw, over the wall of the 
Chinese Emperor's hunting-park at Pekin, some 
animals which he thought were a new kind of 
Reindeer. He was soon able to send specimens 
to Paris, where it was found that, though not 
specially allied to Reindeer, the animals were 
certainly new, and as I have said above, of a 
very peculiar type. 

The remarkable point about their history is, 
however, that none have ever been found outside 
the old hunting-park. No doubt some Emperor 
with a taste for live curiosities — a very common 
hobby among monarchs, especially in the East — 
had procured the original stock on account! of 
their rarity and peculiar appearance, and thus 
preserved them; for there seems every reason to 
suppose that the race is completely extinct in a 
wild state. In its slow movements, tame spirit, 



and the very poor adaptation of its peculiar ant- 
lers for defence or attack, this deer must have 
had but a poor time in competition with the fierce, 
alert, well-armed stags of other species, to say 
nothing of wolves and other carnivorous foes. 
Its native haunts would appear to be in marshy 
places, as those at large in the Duke of Bed- 
ford's park at Woburn 'have been observed to 
take to the water in summer a great deal, in 
this respect, as in form resembling the Reindeer 
— at any rate the American race known as Cari- 
bou. Lydekker, who gives us this information 
in one of his books, also compares the running 
gait of the animal to that of a mule, but he does 
not seem to have spent as much time in observ- 
ing these unique animals as he might have done, 
for he omits, even in his description of the species 
in the British Museum Catalogue of Ungulate 
Mammals, to note .the difference betweejn the 
winter; and summer coats, the reversal of the hair 
along the middorsal line, and the curious and 
conspicuous hair-whorls. 

The Duke's herd of these unique deer, from 
which came the individual now at the Zoo, as a 
gift from His Grace, is indeed precious and wor- 
thy of all study, for its members are the last of 
the species known to exist, Only a few had been 
sent to' Europe from China when a calamity hap- 
pened which exterminated the Chinese stock; the 
walls of the park were breached, -and the deer, 
straying outside, were all killed and eaten by the 
hungry peasantry, to whom, of course, they were 
simply so much excellent venison. The Woburn 
herd, therefore, are the only living examples of a 
very distinct and peculiar race of beasts upon the 
earth, and, in case of any calamity befalling them, 
the species would join the sad company of the 
Quagga, the Dodo, and other well-known vic- 
tims of the stupidity of man. 

It is sheer stupidity which has brought about 
extinction in most cases; when a species is rare, 
it seldom seems to occur to anyone that its exist- 
ence is in danger, and when this idea does strike 
some official exponent of science, instead of 
doing his best to preserve the creature, as the 
old Emperor and the modern Duke have done in 
the case of the deer we have been discussing, 
his great idea is generally to exterminate it in 
the cause of science, as \ remarked some time 
ago in this Magazine. The fact can hardly be 
"rubbed in" too often, now that more serious in- 
terests than those of animals may be involved, 
when the intellectual classes, especially scientists, 
appear to be aiming at the supremacy formerly 
held in human affairs by the landed gentry. 

A good example was fhe case of the peculiar 
Bullfinch of the Azores (Pyrrhula murina). This 
species, which in both sexes has a dull plumage 
like that of our female Bullfinch, and is thus of 
interest either as a survival from the time when 
the beautiful distinctive colouring of the males of 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



nearly all other Bullfinches — most of them Hima- 
layan — had not been evolved, or as a case of a 
hen-feathered race, dualogues to "henny" game- 
fowl among our tame birds. An official scientist 
on a collecting fHp found this bird, as he con- 
ceived, in imminent danger of extinction, owing 
to the persecution of the fruit-growers, who found 
it a pest, as our own Bullfinch unfortunately is. 
He therefore made this a reason for getting all 
the specimens he could; but not long afterwards 
another naturalist, not an official this time, 
pointed out that it would be just as well to give 
the bird a chance, because another collector had 
since gone to the home of this unfortunate species 
and collected a lot more, so that there must still 
have been plenty left ! 

Then there was a quite recent case wherein 
a collector wrote quite a long paper on his visit 
to the haunts of the magnificent Ivory-billed 
Woodpecker, now apparently restricted to one 
district in Florida; but all he tells us about the 
bird itself is that he shot the only one he saw, a 
poor unmated specimen that might well have been 
the last of the race. It seems that in former times 
the Red Indians used to make coronets of the 
white beaks of this bird; it seems to me that 
thus to use a bird, when common enough, for 
decoration, is no sin, so I do not carp at women 
for wearing birds' plumage in their hats; but I 
do object to the action of naturalists, who should 
set an example, when they go about giving the 
final push to species already on the down grade. 

That some species must die out sooner or 
later is inevitable, no doubt, but there is no need 
to hurry the process. In America, where this 
sort of speeding-up has been unpleasantly in 
evidence, they have now taken measures to have 
birds adequately protected; I hope due care has 
been taken about exemptions, for the American 
scientist is in his way, as wholesale in his des- 
tructiveness as is the American milliner's hunter. 
It disgusted me to see that hundreds of Blue 
Robins and House Wrens were killed to investi- 
gate the contents of their stomachs in an agricul- 
tural research on the economic utility of birds; 
as no one ever accused these birds of harm, and 
every one knew they were insectivorous. Such 
slaughter is. I think, more stupid and barbarous 
than any wearing of feathers. A plume in a hat 
may, at any rate, set off a pretty face, or draw 
attention away from a plain one, but nothing can 
beautify columns of statistics. 

In Europe the same need for drastic protec- 
tive measures does not exist, the control by landed 
aristocracy operating as a whole in favour both 
of the preservation of native species and the in- 
troduction of others, as we may see in the pride 
of most owners thereof in their rookeries, and in 
the close association of the Fallow-deer, Swan, 
and Peacock, with the "stately homes of Eng- 
land." The up-to-date intellectual exclaims at 



the slaughter of Hawks, Weasles, and so forth, 
by gamekeepers, but as I admire pheasants more 
than such creatures, I have no complaint against 
the squire's keeper except when he brings about 
the destruction of such beautiful birds as the Jay 
and Magpie, which in small numbers have very 
little power for harm. 

It is in the transport of threatened species 
elsewhere, I believe, that we have the best hope 
of their preservation, and this has, I know, been 
recommended by American naturalists in some 
cases, notably by one of the most distinguished, 
Dr. Hornaday, in the case of Pere David's Deer. 

I should recommend the procuring of a few 
pairs of these to send to New Zealand and Tas- 
mania, if any of the stock are to be disposed of; 
and, if I were in the position of the Duke of 
Bedford, the guardian of this dying race of ani- 
mals, I should keep no other deer in my park, 
to give Pere David's Deer all possible chances. 
Of course, I do not wish to discourage the pro- 
tection of a vanishing species in its own haunts, 
but it must be borne in mind that the fact that 1 a 
species is rare shows that there are agencies 
operating against it in its home, which may not 
be found when it is transported to a new area. 

Thus, the Goldfinch, if not actually vanish- 
ing, is certainly not common in Britain now-a- 
days, in spite of the limitation of the activities of 
bird-catchers — compared with the Chaffinch and 
Greenfinch, indeed, it can really be called a very 
rare bird. Yet, when introduced into New Zea- 
land and Australia,, it took a new lease of life, 
and is one of the commonest birds in many parts; 
also it is as harmless as it is at home, it furnishes 
an interesting case to oppose to that of the rabbit 
and other introduced hT,iscrear.,ts who have 
brought discredit upon the transport of species 
abroad. 

The misdeeds of these are made the most of 
by professional zoologists who are almost univer- 
sally violently opposed to the shifting of species; 
indeed, they would for the most part rather see 
a species perish altogether than change its habi- 
tat, when of the collecting or museum school, 
for whom the geographical distribution of animals 
appears to be the only point about' living things 
worthy of study. The newer and now dominant 
laboratory or anatomical school have no interest 
in whole animals at all, alive or dead, being wholly 
wrapped up in dissecting and Darwinism; and 
neither school have either the knowledge or the 
interest justifying their control of the relations 
between man and the lower animals; both classes 
are no more fit to decide on the fate of any animal 
than a butcher is to run a dairy farm. 

We are promised many changes after the 
war; as a naturalist, I sincerely hope that there 
will be no further progress in zoology, in the way 
of the present professionalism. The real zoolo- 
gists, in my humble opinion, are sportsmen, fan- 



68 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



ciers, and those connected with them, because 
these are the only people who find interest and 
pleasure in living thingsi. I also suspect the 
"nature-lover,' who is generally a faddist, de- 
voted to the animals of his own country only, 
and blind to the beauty and interest of anything 
that is not a zoological compatriot, and fear the 
establishment of "nature reserves," which must 
ultimately interfere with farming, and seem to me 
only justifiable when a harmless species is 
threatened with total, not local, extinction. 



Some Observations on the Hairy 
Armadillo in Captivity. 

By B. W. Tucker. 

For those whoi have a taste for keeping 
curious animals, there are few more suitable pets 
than an Armadillo. Its tameness, its quaint and 
interesting ways, its hardiness, and the ease with 
which it is fed are all very mcuh in its favour, 
and it is a pity that these sigular creatures are 
not better known and more frequently kept by 
animal-lovers in this country. 

The protective armour of the Armadillo is 
quite unique in the animal world. People seeing 
one for the first time frequently compare its 
"shell" to that of a Tortoise, but a somewhat 
closer examination will show that it is formed on 
an entirely different plan. It is composed of a 
number of small, bony plates set close together 
in the skin, so as to form a hard shield over the 
upper part of the body. This is divided into two 
main portions, separated by a series of movable 
transverse bands near the middle of the back. 
These are made up of parallel rows of plates, simi- 
lar to those on the rest of the body, but each of 
them is separated from its neighbour by a soft, 
fiegible skin. This allows the animal much 
greater freedom of movement, and in some species 
it even stretches sufficiently to' enable them to roll 
up into a ball, hedgehog fashion. The bands 
vary from thre to thirteen according to the species 
and several kinds gain their names from the num- 
ber which they usually possess — as, for example, 
the Three-banded Armadillo, the Six-banded Ar- 
madillo, and so on. The two portions of the 
armour which are thus separated are respectively 
known as the scapular and pelvic shields. These 
reach sufficiently far down the animal's sides to 
afford protection to the underparts, which are not 
provided with regular armour. In the Hairy Ar- 
madillo these shields are edged with large, blunt 
teeth, which the animal has been observed to use 
for killing snakes and other reptiles, which it 
literally saws in pieces before making a meal of 
them. In addition to this, there tea small, rough- 
ly triangular shield on the top of the head, while 
the tail is similarly protected by numerous bony 



scutes. The under parts, as already mentioned, 
are practically unarmed, and are covered by a 
soft skin, sparingly clothed with long, coarse 
hairs, which give it the appearance of a plucked 
chicken. 

The Armladillo is one of the Edentata or 
"Toothless mammals,' but the name, in this case, 
is peculiarly inappropriate as the animal is well 
provided with teeth. Curiously enough the Giant 
Armadillo (Priodon gigas), of Brazil, possesses a 
larger number than any other mammal, with the 
exception of certain members of the Cetacea. In 
point of fact quite a number of the Edentates 
have teeth, but they are always of a very simple 
type and are absent from the front part of the 
jaw. 

The species which it is proposed to describe 
in this article is that known as the Peludo or 
Hairy Armadillo (Dasypus villosus), which is one 
of the commonest and, at the same time, one of 
the most frequently imported of the whole family. 
The Peludo is about 22 inches long from the 
snout to the tip of the tail, and is a remarkably 
heavy animal for its size. The English name is 
derived from the numerous hairs which spring up 
between the plates of the armour, and give a 
rather curious effect, reminding one somewhat 
of a tortoise with bristles growing out of its shell. 
It is a native of Argentina. The foregoing notes 
refer more especially to this species, but they may 
be applied more or less to all Armadillos, for the 
general arrangement of the armour is very similar 
in all members of the Dasypodidae. 

In captivity the Armadillo should be given 
plenty of space. It will do very well in a small 
rabbit-hutch, but in such a home its kuaint and 
amusing ways cannot be properly appreciated, 
and it loses half its interest. 

The subject of these notes is kept in a good- 
sized enclosure, with wooden sides about a yard 
high. The Armadillo is no climber, and it is not 
necessary to put any lirework or netting over this.* 
It is very important, however, that the run should 
have a strong bottom, for these animals are most 
persistent burrowers, and thei rstrength is aston- 
ishing. The specimen in the writer's possession, 
for example, when digging in the earth, will 
remove stones and bricks almost as large as him- 

* It should be explained that on one side of the run the 
bank in which the animal has his burrow reaches up to 
within about IS inches of the top. For a long time the 
writer believed that the Armadillo could not even get over 
this, but on November 24th, a day or two after the above 
was written, he finally managed to struggle over. Nothing 
was known of his escape until, about 7 p.m., he was 
brought back by a villager, who was under the impression 
that he had caught an escaped tortoise. He had been seen 
several times during the day, so could only have been at 
large for a very short time. He had, however, travelled a 
considerable distance, and was captured on the highroad 
quite a quarter of a mile away. He seems none the worse 
for his escapade, but a considerable alteration will have to 
be made in the height of the wall on the burrow side. 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



69 



self, apparently with very little effort. The dan- 
ger of his escaping by this means is obviated, 
however, by having- the run paved. 

The bottom of the enclosure is covered over 
with soil, and on one side there is a bank, in 
which the animal has a burrow where he spends 
a good deal of his time. Such an arrangement 
has a great advantage over the hutch or box 
which is usually provided for these creatures to 
sleep in. It is not only far more natural, but the 
constant burrowing gives the Armadillo plenty 
of healthy exercise, and helps to keep him in good 
condition. The earthen walls of the burrow are 
strengthened by an inner support: of wood and 
bricks. This prevents the animal from under- 
mining them and causing them to collapse, which 
would soon happen if this precaution were not 
taken. The roof is similarly constructed of strong 
Avooden boards, which are covered by a layer of 
soil and planted over with turf. In the middle is 
a shallow box, filled with earth and planted with 
grass. This serves the purpose of a lid, and at the 
same time at a short distance it can hardly be 
distinguished from the rest of the turf. On either 
side of this lid is a handle, by means of which 
it ma be removed in order to see the interior of 
the burrow. Unfortunately the writer has never 
been able to observe the Armadillo burrowing in- 
side, as he will never do SO' when the lid is off, 
and immediately stops work if it is removed after 
h ehas started. There are constant opportunities, 
however, of watching him digging outside, in 
the bank at the side of the burrow or in corners 
of the run. The fore feet are armed with five 
very long and powerful claws specially formed for 
the purpose, and the rapidity with which a large 
hole will be made, even in hard ground, is quite 
astonishing. 

The "Arma," as he is familiarly called, is 
to some extent nocturnal in his habits, and spends 
a good part of the day asleep in the burrow. He 
usually comes out for a short time about 10 or 11 
o'clock to be fed, and then retires again. Some- 
times he shows himself for a few minutes during 
the afternoon, but, as a rule, he is not seen 
again, in the summer, until about 6 o'clock in the 
evening, and rather earlier in the winter. At 
these times he generally remains out until after 
nightfall. It is during this part of the day and 
also during the early hours of the morning that 
he is most active, though he is always very lively 
when he is out. At such times he frequently oc- 
cupies himself by digging numerous holes in the 
bank and spares no effort to make the run thor- 
oughly untidy. These holes have to be stopped 
up every day, although on each following morn- 
ing they will be there again in exactly the same 
position. It would be difficult to say what their 
purpose is, for the never go in for more than a 
few inches, and no attempt is ever made at exca- 
vating a new burrow. Apparently he makes them 
in mere exuberance of spirits — a kind of "joy of 



his heart." The "Arma" seems to be seized with 
periodical fits of this burrowing craze, which may 
last for almost any length of time, from a week 
or two to several months. After such bouts he 
often turns his attention to alterations in the 
interior, and leaves the outside undisturbed for a 
time. 

(To be continued.) 



F. C. SELOUS. 

It is reported unofficially that Captain F. C. 
Selous, D.S.O., the famous South African ex- 
plorer and big-game hunter, has been killed in • 
action in South-east Africa. Captain Selous joined 
the Legion of Frontiersmen a year ago, and was 
mentioned in despatches by General Smuts and 
awarded the Distinguished Service Order for 
services in the East African campaign. Captain 
Selous was generally understood to be the origi- 
nal of Allan Quatermain, the hero of the Rider 
Haggard African romance. 

Francis Courtenay Selous was born in 1852., 
educated at Rugby, and afterwards passed a year 
in Germany with the object of learning the lan- 
guage and German business methods. As his I 
father was president of the London Stock Ex- 
change favourable openings in the business world 
of London were available for young Selous, but 
the bent of his inclinations was early apparent, 
and perhaps nothing would have availed to alter 
it.. He was one of those typical Englishmen who 
gravitate towards a life of sport and adventure 
as surely as the dislodged stone rolls down hill. 
Selous was one of the most courageous and suc- 
cessful hunters of big game that ever lived, but 
his energies were far from being restricted solely 
to sport. A born naturalist, he derived nearly as 
much pleasure from the acquisition of rare birds 
or butterflies as from securing handsome tro- 
phies of the chase. The British Museum contains 
numerous specimens of African mammals obtained 
by Selous at the cost of who' shall say how much 
toil and hardship. The Museum at Capetown also 
is enriched by his interesting collections. 

In September, 1871, Selous commenced his 
famous career as hunter, explorer, and naturalist, 
landing at Algoa Bay, aged 19, with a capital of 
£400. He lost no time in penetrating into the 
interior, and during one of his early expeditions 
in Griqualand came very nearly to losing his life. 
While hunting giraffes — which he then saw for 
the first time — he became lost, and for nearly 
four days and as many nights was entirely without 
food and water. A strong constitution enabled 
him to throw off the effects of this trying ex- 
perience, and soon afterwards he entered Mata- 
beleland and sought King Lobengula's permission 
to shoot elephants. Lobengula laughed at him, 
saying he was "only a boy," but the desired 



70 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



authority being- obtained, the "boy" justified him- 
self by killing on foot in tlhe course ofl his first 
three seasons no fewer than 78 elephants. A 
Hottentot hunter named "Cigar" initiated him 
in the perils of elephant-hunting, and seems to 
have been a reliable and considerate companion. 

The outfit which satisfied young Selous would 
scarcely be deemed adequate by modern hunters 
of big game. He was accompanied by a solitary 
Kaffir "boy," who carried his blankets and spare 
ammunition, Selous himself taking along a four- 
bore muzzle-loading rifle, a bag of powder, and 
20 bullets of 4oz. each. For food he and Cigar 
depended on their rifles and what Kaffir corn they 
could procure., These so-called rifles were in 
•reality smooth-bore duck-guns of the cheapest 
description, carrying round bullets, but although 
they "kicked" terribly Selous found them as well 
suited for killing- elephants as the best express 
rifles. 

Selous made a trip home in 187S 1 , but the 
spring of the following- year found him once again 
hunting in Matabeleland. Later on he crossed the 
Zambesi into- the Batonga country. An expedi- 
tion to Mashonaland followed, and during it 
Selous experienced one of the narrowest of his 
many escapes from dangerous big game. He was 
hunting elephants on horseback, had wounded 
one, and the somewhat sluggish horse he rode 
was chased and caught by the infuriated animal. 
Selous was dashed heavily to the ground. When 
he recovered his senses the first objects that met 
his eyes were the pillar-like hind legs of the ele- 
phant. He was actually underneath the enraged 
beast, which was kneeling- and searching for its 
enemy. Needless to say, Selous lost no time in 
escaping from such a dangerous proximity and, 
wonderful to relate, neither he nor the horse was 
much the worse. Durig this trip he nearly lost 
oxen, horses, and everything he possessed from 
thirst, no water being obtainable for a period of 
about four days. Selous's "bag" of big game 
from 1877 to 1880 inclusive consisted 1 of 548 head, 
among them being 20 1 elephants, two white and 
10 black rhinoceroses, 100 buffaloes, 13' lions, and 
18 giraffes. In the spring of 1881 he went home. 
His fame as a hunter and naturalist was now well 
established, and papers on different species of 
African mammals which he read before the Zoo- 
logical and other scientific societies attracted much 
attention. Selous was recognised as an ebcep- 
tionally careful and reliable observer — a faculty 
in which some of the greatest African hunters 
have been singularly deficient — and his investi- 
gations set at rest sundry disputed points regard- 
ing the species and habits of certain of the African 
big game. 

About this time Selous entertained thoughts 
of settling to more peaceful avocations, but the 
call of the wild was too strong, and for many 
years after 1882! his life as hnuter and explorer 
was only varied by occasional visits to the old 



country. During an expedition undertaken in 
1888 he was treacherously attacked by natives of 
the Mashukulumbwi tribe. From his safari of 
twenty-five only seven escaped unhurt; twelve 
were killed outright, and Selous found himself 
stranded with only the clothes he wore, a rifle, 
and four cartridges. It was indeed a terrible 
situation in which he was then placed — alone in 
the heart of savage Africa, surrounded by hostile 
natives, and separated by a wide expanse of diffu, 
cult country from friendly ones. For three weeks 
he struggled pluckily along, sleeping on the bare 
ground without blankets, enduring all kinds of 
privation and hardship. He was providentially 
saved to reach the country of Sikahenga, a Baton- 
ga chief who protected him. 

When Mashonaland was occupied by the 
British Selous rendered valuable services as guide 
and in connection with the advanced guard. The 
road which so greatly facilitated operations was 
constructed under his supervision, and his per- 
sonal influence with the neighbouring warlike 
tribes was largely responsible for their quiescence. 
At this time Selous's reputation stood deservedly 
high. Cecil Rhodes had a great opinion of him, 
and there is no doubt that had he wished it Selous 
might have occupied an important post in the new 
Administration. But he did not wish it; possibly 
the habits of mind acquired during so many years 
of solitary life had unfitted him to co-operate with 
others. 

In January, 1910, Selous undertook an ex- 
pedition to the Bahr-el-Ghazal province of the 
Sudan with the object of procuring complete 
specimens of the Sudanese eland for the Natural 
History Museum at South Kensington. The trip 
however, proved unsuccessful. 

Although his name is associated more es- 
pecially with Africa, Selous's hunting- expeditions 
were by no means confined to the Dark Continent 
He was keen to explore any country in which rare 
trophies might be obtained. Twice (1897-98) he 
visited the Rocky Mountains and secured really 
good heads of mule-deer and as good specimens 
of wapiti as are to be had in those regions now-a- 
days. Some ears previously he was in Asia Minor, 
where he shot several of the handsome wild goats, 
animals which are exceedingly shy and not very 
numerous. 



B0ST0CK AND WOMBWELL'S 
MENAGERIE IN LEEDS. 



CHRISTMAS, 1916—17. 



The publicity given in "The Yorkshire Post" 
yesterday to the circumstances in which a plot 
of land in the centre of Leeds has been let to 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



71 



Bostock and Wombwell's Menagerie has provoked 
considerable comment locally, and further inquir- 
ies emphasise the extraordinary position which 
has arisen as a result of various people working 
at cross-purposes. In a fuller explanation of the 
matter than we were able to give yesterday it may 
be stated that some weeks ago Messrs. Bostock's 
proposed visit to Leeds came before the Chief 
Constable (Mr. W. Burns Lindley), and also be- 
fore the Watch Committee. That authority en- 
dorsed the Chief Constable's view that fo Trea- 
sons connected with air-raid precautions it was 
not desirable that the show should visit the city 
in these times. It was unwittingly stated yester- 
day thhat the market authoriies then approached 
the competent military authority for the city, and 
after meeting with a refusal from that quarer, 
placed the matter before the Ministry of Munitions 
and obtained the Ministry's sanction for the hold- 
ing of the show. This is not borne out by a 
closer investigation of the facts, and it would 
seem that no blame attaches to any of the Cor- 
poration departments, nor have the Ministry of 
Munitions any desire to override the local authori- 
ties in any decision they may have come to in 
the matter. 

Holding the view that they would be able to 
satisfy military and police requirements with re- 
gard to lighting restrictions, the promoters of the 
show approached the Ministry of Munitions to 
ascertain whether a visit to Leeds was likely to 
affect the output of munitions. The negative reply 
they received appears to have been somewhat 
freely translated into an official sanction to hold 
the show. At any rate, armed with this docu- 
ment, the commenced negotiations for the renting 
of a suitable "pitch in Leeds, and a contract was 
eventually signed whereby they agreed to occupy 
the vacant plot of land behind the wholesale meat 
market in New Pork Street, for one month, at a 
rental of £50. Messrs. Bostock and their agents 
were solely responsible for the negotiations with 
the Ministry of Munitions and the Military Au- 
thorities, and the Corporation and its servants had 
no share in the matter until the contract came 
to be signed. 

HOW THE CONTRACT WAS SIGNED. 

The circumstances in which this took place 
are best explained by Mr. Herbert Yeadon, the 
Markets Superintendent, who stated yesterday 
that it was a mistake to say that either the Mar- 
kets Committee or he himselm had approached 
the Military Authorities or the Ministry of Muni- 
tions in the matter. So far as he was concerned, 
he had acted throughout not as the Markets Sup- 
erintendent, but as the agent of the Development 
Committee, who in October, 1904, adopted a 
resolution empowering him to let! this land. The 
land itself is a plot that remains over from cer- 
tain street improvements and demolitions of slum 
dwellings, carried out some years ago. It has 



constantly been let for the purpose of fairs, and 
before the lighting restrictions came into force 
frequently brought in a profit of £300' or £400 a 
year. What happened io the present case was 
this : On October 28 Mr. Yeadon received a letter 
from Mr. Wesley Petty, who wrote on behalf of 
Mr. ,. H. Bostock, asking for an interview for 
the purpose of discussing the occupation of the 
site by the menagerie. On November 1 Mr. Yea- 
don visited the Chief Constable, who said that 
he did not feel that he ought to take the responsi- 
bility of the show coming fo Leeds. He therefore 
referred Mr. Yeadon to Colonel Gordon, R.F.A. , 
the Competent Military Authority in Leeds. On 
the following day Mr. Wesley Petty and Mr. E. 
H. Bostock called upon Mr. Yeadon at the Mar- 
kets Office, and were duly referred by him to Col. 
Gordon, Mr. Petty remarking that he felt sure 
that he could come to terms with Colonel Gordon 
respecting lighting arrangements, etc. Mr. Yea- 
don heard nothing more fore some time and, he 
says, was under the impression that the matter 
had dropped. On November 30, however, he was 
rather surprised to receive an intimation from 
Mr. Wesley Petty that permission for the show 
to be held had been obtained from the Ministry 
of Munitions. Mr. Yeadon wishes it to be made 
clear that he had taken absolutely no action what- 
ever in regard to approaching the Military Au- 
thority or the Ministry of Munitions; all that he 
did was to see the Chief Constable on the matter, 
and then, on his suggestion, to refer Mr. Petty 
and Mr. Bostock to the military authority. On 
December 14, Mr. W. C. Burns, agent for Messrs. 
Bostock and Wombwell called upon Mr. Yeadon 
and produced a letter signed by Colonel Gordon 
authorising the show to be held. On the strength 
of this authorisation terms were arranged with 
Messrs. Bostock and Wombwell for the occupa- 
tion by them of the land from December 2& to 
January 20 for a sum of £50 l , subject to military 
and police control as to lighting, etc. On t he 
following day Mr. Yeadon wrote to the Chief 
Constable informing him of what had been done. 

As Mr. Bostock had not arrived in Leeds 
yesterday it was impossible to obtain the text of 
the communications that have passed between 
him and the Ministry of Munitions, but we under- 
stand that he holds two letters which support him 
in his action. One of these, the letter referred 
to by Mr. Peadon as coming from Colonel Gor- 
don, is stated to contain Colonel Gordon's en- 
dorsement of the view expressed by the Ministry 
of Munitions that the show will not interfere 
with the output of munitions, and the other, ex- 
pressing the same view, is a letter written by Mr. 
Montagu, the late Minister of Munitions, to Mr. 
Bostock direct. It should be explained that the 
Government Department concerned has power to 
prevent the holding of fairs, etc., if it is t'hought 
that the will interfere with work on munitions, 
and their views on the matter are entirely apart 



72 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



from such local considerations as to* lighting res- 
trictions. Allusion is made by Mr. Yeadon to the 
part played by Mr. Wesley Petty in the negotia- 
tions. Apart from business associations, Mr. 
Petty is an old friend of Mr. Bostock, and the 
latter wrote to him asking for information as to 
what land was available in Leeds as a place for 
the show. It was on purely personal grounds 
that Mr. Petty helped Mr. Bostock to carry his 
negotiations through, and he had not anticipated 
any opposition, seeing that the show had already 
visited such centres as Plymouth, Southampton, 
Portsmouth, and the London area. 



THE RESPONSIBILITY OF LOCAL 
AUTHORITIES. 

The outcome is naturally resented by the 
Chief Constable, who, in the course of an inter- 
view yesterday, said 1 his action was solely dic- 
tated by the interests of the city generally. Al- 
though the risks from aircraft may be remote, 
he holds strongly to the opinion that no risk, 
however remote, ought to be taken if it can be 
avoided, and he believes the public will support 
him in this. He intends bringing the matter be- 
fore the Watch Committee at their meeting to- 
day, and he anticipates that the Committee will 
support him. "I still think," he said, "that the 
Corporation ought to break this contract, so as 
to prevent the show being held. I regard it as 
seriously as that." 

As will- be seen from our advertisement col- 
umns, the show is advertised to be held "by per- 
mission of the Ministry of Munitions." The legal 
adviser of the Ministry of Munitions was seen in 
London yesterday and gave the following explana- 
tion : — "We were asked by Mr. Bostock to say 
whether he had any objection, under the Defence 
of the Realm Act, to this show being held, and, 
of course, as it did not come under the heading 
of 'fairs,' we said we had not. In a word, we did 
not regard the matter as really coming within our 
purview at all. But what Mr. Bostock apparently 
had done has been to transform a negative reply 
into a positive statement that we have sanctioned 
this exhibition. I shall indeed be glad for you to 
make it known that this is not the case — that we 
have in no way interfered with the rights of the 
local authorities. The police and the others con- 
cerned are still free to exercise whatever powers 
they possessed before any application was made 
to us in the matter. Neither the police nor the 
military authorities are in any way hampered by 
anything that has taken place between the Minis- 
try of Munitions and the promoters of this ex- 
hibition. So far as we are concerned, they are 
at liberty to exercise their legal rights in this 
matter to the fullest extent." 



GENERAL NOTES. 

THAT the arrivals in London from South Africa 
have been 2l Zebras, 2. Chacma Baboons, with 
a very few small birds. 

THAT the arrivals in London from Calcutta have 
been 1 Adult Tigress, 400 Rhesus Monkeys, 3 
Entellus Monkeys, 1 Python, 300' Parrakeets, 7 
Pintail Nonpareils. 

THAT the arrivals in London from South Ameri- 
ca have been a few Marmozets and Parrakeets, 
3 Armadillos, 1 tame Ringtail Monkey. 

THAT the arrivals in Liverpool from New York 
have been 14 American Rattlesnakes, 23 mixed 
American Snakes; from West Africa, 2 im- 
ported Lions, with some 20 1 African Monkeys. 

THAT the arrivals is London from the Continent 
have been 21.000 Budgerigars, 1 Chimpanzee, 
2 Agoutis, 12 uarious Monkeys. 

THAT a new Horned Toad (Phrynosoma) has 
been presented to the Zoological Society's 
Gardens, Regents Park, by Dr. Spurrel, who 
secured it dhilst in Texas some time back. 

THAT a rare double-tusk Narwhal, considered 
to be the record-freaking specimen of the 
world, is a feature of the National Collection 
of Heads and Horns at the New York Zoologi- 
cal Park. It was captured yy a whaler in the 
Arctic seas. The tusks are nearly 8 feet long, 
and the animal must have yeen 25 feet long. 

THAT a message from Budapest, published in 
the New York "World," states that the only 
remaining sea lion in the Dresden Zoological 
Gardens successfully rebelled recently against 
German war conditions. 

The sea lion, like every one else in Ger- 
many, was on short rations. Apparently he 
was so disgusted by the cutting down of his 
usual three square meals of fish a day that he 
escaped from his pond and flopped his way 
across country to Carola Pond, half a mile 
away. 

A fishmonger leases Carola Pond, and in 
it raises carp for the market; but he has not 
been to market for several days, for the sea 
lion did not leave even a baby carp. 

The sea lion has been caught and returned 
to his own pond, and a guard placed to see 
that he does not go dining out again. The 
fishmonger is suing the zoo for £50 damages. 

THAT Charlie, the Kordofan Giraffe, was found 
dead in its stall last week at the Society's Gar- 
dens, Regents Park. 

A post mortem shewed that death was due 
to fatty degeneration of the heart. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



Printed by W. J. Hasted & Son, (T.U.), 306 Mile End Road London, E. 



KENNET VALLEY FISHERIES, 

HUNGERFORD, BERKSHIRE. 



PRINCIPALS— Major Morse and Sir Edgar C. Bochm, Bt., F.R.G.S. 
TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS— "Fisheries, Hungerford," 
STATION— Hungerford, G.W.R., 1| miles. 
All communications to be addressed to the Secretary, Eddington Lodge, Hungerford, Berks. 
The Kennet Fishery is situated a s hort distance above the town, and is laid out with a view 
to growing fish under natural conditions for sporting purposes. 

Purchasers can obtain from us special quotations for the class of stock required, and the 
numerous testimonials received assure us that clients will be satisfied. 
Expert advice is given on all matters concerning fishings, etc. 

FOOD AND PLANTS. 

Most kinds of useful and ornamental aquatic or w aterside plants can be supplied at short 
notice. We also recommend most highly our specially prepared fish food. Its constituents are 
carefully selected, and giving the maximum feeding value, avoids sameness of diet; and, being 
buovant in the water, unlike most other foods, the fish learn to take it on the surface. 
Price 14 lbs. 7/6; per cwt. £1/7/6. 

Also freshwater Snails, Shrimps, Insecta, etc. Prices as per quantity. 

Below is a Price List of our Trout, which is subject to slight variations. A few d ays notice 
is always necessary to net up and prepare the fish for their journey. 



PRICE LIST. 



YEARLING TROUT. 



Salmo Fario (Brown Trout) 4 in minimum ... 

3 in. 
Salmo Iredeus (Rainbow Trout) 5 in. minimum 
,, ,, ,, ,, 4 in. ,, 

3 in. 



Per 100 

£ s. d 
1 7 6 
1 3 



Per 1,000 

£ s. d. 

12 

9 15 

15 

10 

8 15 



TWO YEAR OLD TROUT. 



Brown Trout, 9 in. minimum ... 
8 in. 
,, 7 in. 
Rainbow Trout, 7 to 9 in. minimum 



Per 100 
£ s. d. 
6 18 
5 3 

3 13 

4 12 



Per 500 
£ s. d. 
33 
24 
16 15 
21 



THREE YEAR OLD TROUT. 



Per 100 
£ s. d. 
13 5 
11 

8 15 

9 10 



Brown Trout, 12 in. minimum 

„ ,, 11 in. „ 

,, lOin. „ 

Rainbow Trout, 10 to 12 in. minimum 

TROUT FRY— Brown and Rainbow at current prices. 

Special quotations for local deliveries, larger orders or sales by average size, and larger troul 
up to 18 inches. 

Address— THE SECRETARY, 

EDDINGTON LODGE, 

HUNGERFORD, 

BERKSHIRE. 




LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 



List of Subscribers, for Vol. II., 1916—17. 

The Earl of Lonsdale, Lowther, Penrith. 

The Lord Rothschild, Museum, Tring. 

The Countess of Jersey, Middleton Park, Bices- 
ter. 

The Lady Julia Follett, The Woodside, Old Wind- 
sor. 

The Hon. E. S. Montague, M.P., Bridge Street, 
Cambridge. 

Sir John Bland Sutton, 47, Brook Street, Gros- 
venor Square. 

Sir Edgar Boehm, Bentsbrooke, North Holm- 
wood, Surrey. 

Major Atherley, Croft Castle, Kingsland, Here 
fordshire. 

The Clifton Zoological Gardens, Bristol. 

The Royal Zoological Gardens, Dublin. 

Messrs. Jennison and Co., Belle Vue, Manchester. 

The Director, Royal Zoological Society, Natura 
Artis Magistra, Amsterdam. 

The Superintendent, Zoological Gardens, Alipur, 
Calcutta, India. 

The Director, Zoological Gardens, Tokyo, Japan. 

Robt. D. Carson, Zoological Gardens, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., U.S.A. 

Dr. Penrose, Zoological Gardens, Philadelphia, 
Pa., U.S.A. 

E. A. Le Souef, Zoological Gardens, Perth, Aus- 

tralia. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Copenhagen. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Rotterdam. 
Dr. F. D. Baker, National Zoological Park, 

Washington, D.C. 
Richard Arnold, Tower House, Leigham Court 

Road, Streatham. 
Lieut. Thomas Buchan, Hepburn, Haddington, 

East Lothian. 
Dr. M.Burnshaw, 51, Cazenove Road, Stoke New- 

ington. 

F. E. Blaauw, Gooliust, St. Graveland, Hilver- 

sum, Holland. 

Wm. Shore-Baily, Boyers House, Westbury, 
Wilts. 

Dr. John K. Butter, M.D., Highfield House, Can- 
nock, Staff's. 

G. Chapman, High Street, Birmingham. 
Mrs. Cotton, The Mount, Bishopstoke. 
F. W. D' Evelyn, San Francisco. 

W. Edmunds, Coombe Farm, Langton Matra- 

vers, Dorset. 
H. Earl, Newgate House, Cottingham, E. Yorks. 
David Ezra, Kydd Stre,t, Calcutta. 
Guy Falkner, Belton, Uppingham. 
Herbert A. French, St. Margaret's, Downs Park 

West, Bristol. 
Linwood Flint, Waterford, Maine, U.S.A. 
R. Gilpin, Zoological Gardens, Washington, U.S. 
Miss Hall, 76, Adelaide Road, Hampstead, N.W. 
Y. E. Harper, Calcutta. 



Miss Howman, 6, Essex Grove, Upper Norwood. 

Rev. Hemsworth, Monks Fryston, S. Milford. 

W. J. Henning, Hillside, New Maiden. 

T. Hebb, Brooklea, Downs Road, Luotn. 

W. A. Harding, Fliston Manor, Cambridge. 

Homes Zoological Society, 318, Keith and Perry 
Buildings, Kansas City, U.S.A. 

Lieutenant T. Buchan-Hepburn, Letham, Had- 
dington, Scotland. 

H. Ide, Elm Lawn, Eden Street, Kingston-on- 
Thames. 

William Jamrach, 65, Lordship Lane, Stoke New- 
ington, N. 

Mrs. E. Jordan, Gorthie, Wokingham. 

Mrs. Johnstone, Burrswood, Groombridge, Kent. 

Alderman J. D. Riley, J. P., 33, Gun Street, 
Spitalfields. 

W. King, 23, High Street, Whitechapel. 

C. F. Leach, Vale Lodge, Leatherhead. 

P. L. Morgan, Westfield, Elgin, Scotland. 

Dan Mason, Maisonette, Broadstairs. 

John W. Marsden, Thornhurst, Tewit Park, Har- 
rogate. 

G. J. B. Meade-Waldo, Stonewall Park, Eden- 
bridge, Kent. 

R. Scott-Miller, Greenoakhill, Broomhouse, Scot- 
land. 

Mrs. C. Prioleau, Loxwood House, Billinghurst. 

L. Pullar, Dunbarnie Cottage, Bridge of Earn. 

Monsieur Pichot, Boulevard Haussman, Paris. 

A. Reeve, Hall-by-the-Sea, Margate 

Ernest W. Robinson, Liscombe, Leighton Buz- 
zard. 

Gerald Rattigan, Cornwall Gardens, S.W. 

Warren Bruce Smith, Aubrey Lodge, Emsworth, 
Hants. 

G. de Southoff, Leysin, Vaud, Switzerland. 

Dr. W. O. Stillman, 287, State Street, Albany, 
N.Y., U.S.A. 

H. S. Spencer, 109 Barcombe Avenue, Streatham 
Hill. 

Dr. Steel, Londonderry. 

W. H. St. Quinton, Scampston Hall, Rillington, 
York. 

W. R. Temple, Ormonde, Datchet, Bucks. 

W. D. Trickett, Lench House, Waterfoot. 

A. Carr Walker, Tyrie, West Park, Leeds. 

W. Wightman, Estate Office, Aynhoe, Banbury. 

G. L. de Waru, Les Lilas, Leysin, Vaud, Swit- 
zerland. 

Walter Winans, Claridge's HoteJ, Brook Street, 
W. 

Captain Woodward, Mayville, Kingston-by-Sea, 

Brighton. 
E. Wuiron, 7, Rue Theophile Gautier, Neuill), 

pres Paris. 
Messrs. Willsons, 37, New Oxford Street, W. 
A. S. Yates, Bishops Sutton, Alresford, Hants. 



p= 



[ 




Hamlynis 
Menagerie 
Magazine. 



No. 10.— Vol. 2. 



FEBRUARY, 1917. 



Price One Shilling 



CONTENTS. 



LALI BANADOOR AND BABY ELEPHANTS (Illustration) 

NOTICE 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

DEATH OF Mr. JOHN HAMLYN 

DR. RICHARD L. GARNER'S RESEARCH EXPEDITION TO GORILLA LAND 
SOME OBSERVATIONS ON THE HAIRY ARMADILLO IN CAPTIVITY 

A CHAT ABOUT LION-TAMERS ... 

OUR RARE LITTLE FRIEND, THE WILD CAT 

FUTURE OF THE MUSCOVY DUCK 

GENERAL NOTES 



73 
74 
74 
74 
75 
76 
76 
77 
78 
80 






6= 



yQc 



£ 



Telegrams: Hamlyn, London Docks, London, 



Telephone : 4360 Avenue 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East. 




Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station 
Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence fiye minutes walk. 
0.0. payable at Leman Street, East. Cheques crossed "London County <S> Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TERMS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from me of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back, TELEPHONE. — Orders can be received on telephone, 4360 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night, LETTERS.— Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication, DELIYERY.— Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 

For the arrivals from abroad during the past month. Full Particulars are given 



General Notes.' 






From Calcutta. 

The S.S. " City of Bombay " will arrive about the 1st March 
with the following stock: — 

1 Elephant, male, 4£ feet 

1 „ ' female, 4£ feet 

(Photograph of these two animals with 
Keeper appear on page 1.) 

1 Large Pigtail Ape 

1 Tiger Cub, female, 10 months 

400 Indian Rhesus Monkeys 

Some.Rhesus, extra size 

5 IndianTythons 

100 Indian Shamahs 



Prices on 

ipplication. 



The S.S. "Media 



will arrive about 24th March, with the 
following stock : — 



31 Indian Pythons, measuring from 10 ft. 

to 20 ft 

1 Tiger, female, adult 

8 Pandas, very rare 

220 Monkeys 

28 Impeyan Pheasants 

802Chukar Partridges 



South African consignments are : — 

5 Zebras 

4 Blessboks 

4 Chacma 

1 African Leopard, adult 



Prices on 
application. 



Prices on 
application. 



To arrive from New York. 

4 Sea Lions, from San Francisco 

The only importation for 1917. 



Can offer American Snakes, harmless 
American Rattlesnakes, poisonous, very fine 

Armadillo, interesting pet 

Mona Monkey, ,, , 

Jew ,, ,, ,, 



each 


£2 


ii 


£3 


for 


£3 


ii 


£2 


ii 


£2 



Mangabey Monkey, interesting pet 
Vervet Monkey ,, ,, 
Rhesus Monkey ... 

Dog-faced Baboon 

Drill Baboon 

Mandrill Baboon 

6 Californian Quail 

3 Canadian Tree Porcupines ... 
60 „ Grey Squirrels ... 



for £3 



£2 

£6 

„ £1C 

from £20 upwards. | 

for 

... each 70/6 
20/6 



Blue and White Foxes, 
condition 



2 Blue, 2 Whites, all in flrst-clas 
each £1C 



These are at present deposited with Messrs. Jennison, 
Belle Vue, Manchester, who will be pleased to shew the 
to intending purchasers. They will not be sold one penny 
less than £10 each. 



The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at The Zoologi- 
cal Society's Gardens, Regents Park, London : — 
1 Alligator, 6 feet each 

1 ,, 5Jfeet 

3 Giant Toads (Bufo marinus) 

5 Small Tortoise, Brazil 

2 Adorned Terrapins 

1 Heloderm Lizard, poisonous 



Wanted to Purchase.— Swans, Geese, Rare Pheasant 
Antelopes, Indian Cattle, Kangaroos, Baboons, Monk 
every description of Animals and Birds for prompt Cas 
Do not dispose of any duplicates whatever to any Zoologic 
or Public Gardens, Amateur or others, until you 
my refusal. 



/ Menagerie Wagon for sale, foreign make, three compartments 
box wheels, suitable for Bears, Lions, etc. Price £20, no offe 



Ferrets. 

Warning to Dealers in Ferrbts. — No Ferrets she 
ever be sent to any dealer in Montauban, France, unless full; 
paid for in advance. My experience has been that when Fe 
arrive in France, some trivial excuse is made to refuse the cob 
signment, with a view to a considerable reduction in price. 



Hamlgtts Jltatajjme JEagajte. 

EDITED BY JOHN D. HAMLYN 



No. 10.— Vol. 2. 



LONDON, FEBRUARY, 1917. 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 




LALI BANADOOR, a Nepauli attendant, in charge of the first two Baby 
Elephants, male and female, to arrive here for the last twenty years. 

These interesting pets are on the " City of Bombay," due here the first 
week in March. Other particulars on cover. 



74 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



Important Notice. 



ALTERATION EN TELEPHONE NUMBER. 



On and after January 1st, 1917, 
AVENUE 4360. 



NOTICE. 

The subscription for Vol. II., 1916— 17, is 
10'/-, post free. All subscriptions commence with 
No. 1, Vol. 21. Yearly subscriptions only received. 
Specimen copies can be sent post free on receipt 
of twelve penny stamps. Subscribers not receiv- 
ing their Magazine should communicate at once 
with the Editor. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE. 

All Subscribers in Norway, Sweden, Den- 
mark, Spain, Portugal, Switzerland, Holland and 
United States, who have not received their usual 
numbers, are requested to communicate at once 
with the Editor. They will in future receive the 
Magazine through the Office of Messrs. W. H. 
Smith and Son, Strand, W.C. 

* * * * 

By arrangement with Messrs. W. H. Smith 
& Son, 186, Strand, W.C, "Hamlyn's Menagerie 
Magazine" is on sale on the 16th of each month 
at the following Railway Stations : — 

Charing Cross (South Eastern and Chatham 
Railway). 

King's Cross (Great Northern Railway). 

Liverpool Street (Great Eastern Railway). 

St. Pancras (Midland Railway). 

Victoria (South Eastern and Chatham Rail- 
way). 

Waterloo (South Western Railway). 



DEATH OF Mr. JOHN HAMLYN. 

THE OLDEST DRAPER IN THE WORLD. 



Born at Martock, Somerset, May 2nd, 1815. 

Died at Shepton Mallet, Somerset, Feb. 4th, 1917. 

Aged 101 years 9 months. 



The "Shepton Mallet Journal." Friday, Feb- 
ruary 9th, wrote as follows : — 



"DEATH OF OUR CENTENARIAN. 

The death occurred about midnight, on Sun 
day, of Mr. John Hamlyn, of Leg Square, Shep- 
ton Mallet, the oldest resident in the county, 
and for many years a very well known character 
in the town. Mr. Hamlyn was born at Martock, 
Somerset, on May 2nd, 1815', and would there- 
fore have completed his 102nd year in a few 
months' time. His association with Shepton 
Mallet commenced when he was a boy. He had, 
and still has, distant relatives in the town. 
When he was about fourteen or . fifteen he 
became an apprentice to the first Mr. Richard 
Burt, who carried on business at that time in the 
house now occupied by Mr. Ashford, in the 
Market Place, then a very different place from 
what it is now. He had a vivid recollection of 
men whose names only live now in parochial 
records, but who' then figured prominently in 
the town, the Wickhams, Purlewents, Morgans, 
Hardistys, and the senior generations of other 
families still represented. After completion of 
his apprenticeship he went to Taunton, and set 
up in business, and prospered. He went later 
to Windsor, and with a growing family, and 
tempting offers made him, he sold a good busi- 
ness there, and proceeded to the Metropolis, 
where he occupied important positions in one 
or two of the leading firms. Family law suits 
and loyalty to relatives reduced him to a different 
position from what he had occupied. When he 
returned to Shepton Mallet many years ago to 
reside with his sister, Mrs. Coombs, widow of 
a leading local draper, he was possessed of means 
sufficient to last out an ordinary life. He has 
for some years been more or less dependent on 
the goodwill of relatives and friends. He had 
a most happy temperament and placid dis- 
position. Till just before Christmas, though 
visibly failing, he was still able to manage his 
own marketting, and was almost daily to be 
seen about the town to the wonder of all, going 
about safely, unaccompanied as a rule. His 

memory and intellect were highly preserved. 
To a visitor recently he gave the message to be 
ipassed on to others as a rule of living, " Be 
steady and frugal, and never forget to thank 
God for all his mercies." 

The funeral took place yesterday (Thursday) 
afternoon. Mr. John Hamlyn leaves one son, 
Mr. John Daniel Hamlyn, the famous Naturalist 
and Wild Animal Importer, who is a Councillor 
of the Borough of Stepney and a Guardian of 
the Stepney Union." 



The Trade Journal, "Men's Wear," February 
10th :— . 

"The trade will regret to learn of the death 
of one of its oldest members, Mr. John Hamlyn, 
of Shepton Mallet, who passed away on Monday 
in the 101st year of his age. With the exception 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



75 



that his sight failed him a little, his faculties 
were unimpaired, his hearing and memory being 
especially good. In habits he was strictly tem- 
perate in all good things, and almost a total 
abstainer from strong drinks, and he was a non- 
smoker. He was apprenticed at Shepton Mallet 
in 1827 at the oldest drapery establishment in 
the town (a firm that has only changed hands once 
since that time), and at the conclusion of his term 
commenced in business for himself in Taunton 
as a tailor, hatter, outfitter, and woollen draper, 
and this he carried on successfully for a number 
of years. He then came to London for a few 
years, being engaged in accountancy, but soon 
returned to Somerset to spend his time in quiet 
country pursuits in the town where he was appren- 
ticed 88 years ago. On the celebration of his 
centenary in May, 1915, Mr. Hamlyn was tlhe 
recipient of many congratulations and birthday 
greetings. One, in particular, gave very great 
pleasure to the old gentleman — a message from 
the King, showing a kindly interest in Mr. Ham- 
lyn 's welfare. It is of interest to record that Mr. 
Hamlyn was christened at Martock nine days 
before the Battle of Waterloo." 



I now wish to thank the many Councillors, 
Guardians, and others, for their expression ofi 
sympathy during this most trying time. The 
Guardians of the Stepney Union were particularly 
thoughtful and kind in expressing a hope that I 
might be spared for as long a period to continue 
my useful public work. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN. 



Dr. Richard L. Garner's Research 
Expedition to Gorilla Land. 

The New York "Sun" gives the following 
particulars concerning this most extraordinary 
man : — 

"Dr. Richard L. Garner, undeterred by his 
seventy years of age and the perils of sea 
travel in war time, is now on his way back 
to Central Africa to study our backward cousin 
the ape. 

" He proposes to secure moving pictures 
of gorillas and chimpanzees at home with their 
families; entertaining one another; calling, 
moving about to visit one another or to search 
for food, in groups, usually on their hind legs, 
man fashion, when they do not know they are 
being observed; one taking a nap, perhaps, on 
the peculiar and ,someti'mes comfortable bed 
these beasts prepare for themselves. Natural- 
ists believe that gorillas sometimes try a bed 
during the day before occupying it at night. 



" Incidentally, Dr. Garner will try once more 
to bring back a live gorilla. 

"Live gorillas are obtained by native hun- 
ters, never by a white man, and they must be 
caught when they are young or not at all. A 
full-grown worilla will kill himself before sur- 
rendering. When cornered he uses himself up 
in his fierce fighting; if caught in a trap he 
will beat himself to death in an effort to escape. 

" Susie, a female chimpanzee, brought over 
in 1910, whom Dr. Garner hopes to replace, 
went to a school for deficient children in Phila- 
delphia, and learned more quickly than any of 
them. She died of summer complaint in 1913." 

The first I ever heard of Dr. Garner was 
whilst collecting Chimpanzees land Gorillas in 
the Sette Cama district, French Congo Seaboard, 
in 1904. One morning when in my compound on 
the river beach, a native runner handed me a let- 
ter from that gentleman who it appears was 
living up in the Egowe district, stating there were 
Chimpanzees, Gorillas and Jiggers there in abun- 
dance. The latter insect I did not require, for 
there were plenty at Sette Cama. The celebrated 
cage was then, I believe, on its way to his lonely 
habitation. We, on the coast, often wondered 
how the Doctor would "fix" up on its 'arrival. 
There were many doubters as to whether Gorillas 
and Chimpanzees would ever approach Garner's 
cage. Some of the old coasters, well versed in 
Gorilla ways, declared that if a family of those 
intelligent animals discovered the Doctor inside 
the cage, there would be the greatest Animal Act 
that was ever perpetrated in the annals of Natural 
History. They would calmly lay siege to* the 
structure — Doctor and all — with the natural re- 
sult that the Doctor with cage would be ruthlessly 
destroyed, and scattered in a thousand pieces to 
adorn the Congo forest, with a lasting tribute 
to Garner's devotion to his beloved Apes. 

To have lived in his lonely clearing as he 
lived, far away from other white men, was a won 
derful feat of endurance. 

His companions, when I was out there, were 
two good sized Chimpanees, whom he had trained 
to attend to his various wants. One actually 
went to the river daily for water. The other col- 
lected firewood and fruits for the household. 
Such an extraordinary trio have never been seen 
before, and certainly never will again. However 
Dr. Garner can leave the pleasures of New York 
for that district again, I cannot understand. 

It was a very great pleasure to meet him in 
London some years ago> on his leaving on one 
of his Congo journeys. It was an eventful dinner. 
I believe a " Prehistoric" one. He proved a won- 
derful conversationalist. The Doctor opened out 
with the soup, somewhere about seven, and at 
eleven o'clock still held the company in rapt at- 
tention with his flow of eloquence in recounting 



76 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



his numerous adventures. Not one of the com- 
pany had said a word during the evening. I 
trust he will forgive me mentioning one of the 
pleasantest evenings I ever spent in my life. 

May he have every success in his new ven- 
ture, but at seventy years of age it is very doubt- 
ful. 

JOHN D. HAMLYN, 



Some Observations on the Hairy 
Armadillo in Captivity. 

One other point in connection with this is 
worthy of notice. When he retires to sleep he 
invariably digs into the soil at the bottom of the 
burrow, and completely covers himself up under 
.several inches of earth. In this condition he will 
remain for hours at a stretch, and when he finally 
wishes to come out into the open again he has 
literally to dig himself out. One would imagine 
that breathing, in such circumstances, would be 
a matter of considerable difficulty , but it does not 
appear to cause him any inconvenience. It would 
be interesting to know if Armadillos behave in 
this way in a wild state. 

In the matter of food, these creatures are 
almost omnivorous and feed readily upon meat 
(raw or cooked), chicken's heads, bones, rats, 
mice, birds, snakes, frogs, liards, bread, fruit, 
bread-and-milk, potato peelings, biscuits, and so 
on. The present "Arma" happens to be an ex- 
ception to this rule, for he refuses almost all 
food of a vegetable nature. Once a day he is 
given a saucerful of meat, which may be either 
cooked or raw, and a good bowl of milk. Ap- 
parently he merely takes the latter because he 
likes it, for it is generally believed that Arma- 
dillos in a wild state rarely if ever drink. The 
above diet is varied, when possible, by a fowl's 
head or a bone. 

When he first arrived the "Arma" would eat 
nothing but bread-and-milk, but he has since 
abandoned this in favour of a meat diet, and it is 
now difficult to persuade him to take the bread- 
and-milk at all. He also shows a marked liking 
for certain sweets, especially cream chocolates, 
when obtainable. 

On one occasion the experiment of introduc- 
ing a rat into the run was tried. The Armadillo 
instantly scented the creature, and began to trot 
round and round the enclosure, nose to the ground, 
in search of it. Having finally located the rat 
crouching in a corner, he made a sudden rush 
at it, but the animal managed to dart 1 to one side 
and escape. Then followed a, chase which lasted 
for some minutes. An Armadillo can move with 
considerable speed, but he is so match for a rat 



in the matter of agility, and consequently the 
latter was able to keep well out of reach. The 
Armadillo seemed to follow his prey entirely by 
scent, for his eyes were kept fixed on the ground. 
More than once he seemed to lose the creature 
entirely, but only for a moment. A few hasty 
sniffs here and there, and he was off again. At 
last the victim paused for a dinut'e in a corner 
of the run. The "Arma" was on it in an instant. 
Jumping upon the animal from quite ten inches 
away, a most curious procedure to witness on the 
part of a heavily built and rather clumsy-looking 
animal, he crushed the life out of it with several 
well directed blows of his powerful fore-paws. 
He continued to worry it for some minutes after- 
wards, until, having finally satisfied himself that 
it was quite dead, he picked up the mangled body 
in his mouth, and carried it into the burrow. 
An hour or two later the skin was found lying in 
front of the entrance hole with almost every par- 
ticle of flesh cleaned out of i1j. 

It is interesting to notice that the teeth were 
not used at all in killing the animal. The claws 
are the Armadillo's chief weapons both of offence 
and defence. When handled they will never bite, 
but they will frequently kick so violently that it 
is almost impossible to hold them. 

The chief interest of the above experiment lay 
in its demonstration of the Armadillo's method 
of capturing and killing small animals in an en- 
closed space, but in the open it would be almost 
impossible for it to catch such creatures in this 
way, on account of their superior agility. In a 
wild state, therefore, it relies chiefly upon stealth 
for the capture of its prey, creeping up behind 
its victims when they are feeding or otherwise 
occupied, and suddenly flinging itself upon them 
as in the above instance. In addition to small 
mammals of this kind, its natural food consists 
of worms, insects, eggs, frogs, young birds, car- 
rion, etc. The carcases of the wild oxen on the 
Pampas, which are killed for the sake of their 
hides, are quickly devoured by the Armadillos, 
which dig burrows under the bodies and feed upon 
them from below. They are not at all particular 
as to their diet, and when animal food is not 
obtainable the will eyen content themselves with 
leaves and grass. 

(To be continued.) 



A CHAT ABOUT LION-TAMERS. 

" Fisher's Almanac and Annual" is respon- 
sible for the following : — 

There is a romantic glamour about our Christ- 
mas and Tombland Lairs which were in all their 
glory half a century ago, with their "Lion Kings" 
and Aztecs, their fire-eaters and sword-swallow- 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



77 



ers, their giants and dwarfs, and " finny, monsters 
of the deep" all going - strong. In those days the 
menageries and lion-tamers were "nine days' won- 
ders" for Norwich folks; and the thrilling scenes 
at the "Wild Beasts" never failed to draw big 
houses. The most popular tamer of his time was 
Macomo at Manders' menagerie. He was be- 
lieved to be a Zulu, and had been a sailor; and he 
was certainly the hero of many daring exploits 
in the lions' den. During a show at Yarmouth 
Fair in I860, he was performing with half-a-dozen 
lions and lionesses, when one of the beasts at- 
tacked him. The trigger of Macomo's pistol 
caught in the animal's mane and went off, with 
the result that one of the spectator's lost an eye, 
for which £150 had to be paid as compensation. 
At the Christmas Fair in the following year the 
tamer was attacked by a young lion and was 
severely mauled before the fierce brute could be 
beaten off. 

Some time after that Macomo' had another 
narrow squeak, for he was knocked down by a 
lion in the den, and escaped with the loss of a 
finger. In 1867 we find him in Norwich again 
putting lions and tigers through their paces; and 
he finished his long and adventurous career in 
safety, with many medals and thrilling memories. 

His successor, McCarthy, was not so lucky. 
He had lost an arm whilst performing with lions 
'at Myers' circus, in the early sixties, and in 
1872, at Bolton, he was knocked down by an 
angry beast, and lost his life. 

Then there was the daring Delmonico, the 
famous lion trainer at Wombwell's great men- 
agerie — who subsequently went into the theatrical 
business. 

Another notable performer was Sandalla, a 
black man, who specialised in the training of' 
wolves and hyenas at Day's menagerie, and had 
an exciting "turn" in the shape of a boxing match 
with a black bear. It was a study in "black and 
white" to see the black trainer and black bear 
pummelling ealh other in a whitened cage. And 
even in these modern days, the courage of the 
hild beast trainer — and the very riskiness of the 
business — furnish the biggest attraction of the 
travelling menagerie. 

Also that on November 5th, 1788, a large 
tiger, worth over £200 which was exhibited at 
the "Bear" Inn in Norwich, broke loose, and 
after devouring two monkies, was again secured. 
The tiger died soon after, from a brass collar and 
chain which he had swallowed, having gangreened 
within him. 



OUR RARE LITTLE FRIEND, THE 
WILD CAT. 

By Felix J. Koch. 
Ever see a real American wild cat? 



No — no pun intended — not some poor, stray 
Tabby, who's escaped from a home where cuffing 
and starving and so on was the rule of the day, 
until the cat .preferred to take chances and go off 
and wander — but a real wild cat, a wild animal 
quite as much as bear, tigers, lions, what you 
would, are? 

Chances are that, unless you happen to live 
in a wild cat country, away off from the ordinary 
paths of men, you didn't; for wild cat are hard 
to take alive, nor do they thrive well in captivity, 
and so comparatively few the zoos or travelling 
menageries which are possessed of one. 

Interesting creatures, however, these wild 
cat's; the real wild stock that has come down from 
the same ancestors to which Pussy, on our hearth, 
or the Tom-cat on the fence must, eventually, 
trace his remotest lineage. 

As a matter of fact, the wild cat, both the 
American and the European type, and, inciden- 
tally, our domestic cat as well, belongs to> the 
great family of Lynx. 

In sections the American wild cat is even 
known as the "bay lynx" — the Felis rufa, or 
Felis montana, of the scientist. It is, normally, 
two and a half feet long and should tip the scale 
at somewhere less than twenty pounds. 

The head of the wild cat is round, the body 
is slender, the legs are long, and the soles of the 
feet are naked, the hind feet, curiously enough, 
being partially webbed. The ears are large and 
nearly triangular, and are tipped with coarse hair, 
which are shed in the summer. The throat, in its 
turn, is surrounded with a ruff of long hair. The 
tail is short and slender and turned up at the 
end. 

The wild cat's general colour is of a yellow- 
ish brown or bay; there is a line of darker brown 
rising from the shoulders to the tail, and circular 
longitudinal stripes of a similar shade upon the 
back. The sides are spotted with dark brown. 

The American wild cat is very extensively dis- 
tributed, being found in all the less settled por- 
tions of North America, from Latitude 60i N. to 
the Tropics, where Man has not made it extinct. 
In the warmer parts ol the United States, es- 
pecially, it was abundant, so much so that it 
became a nuisance, thanks to its depredations 
upon the eggs and poultry of the plantations. It 
usually chooses the wooded steeps of hills, or 
thick, swampy forests for its haunts, and, given 
the chance, it feeds on rabbits, eggs, squirrels, 
partridges, fish, and, indeed, almost any small 
quadruped it can master, or on any bird it can 
manage to seize. Thanks to this, the hens, ducks, 
geese and turkeys of the farm yard fall victims 
to its veracity, wherefore Friend Farmer, these 
many years, has been after him with his gun. 

In days of old, when those birds were still 
abundant in the States, one student of the wild 



78 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



cat relates, it would follow the flocks of wild 
turkeys on their way and, learning the direction 
in which they were bound, would proceed by a 
short cut to the path they would be apt to take. 
There it would crouch low and, when one came 
withhin its reach, it would bound upon it and seize 
it. 

Despite this element of sagacity and skill, 
the wild cat is a very shy animal, and when delib 
erately hunted displays great address in eluding 
both hunters and dogs. It is very timid, yet it 
makes a stout defence when driven to extremity. 

Again, the wild cat is a very tolerable swim- 
mer and has not the usual aversion of others of 
the cat family to water. 

The usual home of this cat is in the hole of 
a tree, or in some space beneath a log. The 
mother makes a bed of moss and leaves, where 
she cradles her little ones, from two to four such 
at a time. 

Cunning as are the kittens — the picture is 
of one such at the big Zoo at Memphis — all at- 
tempts to domesticate them, even where taken 
at birth, well-nigh have proven fruitless and the 
cat in the photograph will snarl and snap even 
at the good keepers who feed and tend her, draw 
aloof from them and attempt to snap or scratch 
should any of them get within reach. 

Whether our domestic cat is descended from 
the American wild cat, or from her close kin, 
the European wild cat, or whether all look back 
to one common ancestor (as cannot be denied, 
for remains of cat animals are found even in 
fossil form), is matter of dispute among scientists. 

The great Goodrich inclines to the latter 
view, and he tells some interesting things as re- 
sult of his studies of the European wild cat. This 
wild cat is found not alone in Europe, but in Asia 
and Africa, and it is sometimes to be chanced 
upon in the United States. 

When America was first discovered, it ap^- 
pears, domestic cats, tame or wild, were not found 
here; all our domestic cats, as well as this es- 
pecial type of wild ones, are the descendants of 
those brought hither by Europeans. 

Again, the wild cats of Europe are either 
the descendants of the original races that have 
continued untamed from the beginning, or of 
domesticated cats that have wandered from their 
homes, and, living apart from Man, have relapsed 
into barbarism. It is said that the wild and the 
tame cats, in their wanderings, sometimes meet, 
and when this is the case, the females of the 
tame breed are well treated by the savage cats; 
but the males are rudely set upon and sometimes 
torn in pieces. Again, wild and tame cats will 
sometimes mate, the young being of the curious 
sort known as tiger cats. 



Some naturalists however, hold that the 
European wild cat is a distinct species from all 
other sorts, since the tail is shorter and more 
bushy than that of the domestic cat. 

Howsoever, certain it is that the wild cat of 
Europe is rather large and more robust than the 
tame breed. The head is triangular, and has 
a savage aspect; especially when the animal is 
irritated. The fur is long, soft and thick; the 
back, sides and limbs are grey, darker on the 
back and paler below, with a blackish, longitu- 
linal stripe along the middle of the back and in- 
numerable paler curved ones on the sides. The 
tail is played with light grey and black, the tip 
of the latter colour. 

"As is the case with many other animals — 
the ox, dog and horse," one student tells us, "so 
it is w ith cats. The wild ones are nearly all of 
the same hue; while the domestic ones, as is well 
known, are white, black, grey and yellow, of 
mingled shades and colours." 

In Europe, too, the wild cat is a very shy 
animal, chiefly nocturnal in its habits. It lurks 
in woods and thickets, and preys on hare, squirrel 
and birds of various kinds. Four or five hundred 
jears ago it was quite common in England, but 
it has long since been extirpated there, though 
common enough, still, in France, Germany, Rus- 
sia and Hungary, up to, say, fifty years ago. 

Which wild cat, then, may have fathered the 
race of our domestic cats, it is purely guesswork 
to say; howsoever, cats of the domestic sort seem 
to have been companions of Man since the very- 
dawn of time. 

Egypt had its domestic cats; the embalmed 
remains of these are so old that some authorities 
think the Egyptians the first to tame cats. The 
old Romans had the cat; thus with most the early 
European peoples, elsewhere — and we have the 
cat with us to-day. 

Tabby, Maltese, Angora, whatsoever, she's 
as much a pet as of use, and few the homes, the 
world over, that are considered complete unless 
possessed of some favourite pet cat. 



FUTURE OF THE MUSCOVY DUCK. 

By F. Finn, B.A., F.Z.S. 
(Continued from No. 6, October, Page 47.) 
But all this, one may say, has nothing to do 
with laying, and on the evidence given the Mus- 
covy Duck seems to be a rearing, rather than a 
laying, bird, just like a goose or turkey. That is 
true, and until a few weeks ago I had never heard 
of Muscovies as "egg-machines," which are the 
pressing need in the poultry world now-a-days. 
But a few weeks ago, in the" Feathered World," 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



79 



there was quoted an account from a local news- 
paper of a strain of these ducks in the hands of 
a farmer, which produced extraordinarily large 
broods; hatches of seventeen and eighteen being 
described as common, while one "old veteran" 
had brought off twenty-one ! It is obvious that 
there are some good laying Muscovies to be 
found, and so it was not surprising to read in 
subsequent issues of the paper that Tn Australia 
Muscovy Ducks were kept for laying (in spite 
of the presence out there of Indian Runner Ducks 
and Leghorn Fowls), so that our countrymen 
"down under" have been carrying out their motto 
of "Advance Australia" even in such a little out- 
of-the-way department as the breeding of Mus- 
covy Ducks. When these birds are taken up as 
layers here, we may expect to see some liveliness 
introduced by their competition with high-laying 
common ducks and with fowls. Meanwhile they 
offer a way out of the difficulty which a corres- 
pondent of "The Poultry World" stated the other 
day. He wanted, it seems, "to have it both 
ways," and farm ducks that would lay well and 
be saleable for table. He was told that he had 
better specialize on table ducks rather than try 
to make a small-bodied laying breed serve both 
purposes, his ambition being "almost impossi- 
ble" of achievement. 

The Muscovy Duck,- however, prevents it 
from being quite impossible, for by crossing the 
drake of this species with ducks of the common 
kind, you can raise large birds — which have the 
superior flavour of the common duck — from quite 
small stock. Although the common ducks of 
India are not "Runners," which come from the 
countries much further east, they are not bigger 
than those birds, and yet I have killed hybrids 
between these small ducks and the Muscovy 
which weighed over six pounds each, drake and 
duck, and they had simply foraged for their food 
on and about a large pond without getting any 
regular feeding, Hume, in his "Game Birds of 
India," also says that in the Straits Settlements 
people make a practice of rearing these hybrids 
for the table, and it is also done in some parts 
of France, where these "mule" ducks are known 
as "Mullards" — a combination of "mulet" and 
"mulart," I suppose. 

Although laying and pairing freely, these 
hybrids are barren; their eggs are green, but of a 
different shade from those of the common duck; 
the eggs of the Muscovy are white. They are, 
it m ust be remembered, more apt to fly than even 
the pure Muscovy, which they resemble in shape, 
though rather favouring the common duck in 
colour. 

The reverse cross — Muscovy duck and com- 
mon drake — is much less well known, but more 
resembles the common duck in shape, differing, 
however, in the size of the sexes somewhat as in 
the Muscovy duck. This is a disadvantage when 



the birds are being reared for table, but by mak- 
ing the cross in this way one gets the advantage 
of having the Muscovy ducks to sit on the eggs 
and rear the young, while one is spared the trouble 
of keeping the big, coarse, and often ill-behaved, 
Muscovy drake. He, for his part, is ready enough 
to "take up with" common ducks, but his mate 
is not inclined to tolerate the advances of the or- 
dinary drake unless she has been accustomed to 
him when young; for, whatever poultry-book 
writers think — and they all seem to make a point 
of either ignoring or abusing Muscovies — the 
birds themselves think they are superior to the 
common kind ! 

It is this continued abuse, no doubt, which 
has led to the relegation of such a useful bird to 
the background; Lewis Wright, in his justly- 
celebrated poultry-book, was in the forefront of 
the attack; but he could not have known much 
about these birds, as he describes the plumage 
as looking as if half the feathers had been moulted 
and the other half were ready to fall out. I never 
saw a specimen like this myself, and with their 
rich contrasts of green-black and white, and bare 
scarlet faces, these birds are considered by most 
people ornamental, in spite of their heavy make 
and lazy habits. The bare face, by the way, 
though a most striking point in the species, and 
a very useful one, enabling the veriest beginner 
in poultry to recognise it immediately, is not 
developed till some time after the birds are full- 
fledged, though their long broad tails and erectile 
crests will always distinguish them from black- 
and-white varieties of the common duck. When 
a duck's "hair stands on end" when it is alarmed, 
you may know it for a Muscovy. It must be re- 
membered that they have no relationship to the 
ordinary ducks beyond the fact of both belonging 
to the same family of birds, but are a distinct 
species, like the wigeon or the sheldrake. 

Thus it is not surprising that they have such 
different habits in some ways; and it is these 
peculiarities that draw down upon them the abuse 
of "experts," just as the goat is always abused 
because it is not a sheep, and the donkey because 
it is not a horse ! Muscovy ducks have their 
faults, of course; the drake is sometimes savage, 
as in the case of one which Wright records as 
bullying a Dorking cock, and in that case his 
strength makes him formidable, as also when 
he takes to irregular love-making, a vice from 
which the common drake, after all, is by no means 
free. 

Also the power of flight and instinct 1 of nest- 
ing high up may cause disappointment if the 
duck "steals her nest" somewhere hp in a roof 
or a hollow tree, when eggs are not easily col- 
lected; but, of course, a clipped wing puts a stop 
to this. Old birds — and Muscovy ducks arc long 
lived — are also extraordinarily tough; but eo one 
need eat an old one, as the age is so readily indi- 



80' 



HAMLYN'S MENAGERIE MAGAZINE. 



cated by the bare red face, whereas in the case 
of common ducks a patriarch may be foisted on 
one unhetected. It is true that the young Mus- 
covy duck is too long and lanky to please the 
poulterer; but 1 all those I have seen have just 
taken "pot luck" and not been "forced" at all 
with high feeding; the flesh is all right, and the 
hybrids are of the right stamp for the table, or 
the practical French would not breed them. 

Generally a drake will mate with several 
ducks, but some will be contented with one, like 
their old bird at the Zoo, which has been there 
eight years and has been very groggy of late, al- 
thodgh he still sires a few ducklings, in spite 
of his mate being his own daughter, another 
disadvantage. He is a true wild South American 
bird, all black except for white patches on the 
wings, and with even the bare face blaok, a 
point which his sons by a tame Muscovy duck 
have inherited; it would not, however, be a good 
point to encourage in breeding, as the red face 
of the tame strain is so much handsome and more 
distinctive. 



GENERAL NOTES. 

THAT the arrivals in London have been some 
Budgerigars, 3 Mandrills, 20 mixed Monkeys, 
7 Canadian Porcupines, 60 Grey Squirrels, 1 
White Crane, 1 White-necked Crane, 15 Mon- 
gooses, 1 Red Teguexin, 1 Eenegal Parrot 
(rose variety). 



THAT the arrivals in Liverpool have been a few 
Monkeys from West Africa. 



THAT the Prince of Monaco has proposed to es- 
tablish in the Pyrenees, Alps Auvergne, Corsi- 
ca and Algeria, a number of large parks as 
preserves after the model of Yellowstone Park 
in America. 



THAT Captain Lord Lucas, a former President 
of the Board of Agriculture, who was killed 
in France last November, has bebueathed to 
the Hon. T. G. Grenfell lands in Norfolk and 
an annuity of £250 in order that the uroperfy 
should be kept as a preserve for birds. 



THAT Bostock's Italian Circus is now touring 
in India. It opened in Calcutta with great 
success. 



THAT visitors to the Zoological Gardens in 
1916 numbered 1,084,249, an increase of 25,521 
as compared with the previous ear, and the 
receipts for admission at the gates amounted 
to £24,542— £1,159 more than was taken in 
1915. 



THAT two leopard cubs, male and female, re- 
cently captured in the South-West Protector- 
ate, have been sent to England to General Lukin 
for presentation to the King. 



THAT the "Daily Mail" has the following:— 

"How the murder of a Chinese conjurer 
was revealed and the alleged murderer indenti- 
fied through the actions of an intelligent mon- 
key belonging to the dead man is related by 
the 'Singapore Free Press,.' 

" Resting in a Malay hut, after a perform- 
ance on a rubber estate near Taiping, the con- 
jurer was attacked, killed, and robbed, the body 
afterwards being dragged out and buried. The 
murder apparently was witnessed by the mon- 
key, which took refuge in the rafters. 

"Later a European walking some distance 
from the hut was surprised by a monkey com- 
ing towards him and pulling at the leg of his 
trousers. He tried to drive the animal away 
by kicking it, but it persisted in clawing at his 
legs and then trotting a little way ahead and 
looking back to see if it was being followed. 

" Finally the man followed the monkey to a 
mound of freshly turned earth, which it began 
to scratch up. The man informed the police, 
who dug up the soil and found the mutilated 
body of the monkey's master. 

" Suspicion fell upon a Malay, who, on 
being brought up at the police station with a 
number of other men, was immediately attacked 
with the greatest fury by the monkey, which 
was with difficulty prevented from doing him 
serious injury. The Malay's guilt has yet to be 
established by the court." 



THAT according to the "Daily Sketch," San- 
ger's well-known circus is to be disbanded until 
the end of the war. the Elephants and Camels 
will be let out on hire for ploughing. 



THAT on and after April 2nd all parcels — live 
stock and otherwise — must be sent prepaid on 
the railways of Great Britain. 



Printed by W. J. Hasibd & Son, (T.U.), 306 Mile End Road London, 



KENNET VALLEY FISHERIES, 

HUNGERFORd BERKSHIRE. 



PRINCIPALS— Major Morse and Sir Edgar C. Bochm, Bt., F.R.G.S. 
TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS— " Fisheries, Hungerford," 
STATION— Hungerford, G.W.R., 1| miles. 
All communications to be addressed to the Secretary, Eddington Lodge, Hungerford, Berks. 
The Kennet Fishery is situated a s hort distance above the town, and is laid out with a view 
to growing fish under natural conditions for sporting purposes. 

Purchasers can obtain from us special quotations for the class of stock required, and the 
numerous testimonials received assure us that clients will be satisfied. 
Expert advice is given on all matters concerning fishings, etc. 

FOOD AND PLANTS. 

Most kinds of useful and ornamental aquatic or w aterside plants can be supplied at short 
notice. We also recommend most highly our specially prepared fish food. Its constituents are 
carefully selected, and giving the maximum feeding value, avoids sameness of diet; and, being 
buoyant in the water, unlike most other foods, the fish learn to take it on the surface. 
Price 14 lbs. 7/6; per cwt. £1/7/6. 

Also freshwater Snails, Shrimps, Insecta, etc. Prices as per quantity. 

Below is a Price List of our Trout, which is subject to slight variations. A few d ays notice 
is always necessary to net up and prepare the fish for their journey. 



PRICE LIST. 



YEARLING TROUT. 








Per 100 


Per 1,000 




£ s. d. 


£\ s. d. 


Salmo Fario (Brown Trout) 4 in minimum ... 


17 6 


12 


.i ». »> ,> 3 in. ,, 


1 3 


9 15 


Salmo Iredeus (Rainbow Trout) 5 in. minimum ... 


1 14 3 


15 


» ,. 4 im „ 


14 9 


10 


,, ,, „ ,, 3 in. „ 


1 


8 15 


TWO YEAR OLD TROUT. 








Per 100 


Per 500 




£ s. d. 


£ s. d. 


Brown Trout, 9 in. minimum ... 


6 18 


33 


,, „ 8 in. ,, 


5 3 


24 


„ 7 in. „ 


3 13 


16 15 


Rainbow Trout, 7 to 9 in. minimum ... 


4 12 


21 


THREE YEAR OLD TROUT. 




Per 100 
£ s. d. 


Brown Trout, 12 in. minimum 




13 5 


,, 11 in. ,, 




11,0 


,, ,, 10 in. ,, 




8 15 


Rainbow Trout, 10 to 12 in. minimum 




9 10 


TROUT FRY — Brown and Rainbow at current prices. 






Special quotations for local deliveries, larger orders or sales by average size, and 1 


irger trout 



up to 18 inches. 

Address— THE SECRETARY, 

EDDINGTON LODGE, 

HUNGERFORD, 



BERKSHIRE. 



LIST OF SUBSCRIBERS. 






List of Subscribers, for Vol. II., 1916—17. 

The Earl of Lonsdale, Lowther, Penrith. 

The Lord Rothschild, Museum, Tring. 

The Countess of Jersey, Middleton Park, Bices- 
ter. 

The Lady Julia Follett, The Woodside, Old Wind- 
sor. 

The Hon. E. S. Montague, M.P., Bridge Street, 
Cambridge. 

Sir John Bland Sutton, 47, Brook Street, Gros. 
venor Square. 

Sir Edgar Boehm, Bentsbrooke, North Holm- 
wood, Surrey. 

Major Atherley, Croft Castle, Kingsland, Here- 
fordshire. 

The Clifton Zoological Gardens, Bristol. 

The Royal Zoological Gardens, Dublin. 

Messrs. Jennison and Co., Belle Vue, Manchester. 

The Director, Royal Zoological Society, Natura 
Artis Magistra, Amsterdam. 

.The Superintendent, Zoological Gardens, Alipur, 
Calcutta, India. 

The Director, Zoological Gardens, Tokyo, Japan. 

Robt. D. Carson, Zoological Gardens, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., U.S.A. 

Dr. Penrose, Zoological Gardens, Philadelphia, 
Pa., U.S.A. 

E. A. Le Souef, Zoological Gardens, Perth, Aus- 

tralia. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Copenhagen. 
The Director, Zoological Gardens, Rotterdam. 
Dr. F. D. Baker, National Zoological Park, 

Washington, D.C. 
Richard Arnold, Tower House, Leigham Court 

Road, Streatham. 
Lieut. Thomas Buchan, Hepburn, Haddington, 

East Lothian. 
Dr. M.Burnshaw, 51, Cazenove Road, Stoke New- 

ington. 

F. E. Blaauw, Gooliust, St. Graveland, Hilver- 

sum, Holland. 

Wm. Shore-Baily, Boyers House, Westbury, 
Wilts. 

Dr. John K. Butter, M.D., Highfield House, Can- 
nock, Staffs. 

G. Chapman, High Street, Birmingham. 
Mrs. Cotton, The Mount, Bishopstoke. 
F. W. D' Evelyn, San Francisco. 

W. Edmunds, Coombe Farm, Langton Matra- 

vers, Dorset. 
H. Earl, Newgate House, Cottingham, E. Yorks. 
David Ezra, Kydd Stre.t, Calcutta. 
Guy Falkner, Belton, Uppingham. 
Herbert A. French, St. Margaret's, Downs Park 

West, Bristol. 
Linwood Flint, Waterford, Maine, U.S.A. 
R. Gilpin, Zoological Gardens, Washington, U.S. 
Miss Hall, 76, Adelaide Road, Hampstead, N.W. 
Y. E. Harper, Calcutta. 



Miss Howman, 6, Essex Grove, Upper Norwood. 

Rev. Hemsworth, Monks Fryston, S. Milford. 

W. J. Henning, Hillside, New Maiden. 

T. Hebb, Brooklea, Downs Road, Luotn. 

W. A. Harding, Histon Manor, Cambridge. 

Homes Zoological Society, 318, Keith and Perry 
Buildings, Kansas City, U.S.A. 

Lieutenant T. Buchan-Hepburn, Letham, Had- 
dington, Scotland. 

H. Ide, Elm Lawn, Eden Street, Kingston-on- 
Thames. 

William Jamrach, 65, Lordship Lane, Stoke New- 
ington, N. 

Mrs. E. Jordan, Gorthie, Wokingham. 

Mrs. Johnstone, Burrswood, Groombridge, Kent. 

Alderman J. D. Kiley, J. P., 33, Gun Street, 
Spitalfields. 

W. King, 22, High Street, WhitechapeL 

C. F. Leach, Vale Lodge, Leatherhead. 

P. L. Morgan, Westfield, Elgin, Scotland. 

Dan Mason, Maisonette, Broadstairs. 

John W. Marsden, Thornhurst, Tewit Park, Har- 
rogate. 

G. J. B. Meade-Waldo, Stonewall Park, Eden- 
bridge, Kent. 

R. Scott-Miller, Greenoakhill, Broomhouse, Scot- 
land. 

Mrs. C. Prioleau, Loxwood House, Billinghurst. 

L. Pullar, Dunbarnie Cottage, Bridge of Earn. 

Monsieur Pichct, Boulevard Haussman, Paris. 

A. Reeve, Hall-by-the-Sea, Margate. 

Ernest W. Robinson, Liscombe, Leighton Buz- 
zard. 

Gerald Rattigan, Cornwall Gardens, S.W. 

Warren Bruce Smith, Aubrey Lodge, Emsworth, 
Hants. 

G. de Southoff, Leysin, Vaud, Switzerland. 

Dr. W. O. Stillman, 287, State Street, Albany, 
N.Y., U.S.A. 

H. S. Spencer, 109, Barcombe Avenue, Streatham 
Hill. 

Dr. Steel, Londonderry. 

W. H. St. Quinton, Scampston Hall, Rillington, 
York. 

W. R. Temple, Ormonde, Datchet, Bucks. 

W. D. Trickett, Lench House, Waterfoot. 

A. Carr Walker, Tyrie, West Park, Leeds. 

W. Wightman, Estate Office, Aynhoe, Banbury. 

G. L. de Waru, Les Lilas, Leysin, Vaud, Swit- 
zerland. 

Walter Winans, Claridge's Hotel, Brook Street, 
W. 

Captain Woodward, Mayville, Kingston-by-Sea, 

Brighton. 
E. Wuiron, 7, Rue Theophile Gautier, Neuill>, 

pres Paris. 
Messrs. Willsons, 37, New Oxford Street, W. 
A. S. Yates, Bishops Sutton, Alresford, Hants. 



O 8 






M -4 1i)|7 



Hamlyns 



Menagerie 




Magazine. 






No. 11.- Vol. 2. 



MARCH, 1917. 



Price One Shilling. 



CONTENTS. 



NOTICE 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

INTRODUCTORY 

ARE WE WASTING TONNAGE? 

THE ALPINE HARE IN ENGLAND 

THE GREY SQUIRREL 

SOME OBSERVATIONS ON THE HAIRY ARMADILLO IN CAPTIVITY 

GENERAL NOTES 



81 
81 
81 
81 
85 
86 
87 
88 



^ 



«c 



^ 




Telegrams: HamlVn, London Docks, London, 



Telephone : 4366 Avik&I 



JOHN D. HAMLYN, 

221, St. George's Street, London Docks, East. 

Ten minutes from Mark Lane and Aldgate Stations. Fifteen minutes from London Bridge Station 
Buses pass Leman Street, Whitechapel, from all parts thence five minutes walk. 

O.O. payable at Leman Street, East. Cheques crossed " London County & Westminster Bank." 

All Previous Lists Hereby Cancelled. 



TERMS. — NOTICE. — All goods are sold for prompt cash, and Customers must take all risk from me of leaving my establishment. 
Stock once sold cannot be taken back, TELEPHONE. — Orders can be received on telephone, 4380 AVENUE from any 
part of Great Britain any time day and night. LETTERS. — Are answered by return of post, and orders executed same day as 
received. Full name and address with every communication. DELIYERY.— Stock is generally delivered direct to the various 
London Railway Termini but no particular train can be guaranteed. PURCHASING. — I am always open to purchase any 
duplicates or other stock. Kindly make offers for same 



GENERAL 

For the arrivals from abroad during the past a 



INFORMATION. 

3ntn. Full Particulars are. given in 



General Notes. 






From Calcutta. 

I feel sure my numerous readers will be pleased to hear that 
the S.S. " City of Bombay " arrived on Saturday. March 17th, 
with the following stock: — 

1 Elephant, male, 4| feet. 
1 ,, female, 4£ feet. 

These two babies were in splendid condition. They took daily 
exercise with their Native Keeper on deck, 
20 Boxes Rhesus Monkeys, 
i Tiger Cub, female, 10 months. 

4 Demoiselle Cranes. 

5 Ind:an Pythons. 

77 Indian Nightingales — Shamahs. 
They were all brought over on deck, arriving in splendid con- 
tion, and were transhipped to the S.S. " Manhattan " for New 
York, on Monday morning early, March 19th. There was no 
"cargo food space" occupied, verification of which can be 
obtained from Messrs. Montgomerie & Workman, 36, Grace- 
church Street, E.C. 



The S.S. " Media " will arrive about 10th March, with the 

following stock: — 
31 Indian Pythons, measuring from 10 ft. 

to 20 ft 

1 Tiger, female, adult 

8 Pandas, very rare 

220 Monkeys 

28 Impcyan Pheasants 

80 Chukar Partridges 



/ application. 



South African consignments are : — 

5 Zebras 

4 Blcssboks 

4 Chacma 

1 African Leopard, adult 



Prices on 
application. 



To arrive from New York. 

4 Sea Lions, from San Francisco 

The only importation, for 1917. 



Can offer American Snakes, harmless 
American Rattlesnakes, poisonous, very fine 

Bennett Kangaroos 

Australian Emu, adult 

Armadillo, interesting pet 

Mona Monkey, „ , 



each £35 



each £2 

£3 

., £10 

for £16 

,, £3 

£2 



Jew Monkey, interesting pet ... 
Mangabey Monkey, interesting pet 
Vervet Monkey ,, ,, 

Rhesus Monkey 

Dog-faced Baboon 

Drill Baboon 

Mandrill Baboon 

6 Californian Quail 

1 Canadian Tree Porcupine ... 
10 ,, Grey Squirrels ... 
Mongooses, for rats and all vermin 



for 



Blue and White Foxes, 

condition 



2 Blue, 2 Whites, 



£2 
£3 

£2 

£2 

£6 

from £5 to £10. 

from £7 to £20 

for £3 

for 70/6 

each 20/6 

each 40/- 



all in first-class 
each £10 



These are at present deposited with Messrs. Jennison, 
Belle Vue, Manchester, who will be pleased to shew them 
to intending purchasers. They will not be sold one penny 
less than £10 each. 



The following reptiles are on deposit for sale at The Zoologi 
cal Society's Gardens, Regents Park, London :— 

1 Alligator, 6 feet ,.. each 

1 „ 5Jfeet 

3 Giant Toads (Bufo marinus) ... ,, 

5 Small Tortoise, Brazil „ 

2 Adorned Terrapins ... ,, 

1 Heloderm Lizard, poisonous ... ,, 



£8 

£6 
15/2 
20/6 
30J6 
60/6 



Wanted to Purchase.— Swans, Geese, Rare Pheasants, 
Antelopes, Indian Cattle, Kangaroos, Baboons, Monkeys, 
every description of Animals and Birds for prompt Cash. 
Do not dispose of any duplicates whatever to any Zoological 
or Public Gardens, Amateur or others, until you have 
my refusal. 



Menagerie Wagon for sale, foreign make, three compartments, 
box wheels, suitable for Bears, Lions, etc. Price £20, no offer 



Ferrets. 

Warnino to Dealers in Fbrrbts. — No Ferrets shoul 
ever be sent to any dealer in Montauban, France, unless full; 
paid for in advance. My experience has been that when Ferre 
arrive in France, some trivial excuse is made to refuse the eo 
signment, with a view to a considerable redu